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SENATE. 



.No. 14. 



REPORT 



OP 



THE INSPECTORS 



OF THE 



STATE ALMSHOUSE 



AT MONSON, 



TOP. THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 3 1, 1854. 



BOSTON: 

WILLIAM WHITE, PRINTEE TO THE STATE. 
1855. 



Tnt'K 

A 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



To .ERs Excellency the Governor and the Hon. Council of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts : — 

The undersigned, Inspectors of the State Almshouse at 
Monson, in compliance with the statute of the Commonwealth 
in such case provided, and with a by-law adopted by the asso- 
ciated Boards of Inspectors of the several State Almshouses, 
respectfully submit the following Report :— - 

The establishment was opened for the reception of paupers 
on the first day of May last, in accordance with the proclama- 
tion of the Governor. Fortunately, but few were sent to the 
house during the first month after it was opened ; for the es- 
tablishment, in a variety of respects, had not been put in a 
suitable state of preparation for a large number of inmates, nor 
indeed in a state of convenience for any number, (as will be 
noted more particularly hereafter,) when it passed from the 
Commissioners into the hands of the Inspectors and Superin- 
tendent. 

The following summary, derived from the records of the In- 
stitution, ana 1 embraced in the schedule marked (A,) annexed 
hereto, and from the Physician's Report to the Inspectors, 
gives a general view of the inmates, their different classes, 
condition, ages, origin, &c. 

Whole number in the Institution from May 1 to De- 
cember 1, 1854, 723 

Number of males during same period, . . . 458 

" females « ... 265 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



Number of boys under 5 years during same period, 
girls, " 

boys between 5 and 15, 
girls, " " 

15 and 40, 

u 

40 and 60, 



60 and 80, 



males, " 

females, " 

males, " 

females, " 

males, " 

females, " 

males, above 80, " 

females, " 80, " 

Colored persons, " 

natives of Ireland, 

P England and Scotland, 
" all other foreign countries, 
" other States bTthe Union, 
" Massachusetts, , 

idiots and imbeciles, . 

insane persons, . 

deaf and dumb, 

those who have absconded, 

those w T ho have been discharged 

boys bound out, 

girls, " 



boys and girls out on trial, 
inmates December 1, 1854, 

" males, " 

" females, " 

" boys under 15, * ; ' . 

" girls, " « 

" males over 15, " 

« females " , " 

Average number attending week school, 

" " .« Sabbath school, 

Whole number of inmates at the time of making the 

report, December 28, 1854, . . . . . % 615 
The number having been increased in consequence of the se- 
verity of the weather, and also by the transference by the Gov- 
ernor of 86 from the Tewksbury State Almshouse. 



1855.: 



SENATE— No. 14. 



From the Physician's Report. 

Number in an unhealthy condition at the time of ad- 
mission into the house, ...... 

Number admitted into the Hospital from May 1 to 
December 1, 1854, 

And in the several months, as follows : — 

In May, 20 

" June, . . . . . 63 

" July, 49 

« August, 34 

" September, ..... 43 
" October, . . . . 45 

" November, . . . . . 84 



310 
343 



The diseases that have prevailed are as 
Cases of Ophthalmia, . 
" Diarrhea, 


a 


Phthisis, . 


. . 


it 
u 


Dysentery, 

Fever of different forms, 


u 


Pneumonia, 


, . 


.. 


Measles, . 


. , 


u 


Ulcers, . 


. . 


a 


Rheumatism, 


, . 


a 
u 
u 

U 


Dropsy, . 
Synovitis, 
Ship fever, 
Fractures, 


• 


it 


Bronchitis, 


. , 


a 


Scabies, . 


• a 


u 


Asthma, . 


/ 


ti 
u 
u 

a 
u 


Hepatitis, 
Smallpox, 
Lunacy, . 
Syphilis, . 
Jaundice, 


. . 


u 


Salt rheum, 


• s 


u 

it 


Gangrenous i 
Scarlatina, 


sore mouth, 



follows :• 



136 

31 

10 

19 

29 

10 

20 

5 

3 

4 

3 

3 

6 

5 

7 

1 

4 

2 

1 

9 

1 

1 

4 

1 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan, 



Cases of Pleurisy, 



u 


Cholera Morbus, . 


a 


Delirium tremens, . 


u 


Amenorrhea, 


• • 


a 


Amputation 


of the les 


a 


Fits, 


. 


U 


Entiritis, 


» 


u 


Marasmus, 


. 


a 


Abscess, . 


. » 


a 


Tonsillitis, 


, . 


u 


Accident, 


. 


a 


Gastritis, 


. . 


a 


Gonorrhea, 


, 


a 


Old age, . 


• 




Whole number, 



2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
5 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 

343 



The foregoing list does not include all the cases requiring 
some medical attention. Cases of slight or temporary illness 
are not usually noted in the medical records of the Institu- 
tion. 

It also appears from the Report of the Physician that no 
disease has prevailed in the Almshouse that could properly be 
called an epidemic, unless it be the measles, many cases of 
which have appeared in the house during the latter part of 
November and the month of December. 

The number of deaths from May 1 to December 1, 1854 ? 
is 40. 

The diseases of those who died are as follows, viz. : — 



Cases of Phthisis, . 



Dysentery, 

Organic malformation, ( 

Diarrhea, 

Dropsy, . . • 

Old age, . 

Injury on railroad, 

Marasmus, 

Dropsy with gangrene, 

Fits, . 

Typhus fever, . 



an infant,) 



11 
10 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

5 

1 

% 

2—40 



1855.] SENATE— No. 14. 7 

Ntimber of births during the above period, one being still- 
born, 14. 

In relation to the financial concerns of the Institution, the 
Statement hereto annexed, marked (B,) gathered from the 
'books of account kept by the Clerk, will show what has been 
received from the State treasury and from other sources, and 
the expenditures that have been made, both in permanent im- 
provements and in the current support of the paupers ; also 
other items of interest. 

The following is an abstract from the Statement referred to 
above : — 

Amount of cash received from the Common- 
wealth, from May 1 to December 1, 1854, . $29,512 17 
Received from all other sources, .... 205 18 



$29,717 35 



Expenditures during same period, viz. : — 
For provisions, and other articles for immediate 

use or consumption, also for wages and labor, $17,863 41 

For furniture, farm stock and implements, . . 4,492 29 

For building, 7,191 81 

$29,547 51 

Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1854, . . . 169 84 



Inventory of property on hand 

Dec. 1, 1854, .... $11,886 43 
Building account, .... 7,191 81 



$29,717 35 



$19,078 24 



Deduct this amount from the amount of expend- 
itures as above, and it leaves the sum of . $10,469 27 
Add bills unpaid Dec. 1, 1854, . . . . 320 00 

And it gives the sum of $10,789 27 



Which sum is the whole expense of supporting the paupers 
from May 1 to December 1, 1854, without including, however, 
the interest on the cost of the establishment. 



8 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

The average number of inmates from May 1 to 
December 1, 1854, is 354 

The number of weeks from May 1 to December 
1, 1854, is 30f 

The whole cost of supporting the paupers during 
that period, per week, is, therefore, . . . $352 92 



And the cost of supporting each [single pauper 

during same period, per week, is 99^ 

As we have before intimated, the Institution was openecL 
under great disadvantages. A large portion of the basement, 
comprising the laundry, the bakery, and a part of the cellar, 
was overflowing with water from springs in the rear of the 
buildings, and it was necessary to construct a large stone 
drain for carrying off this water. Accordingly a drain was 
constructed, thirty-five rods long, at an expense of about 
$1000, as estimated — the cost being probably a third more 
than it would have been if the work had been done the sum- 
mer before. 

There were no fences around the premises to prevent the 
inmates from escaping at their pleasure ; and some of the most 
common conveniences, such as are absolutely necessary for an 
establishment of this kind, had not been provided. These 
have all since been supplied at a considerable expense of labor 
and money. 

So, too, the grounds about the buildings were in a rough 
and ungraded state ; and it has been necessary to expend a 
large amount of labor in levelling and bringing them into a 
convenient and decent shape. About 3,500 yards of dirt have 
been removed in grading since May last, and vast quantities 
of rock and stone have also been taken from the premises. 

There were also no sheds erected, nor any wagon house ; 
and the barn and enclosures for the cattle, &c, were in an un- 
finished state. 

Many fixtures, wanting about the premises, were also to be 
provided ; and several changes in the apartments it was found 
necessary to make as the exigencies of the case have required. 

In the month of June, the springs that supplied the house 
with water in a great measure failed ; and it was necessary, at 



1855.] SENATE— No. 14. 9 

a considerable expense, to supply the deficiency by a branch 
pipe from other springs. , 

It has also been necessary to dig two wells near the build- 
ings, at a cost of about $80 ; and also to lay a drain from 
the eave spouts, at a cost of about $200. Other expenses for 
similar purposes, of less amounts, have also been incurred. 

And in connection with the foregoing statements, we may 
remark, that the first year is by no means a fair test of the pol- 
icy of this mode of supporting our foreign paupers. Besides 
the many disadvantages referred to above, it is also to be con- 
sidered that it is no easy matter at the outset, without the 
advantage of previous experience, to put such an establishment 
into successful operation. Some mistakes would necessarily 
be made, which can be avoided hereafter; and, with the light 
of this year's experience, the Institution may, in time to come, 
be conducted in a more systematic and economical manner. 
It should also be remembered, that the present year is distin- 
guished for the high prices of provisions ; and we may also 
add, that expenses have been incurred for winter clothing and 
bedding, and also in fitting out the medical department, which 
will not be necessary to the same extent hereafter. Yet, on 
the whole, the results of this year's trial have, in our opinion, 
been quite as successful as could, under the circumstances, 
have been expected. 

Buildings and Farm, — The buildings, it is well known, are 
constructed of wood, with slate roofs. It would have been in 
better keeping with other public Institutions of the Common- 
wealth, and afforded a more secure protection against fire, if 
the materials had been of a more substantial character. And 
this is the more to be regretted, as the location is in the vicinity 
of stone quarries ; so that the expense of erecting buildings of 
this material could not have exceeded, by a very large sum., 
the actual cost of the present establishment. But as it is, 
with such a multitude of helpless and infirm persons of both 
sexes brought together in these buildings, humanity demands 
that every precaution possible should be taken against fire. 
And in this view, as well also as on the score of economy, it 
is a question of some moment, whether the present mode of 
w r arming the houses by furnaces is the best that can be 
devised. That by steam has been suggested as a better mode. 
2 



10 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

The Superintendent exercises much vigilance in this matter, 
and endeavors to have proper care taken at all times of the 
tires, and a regular watch is kept over the premises during 
every night. 

Some material alterations it will be necessary to make, in 
some of the apartments of the buildings, to meet the wants of 
the establishment; and the health of the inmates also requires 
that a better ventilation be secured by suitable openings 
through the roofs. 

There is a small farm house on the premises, which has 
been used during the past season as a hospital for infectious 
persons. But it is unsuitable as to location and in other 
respects for this purpose, and it is thought it will be necessary 
to put up a small building nearer the Almshouse, to be appro- 
priated exclusively to this object. 

The building originally designed as a workshop has, from 
necessity, been used for other purposes, for the accommodation 
of the inmates. Portions of it will hereafter be applied to the 
original purpose as occasion may require. 

A building has recently been erected, not yet quite finished, 
which includes a wood house, and suitable rooms for idiots, 
insane persons, imbeciles, and other paupers, not proper to be 
kept with the other inmates in the Almshouse. 

It will be necessary, during the coming season, to provide a 
tomb, an ice house, and some other like accommodations for 
the Institution, though not of a very expensive character. 

The Farm consists of about 1S5 acres, about 30 acres being 
wood land, and the residue pasturage, tillage, and a small por- 
tion mowing. It is for the most part of a hard and rocky soil, 
and will require the labor of years to put it into a good state 
of cultivation ; yet some of it is capable, by proper culture, of 
being made very productive. 

It has been necessary to bestow so much of the labor at 
his command upon the grounds immediately around the build- 
ings, that the Superintendent has not been able to give that 
attention to the cultivation of the farm which can be given to 
this object in future years. 

Food of the Inmates. — It has been an object of the Superin- 
tendent and Inspectors to provide, in the most economical 



1855.] SENATE— No. 14. 11 

manner, plain, substantial and wholesome food, with a suita- 
ble variety during the week. 

Annexed is the Bill of Fare, as established at the present 
time, being the paper marked (C.) 

Employment of the Inmates. — All who are able to work are 
required to apply themselves to some kind of labor ; generally, 
no compulsion has been necessary for this purpose, but the 
inmates have, for the most part, desired to make themselves 
useful in some way by their industry. The aggregate of labor 
thus obtained from the inmates has been considerable ; but 
probably it will be much more hereafter, as new modes of 
employment may be devised, and more systematic arrange- 
ments adopted, in the several departments of labor. 

Government and Moral Discipline. — The Institution is gov- 
erned, as the Inspectors believe, mildly, but firmly, by the 
Superintendent, and the discipline is such as should be exer- 
cised over such an establishment. 

A code of internal regulations has been adopted by the 
Superintendent, with the approval of the Inspectors, being the 
annexed paper marked (D,) and the same are firmly carried 
into effect. The inmates seem generally happy and contented, 
and disposed to yield a prompt and cheerful obedience, so that 
it is seldom necessary to use any restraint ,or discipline to 
insure this. 

Much credit is due to the Superintendent and his associates 
for the neatness, good order and discipline which prevail in the 
Institution. 

It is a primary object with the Superintendent to have all 
under his charge governed in their conduct by moral and reli- 
gious principles, and to form in all habits of neatness, indus- 
try and morality, so that, when they are discharged, they may 
go forth into the community better men and better women 
than they were before. 

In connection with this head, the document marked (E) is 
annexed, being the by-laws adopted by the associated Boards 
of Inspectors, and approved by the Governor. 

Religious Instruction and Services. — A chaplain has been 
provided, viz., the Rev. Mr. Wright, who preaches and con- 
ducts the devotional exercises in the chapel on the morning of 
each Sabbath, and superintends the Sabbath School in the 



12 ALMSHOUSE AT MON^ON. [Jan. 

afternoon, and also conducts the devotional exercises of the 
inmates every evening. All meet at these exercises who are 
able, and apparently take much interest in them. The influ- 
ence of these exercises upon the inmates is in every respect 
exceedingly salutary. Mr. Wright also ministers to the sick 
and afflicted, and performs all the other duties which apper- 
tain to the office of chaplain. The Sabbath School is attended 
by all the children of proper age, and by some of the adults,, 
with great benefit to all. A valuable Sabbath School library 
is connected with the school. 

Children and Youth. — Quite a large number of the inmates 
belongs to this class. The whole number at j;he present time, 
(December 28, 1854,) under 15 years of age, is 356. Ample 
provision has been made for the instruction and education of 
such of this class as are of suitable age by a supply of school 
books, and the establishment of a school, which is regularly 
kept twice a day, viz., in the morning and in the afternoon. 
Mr. H. W. Stickney is the principal teacher, and Mrs. Weston 
assistant teacher. The whole number belonging to the school 
is 175 ; average number attending, about 150. 

The children generally appear to love the school room, and 
manifest a remarkable interest in their studies, and their pro- 
ficiency is better than is usually found in our District Schools 
in the country. The school is under admirable discipline, and 
is thoroughly taught ; pains are taken, not only to instruct them 
intellectually, but to train them morally, and cultivate in them 
all those habits of virtue, of subordination, of industry and 
neatness, that will make them worthy and useful citizens. 

As opportunities offer, children of a proper age are placed 
under the charge and control of suitable persons in the coun- 
try till they arrive at full age. Care is taken that situations 
be selected for this purpose where they will be kindly treated, 
and properly trained and educated in some useful art or em- 
ployment. Provision is made in each indenture for the pay- 

ent to the apprentice of a certain sum of money at the end 
of the term, varying from $25 to $100, according to the age of 
the child when taken. Annexed is a copy of the form of in- 
denture used, being the paper marked (F.) 

Laws relating to Paupers. — The whole legislation in refer- 
ence to State paupers needs a careful revision, so far at least 



1855.] senate—No. 14. 13 

as to define with more exactness the powers and duties of the 
Inspectors of the Almshouses. 

There are sundry questions on this point which cannot now 
be satisfactorily answered. 

For instance, a pauper lives in one of the almshouses for 
some time at- the expense of the Commonwealth, when it is 
discovered that he has funds in a savings bank, or some other 
property elsewhere, sufficient to remunerate the State for the 
expense of his support. Now, can this property be reached in 
any way for the above purpose by any process of law or 
otherwise in behalf of the State ? and if so, by whom shall it 
be done ? And if an inmate dies in the almshouse, leaving 
property (out of the house,) has any one legal authority to 
take possession of the same, or obtain the possession by action 
of law, so as to be able to apply it in defraying the expenses 
of the deceased pauper at the almshouse? Or, in case it is 
reasonably supposed at any time that an inmate has a settle- 
ment in some town in the Commonwealth, whose duty is it to 
institute proceedings for determining the matter? and if deter- 
mined affirmatively, is there any remedy against the town for 
past expenses incurred in the support of such pauper? 

Similar questions also arise in relation to the kindred of pau- 
pers, who are legally liable for their support; so also in rela- 
tion to the support of illegitimate children born in either of the 
almshouses. And other questions of a like character might be 
suggested, all of which show the need of additional or explana- 
tory laws on these points. 

There are certain specific powers conferred upon the Alms- 
house Inspectors, relating to the binding out of children, the 
removal of lunatic paupers, &c, similar to those of Overseers 
of the Poor of towns ; but none of them include any of the 
points above mentioned. 

Most if not all the difficulties above referred to might 
probably be obviated by a brief act of the Legislature, invest- 
ing the Inspectors with the same powers and obligations as 
those of Overseers of ijhe Poor of towns. 

In conclusion, the Inspectors would state that they made 
such arrangements at the opening of the almshouse as to 
secure a visitation of the same by some one of the Inspectors 
at least once every xueek^ according to the statute, in addition 



14 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

to their regular monthly meetings for examining and auditing 
the accounts of the Institution. At these visitations, it has 
been their aim and endeavor to make a thorough examination 
of the establishment and its concerns. 

JOSIAH HOOKER, 
A. V. BLANCHARD, 
ALVIN SMITH, 

Inspectors. 
State Almshouse, Monson % December 28 3 1854, 



TABULAR VIEW 



16 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan 



TABULAR 

Of the State Almshouse at Monson, 













Came 




No. 


Fame. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 

State. 


Vessel or Eailroad. 


1 


Covany, Johanna 


30 


Ireland, 


Springfield, 


1850 




2 


Covany, Alice 


3 


Meriden, Ct., 


do 


1851 




3 


Covany, Michael 


9 mo 


Springfield, 


do 






4 


Brady, Ann 


32 


Ireland, 


do 


1851 




5 


Doyle, Rosanna 


62 


do 


do 


1849 




6 


Cummings, Ellen 


25 


do 


do 


1854 




7 


Brady, Ellen 


5 


Albany, N. Y., 


do 


1851 




8 


Maloy, Elizabeth 


2 


Springfield, 


do 


* 




-9 


O'Brien, Mary A. 


1* 


do 


do 






10 


Hancock, Charlotte 


28 


N. Hartford, Ct. 


do 


1834 




11 


Gunn, Margaret 


30 


Ireland, 


do 


1853 




12 


Gunn, Jane 


s 6w 


Springfield, 


do 






13 


Griffin, Margaret 


20 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 




14 


Butler, William 


8 


do 


do 


1854 




15 


Lyons, Catharine 


28 


do 


do 


1839 




16 


Lyons, Margaret 


9 


Saxonville, 


do 






17 


Lyons, Bridget 


6 


Springfield, 


do 






18 


Hodges, Elizabeth 


52 


Ireland, 


do 


1849 




19 


Sullivan, John 


30 


do 


do 






20 


Calanane, Eliza 


33 


do 


do 


1843 




21 


Calanane, Cornelius 


7 


Springfield, 

Hartford, 

Ireland, 


do 






22 Hanify, Mary Ann 

23 O'Brien, Michael 


4 
25 


do 
do 


1854 




24 


Collier, Mary 


40 


England, 


do 


1847 




25 


Cobb, Amelia 


60 


Connecticut, 


do 


185-4 




26 


O'Donnall, Patrick 


48 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 


Been in U. S. 6 ms. 


27 


Hoelzli, Benedict 


28 


Germany, 


do 


1854 




28 


Ragan, Daniel 


63 


Ireland, 


do 


1846 




29 


Lonergan, John 


30 


do 


do 


1847 




30 


Hayes, Hannah 


25 


do 


do 


1845 




31 


Hayes, Patrick 


6 


Greenfield, 


do 






32 


Hayes, James 


1£ 


do 


do 






33 


McCudden, Ellen 


20 


St. John's, 


do 


1854 




34 


Griffin, Catharine 


42 


Ireland, 


do 


1851 




35 


Griffin, Margaret 


7mo 


Springfield, 


do 






36 


Singon, Edwin 


2 


W. Springfield, 


do 






37 


Smith, John W. 


28 


New Brunswick, 


do 


1838 




38 


Barnes, Ellen 


42 


Ireland, 


do 


1828 




39 


Johnson, Honora 


25 


do 


do 


1845 




40 


Johnson,- Margaret 


5 


Springfield, 


do 






41 


Johnson, Lovina 


3 


do 


do 






42 


Co fir in, Andrew J. 


10 


Litchfield, Ct., 


do 


1853 




43 


Sullivan, John 


32 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 


i 


44 


Sullivan, Patrick 


10 


Canada, 


do 


1845 




45 


Doneley, Catharine 


29 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 


Marina. 


46 


Furrois, Anthony 


70 


New Orleans, 


do 






47 


Cochran, Stephen 


25 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 




48 


Lane, Robert 


66 


England. 


do 


1834 




49 


Callehan, Margaret 


20 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 




50 


Barrett, Dennis 


23 


do 


do 


1851 




51 


Nugent, Bridget 


12 


do 


do 


1854 




52 


Wilcox, Daniel 


42 


Greenwich, 


Greenwich, 






53 


Carter, Jacob 


73 


Africa, 


Williamst'n, 


1810 




54 


Jones, Jane 


13 


Williamstown, 


do 






55 


Galusha, Rachel 


69 


do 


do 






56 


Porter, Sarah 


30 


Ireland, 


do 


1853 




718 


Jones, James 


10 


Williamstown, 


do 






1 


McKenney, Thomas 


50 Bath, Me., 


Palmer, 







1855. 



SENATE— No. 14. 



17 



VIEW 

for the year ending December 31, 1853. 



Via. 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Dise'i 


g'd. 


Kemarks. 




May 


2 


Healthv, 2 chil'n 








Been in U. S. 4 years. 




do 


2 


do" 








do 3 do 




do 


2 


do 








m. 






do 


6 


Has Fits, 










do 3 do 




do 


6 


Healthy, 










do 5 do 




do 


6 


Pregnant, 










do 6 ninths. 




do 


6 


Healthy, 










do 3 years. 




do 


6 


Diseased, 














do 


6 


Healthy, 


Aug. 11 












do 


8 


Diseased, 










do 20 do 


Canada, 


do 
do 


8 

8 


do 
Healthy, 










do 1 do 


N.Y. & Hartford 


do 


S 


Pregnant, 










do 6 mnths. 


Deer Island, 


do 


8 


Healthy, 








m. 


do 6 do 


Boston, 


do 
do 
do 


9 
9 
9 


do 2 chil'n 

do 

do 










do 15 years. j 


do 


do 


9 


do 










do 5 do 




do 


9 


do 




June 


26 


Absc. m. 


New York, 


do 


9 


do 




do 


8 


Been in U.S. 11 do 




do 


9 


do 




do 


8 


m. 






do 


10 


Whooping co'gh, 












■ do 


do 


17 


Ship fever 




July 


19 


m. 


do 6 mnths. 




do 


20 


Pregnant, 




Oct. 


16 




do 7 years. 


do 


June 


1 


Diseased, 




July 


22 




do 6 mnths. 


do 


do 


2 


do 




do 


22 


m. 


Sent to Worcester. 


do 


do 


8 


Smallpox, 




do- 


3 


m. 


In U. S. 6 mnths. 


Boston, 


do 


21 


Ulcers, 




June 


30 


m. 


Absc. do 8 years. 


* do 


do 


21 


Pulmonary dis. | 


July 


10 


m. 


do 7 do 


New York, 


July 


7 


Well, 


do 


28 




do 9 do 




do 


7 


do 


do 


28 


m. 






do 


7 


do 


do 


28 


m. 




Albany, 


do 


14 


Pregnant, 




ISlov. 


14 




do 6 mnths. 


New York, 


do 
do 


27 
27 


Diseased, 
do 










do 3 years. 




Aug. 


2 


Well, 




Sept. 


12 


m. 






do 


5 


do 




Aug. 


8 


m. 


do 16 do 


do 


do 


18 


Debauched, 




Sept. 


26 




do 26 do 


Boston, 


Sept. 
do 
do 


12 
12 
12 


Well, 
do 
Sick, 




do 


27 




do 9 do 




do 


16 


Well, 








m. 


do If year. 


ISIew York, 


do 


16 


Dysentery, 








m. 


do 6 mnths. 




do 


20 


Well, vagrant, 








m. 


do 9 years. 




do 


29 


Pregnant, 










do 6 mnths 




Oct. 


18 










m. 




do 


do 


24 


Sick, 




Oct. 


29 


m. 


do 6 mnths. 




do 


28 


Lame, 








m. 


do 20 years. 


do 


Nov. 


3 


Pregnant, 










do 6 mnths. 


Boston, 


do 


17 


Pulmonary dis. 








m. 


do 3 years. 


New York, 


do 

May 


28 
1 


Sore eyes, 
Embecile, 








ax. 


do 6 mnths. 




do 


2 


[nfirm and blind, 








m. 


do 44 years. 




do 


2 


Ldiotic, df. & d'b. 














do 


2 


Imbecile, 














June 


23 


Pregnant, 










do 1 year. 




Sept. 


26 


Well, 








m. 






May 


3 


Lame, 


Nov. 29 






m. 





18 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



TABLE— 









Caine 




No. 


Xame. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 
State. 


Vessel or Railroad. 


2 Loan, Elizabeth 


23 


Ireland, 


Palmer, 


1847!Steamboat. 


3 Loan, Mary J. 


lijSo. Hadley Falls, 


do 






4|Loan, Henry Edward 


3 w Palmer, 


do 






5 Corkary, Mary 


14 


Ireland, 


do 


1852 




6 Corkary, Patrick 


5 


do 


do 


1853 




7 j Corkary, Bridget 


3 


do 


do 


1852 




SjPerham, Sarah M. 


13 


Middleton, Vt, 


do 


1846 




9 j Sullivan, Bridget 


26 


Ireland, 


do 


1851 




10 Palmer, Lucretia 


5 w 




do 






11 


Hickev, James 


45 


do 


do 


1839 




12 


Thrift," Ralph 


21 


England, 


do 


1853 




13 


Shehee, Thomas 


20 


Ireland. 


do 


1854 




14 


Kinefix, William 


31 


do ' 


do 


1850 




15 


Divine, Catharine 


36 


do 


do 


1836 




16 


White, Mary 


30 


do 


do 


1852 




17 


Goodhue, Abby 


21 


do 


do 


1845 




18 


Finn, John 


50 


do 


do 


1835 




19 


Finn, Mary 


35 j England, 


do 


1841 




20 


Flynn, David 


10 


Ireland, 


do 






21 


Long, Patrick 


20 


do 


do 


1854 




22 


Finn, Elizabeth 


10 


Worcester, 


do 






23 


Finn, Maria 


12 


do 


do 






24 


Mansfield, Bridget 


25 


Ireland, 


do 






25 


Bools, Hugh 


65 


do 


do 


1854 




26 


Howland, William 


52 


do 


do 


1824 




27 


Henley, Michael 


32 


do 


do 


1854 




711 


Haven, Robert 


30 


do 


do 


1854 


John Baily. 


712 


Haven, Thomas 


20 


do 


do 


1852 


Hope. 


84 


O'Connor, Agnes 


32 


Scotland, 


Ware, 


1834 


* 


85 


do do 


4 


Chicopee, 


do 






86 


DeSarga, Mary 


9 


Ireland, 


do 


1851 




87 Riley, Mary 


30 


do 


do 


1848 




88 Smith, Solomon 


58 


Killingsbury, 


Holden, 


1833 




89Kane, Thomas 


51 


Ireland, 


Milford, 


1853 




90 Holden, Catharine 


25 


do 


do 


1841 




91 'Holden, Charles 


6 mo 


Lowell, 


do 






92 Quinlin, James 


21 


Ireland, 


do 


1852 




93 Hines, Francis 


40 


do 


do 


1854 




94 Darby, Sullivan 


50 


do 


do 


1852 




95'Higgins, Edmund 


26 


do 


. do 


1854 




96; Douglass, Samuel 


55 


N. Kingston, 


Brimfield, 


1845 




709 Thompson, Peter 


65 


Belchertown, 


do 






97 Griffin, Thomas 


53 


Ireland, 


So. Hadley. 






98 Mahar, John 


59 


do 


W. Boylst ; n, 


1852 




99 Murphy, William 


30 


do 


do 


1851 


Plymouth Rock. 


100 Murphy, Ann 


26 


do 


do 


1854 




101'White, George C. 


21 


do 


do 


1843 




102'White, Mary 


27 


do 


do 


1841 




103 White, Chas. K. 


3 


Milford, 


do 






104 White, Patrick 


llmiHopkinton, 


do 






105 Darling, James 


97 


Scotland, 


Blackstone, 


1819 




106 Donahue, Patrick 


10 


Ireland, 


do 


1852 




107Gaffney, Mary 


30 


do 


do 


1842 




108 Gaffney, Sarah A. 


4 


Blackstone, 


do 






109Gaffney, Patrick 


H 


do 


do 






110 Mathewman, Paul 


27 


England, 


do 


1854 




111 Fitzpatrick, Barnaby 


29 


Ireland, 


do 


1850 


Albert Gallatin. 


112 Manning, Ann 


22 


do 


do 


1851 




113 Darling, Ann 


6 w Blackstone, 


do 






114 Holland, Thomas 


22 


Germany, 


do 


1851 




115 Smith, Joseph 


49 


do 


do 


1853 




116 Smith, Corroner 


50 


do 


do 


1853 




117 Smith, Oren 


30 


do 


do 


1853 




118 Smith, Elizabeth 


18 


do 


do 


1853 





1855.] 



senate—No. 14. 



19 



Continued. 



Via. * 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd. 


Remarks. 


St. John's, 


May 8 


JNursing, 








Been in U. S. 7 years. 




do 8 


Healthy, 














do 8 


do 








m. 




New York, 


do 8 


Itch, 




May 


26 




do 2 do 


do 


do 8 


do 




do 


26 


m. 


do 1 do 


do 


do 8 
do 15 
do 19 
June 7 


do 
Simple, 
Rheumatism, 
Well, 


Aug. 31 


do 


26 




do 2 do 
. do 8 do 

do 3 do 


New Brunswick, 


do 22 


Chronic dis. 








m. 


do 15 do 


New Hampshire, 


July 1 






July 


27 


m. 


Absc. do 1 do 


New York, 


do 17 


Intermit't fever, 




Sept. 


11 


m. 


do 6 ninths. 


Boston, 


Aug. 1 


Diseased, 








m. 


do 4 years. 


St. John's, 


do 2 


Well, 










do 18 do 


New York, 


do 9 


Sick, 




Aug. 


25 




do 2 do 


Boston, 


do 9 


Pregnant, 










do 9 do 




Sept. 7 


Sore eyes, 








m. 


do 19 do 


do 


do 12 
do 23 


Sick, 

Foot smashed, 








m. 


do 13 do 


New York, 


do 27 
Oct. 1 
do 1 
do 2 


Ship fever, 
Well, 

do 

do 




Nov. 


28 


m. 


do 6 do 




do 4 


Diseased, 








in. 


do 6 do 




do 24 


Well, 








m. 


do 30 do 


Hartford, 


do 26 


Diseased, 








m. 


do 6 ninths. 


Quebec, 


Nov. 29 










m. 


do 6 do 


Boston, 


do 29 










m. 


do 2 years. 




May 5 


Pregnant, 




July 


28 




do 20 do 




do 5 


Well. 




do 


28 






New York, 


June 12 


do 




June 


17 




do 3 do 


Boston, 


Oct. 21 


Pregnant, 










do 6 do 




May 8 


Lame, &c, 




Nov. 


6 


m. 


do 21 do 


do 


do 8 


Diseased, 




Sept. 


1 


in. 


do 1 do 


New York, 


July 27 
do 27 


Nursing, 
Well, 








m. 


do 13 do 


do 


do 27 


Ophthalmia, 




do 


8 


m. 


do 2 do 


Boston, 


Sept. 4 


Fever and Ague, 








m. 


do 6 mnths. 


Norwich, 


do 25 


Dysentery, 








m. 


do 2 years. 


New York, 


Oct. 9 


Diseased, 








m. 


do 6 ninths. 




May 8 


do 


July 27 






m. 


do 9 do 




Nov. 24 


Lame, 








m. 




Boston, 


May 12 


Blind & infirm, 








m. 




do 


do 13 


Rheumatism, 








m. 




do 


June 6 


Broken leg, 




Aug. 


25 


ra. 




do 


July 8 


Pregnant, 












do 


Oct. 17 


Well, 








m. 




do 


do 17 
do 17 
do 17 


do 
do 

Diseased, 








m. 

m. 




do 


Mav 8 


Infirm, 








m. 




do 


do" 8 


Scald head, 








m. 




do 


do 26 
do 27 
do 27 


Diseased, 

Well, 

Diseased, 








m. 




Hartford, 


June 1 


do 




July 


29 


m. 




New York,_ 


do 5 


Deranged, 








m. 




Boston, 


do 29 
do 29 


Sick and insane, 
Well, 












New York, 


July 5 


Blind, 








m. 




do 


do 5 


Well, 








m. 




do 


do 5 


Lame, 








m. 




do 


do 5 


Well, 








m. 




do 


do 5 


do 













20 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 









TABLE- 


















Came 




No. 


Name. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 
State. 


Vessel or Kailroad. 


119 


Smith, John 


16 


Germany, 


Blackstone, 


1853 




120 


Cruse, William 


10 


[reland, 


do 






121 


Cruse, Bridget 


7 


Providence, 


do 






122 


Burns, John 


10 


[reland, 


do 


1849 




123 


Burns, Joseph 


8 


do 


do 


1S49 




124 


Burns, Thomas 


3 


Blackstone, 


do 






125 


Caiman, Betsy R. 


30 


[reland, 


do 


1849 




126 


Riley, Margaret 


5 w 


Blackstone, 


do 






127 


Callum, Julia 


7 


[reland, 


do 


1849 




128 


Martin, Hannah 


9 


Boston, 


do 






129 


Meggarrall, Dennis 


25 


[reland, 


do 


1852 




130 


Cooley, Jemima 


71 




Pittsfield 






131 


Williams, Samuel 


3 




do 






132 


Abraham, William 


62 


England, 


do 


1813 




133 


Faha, Margaret 


23 


[reland, 


do 


1851 




134 


Rule, Sarah E. 


16 


do 


do 






135 


Henry, Mary 


3 


Pittsfield, 


do 






136 


Sydney, Edward 


34 


Providence, 


do 


1854 




137 


Pharal, Ann 


26 


Ireland, 


do 


1846 


Sheridan, 


138 


Pharal, Philip 


6 w 


Pittsfield, 


do 






139 


Flouton, George 


4 


New York, 


do 


1853 




140 


Williams, William 


58 


England, 


do 


1814 


Diermaid, 


141 


Giles, William 


4 


Connecticut, 


do 






142 


Hall, John 


60 


England, 


do 


1812 




143 


Damty, William 


•51 


do 


do 


1845 




144 


Burns, Robert 


8 


New York, 


do 






145 


Parsons, Robert 


80 


do 


Lee, 


1832 




146 


Goodale, Thomas 


54 


England, 


do 


1853 




147 


Bradford, Nathan 


70 


New Hampshire, 


do 


1780 




148 


Ranney, Fanny 


80 


Virginia, 


do 






149 


Kelly, Lorenzo 


4 


Lee, 


do 






150 


Lee, Mary Ann 


U 


do 


do 






151 


Smith, Hugh 


35 


Ireland, 


Holyoke, 


1849 




152 


Edwards, Isabella 


23 


Scotland, 


do 


1854 


North America, 


153 


Smith, Elizabeth 




do 


do 


1854 


do 


154 


O'Brien, Morris 


30 


Ireland, 


do 


1849 




155 


Lynch, Mary 


35 


do 


do 


1854 




156 


McBride, Agnes 


27 


Scotland, 


do 


1854 


do 


157 


Houston, Susan 


23 


Ireland, 


do 


1850 




158 


Harney, William 


19 


do 


do 


1854 




159 


Cronin, Abby 


35 


do 


do 


1854 




160 


Cronin, Daniel 


9 mo 


Holyoke, 


do 






161 


Andrews, Charles 


81 


Newport, 


N'thampt'n, 


1834 




162 


Jackson, Lucy - 


34 


Virginia, 


do 


1849 




163 


Jackson, Albert 


6 


Northampton, 


do 






164 


Johnson, Primus 


100 


Connecticut, 


do 


1825 




165 


Wheeler, Richard 


83 


Kinderhook, 


do 


1814 




166 


Martin, Mary 


68 


Newport, 


Adams, 


1786 




167 


Martin, Sarah 


67 


Adams, 


do 






168 


Mansfield, Jane ' 


86 


Ireland, 


do 


1844 




169 


Renney, Edward 


69 


England, 


do 


1811 




170 


Woods, James 


40 


Ireland, 


do 


1842 




171 


Woods, James, Jr. 


7 


Adams, 


do 






172 


Woods, Mary 


9 


' do 


do 






173 


Woods, William 


2 


do 


do 






174 


Brisnaham Hugh 


60 


Ireland, 


Fitchburg, 


1834 




175 


Dunovine, Timothy 


60 


do 


do 


1851 




176 


Flynn, Patrick 


73 


do 


do 


1848 




177 


Whalon, John 


8 


Fitchburg, 


do 






178 


Whalon, Mary 


7 


do 


do 






179 


Whalon, Hannah 


4 


do 


do 






180 


Carroll, Hugh 


56 


Ireland, 


do 


1841 




181 


Carroll, Clarinda 


37 


do 


do 


1843 




182 


Carroll, Maria C. 


3 


Fitchburg, 


do 







1855.] 



SENATE— No. 14. 



21 







Continued. 










Via 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd 


Remarks. 


New York, 


July 5 


Well, 








m. 






do 17 








|m. 






do 17 














Aug. 4 


do 








m. 






do 4 


do 








in. 






do 4 


do 








m. 




Providence, 


do 8 
do 8 


do 
do 


Oct. 13 


Oct. 


28 






New York, 


Oct. 16 


do 




do 


28 








do 16 


do 




Nov. 


30 




do 


Nov. 14 


Lame back, 








m. 






May 8 


Infirm, insane, 




July 


25 








do 8 


Well, 








m. 






do 8 


Diseased, 








m. 




do 


do 8 
do 8 
do 8 


Pregnant, 

Imbecile, 

Healthy, 




Oct. 


2 






Albany, 


do 8 


Diseased, 








m. 




New York, 


do 29 


Healthy, 




July 


7 








do 29 


do 


June 25 






m. 






do 29 


do 








m. 






do 29 


Rheumatism, 




June 


8 


m. 






July 24 


Well, 








m. 






Aug. 22 


Dysentery, 








m. 


Was in war of 1812. 


Quebec, 


do 23 
Oct. 26 
May 16 


Org'c. dis. heart, 

Well, 

Rheumatism, 


Sept. 13 






m. 
m, 

in. 




Albany, 


do .16 
do 16 
do 16 
do 16 
do 16 


Diseased, 
Infirm, 
do 
Healthy, 




Aug. 


8 


m. 
m. 

m. 






June 7 






July 


24 


m. 




Boston, 


Oct. 26 


Diseased, 










do 


do 26 


do 












do 


May 16 


White swelling, 








in 




do 


do 26 


Diseased, 












do 


June 17 


Helpless, insane, 












New York, 


July 28 

Aug. 10 


Pregnant, 
Diseased, 




Sept. 


13 


m. 




' do 


Oct. 3 


do 












do 


do 3 


do 








m. 






May 13 


Lame, 


Sept. 1 






m. 




New Haven, 


do 13 
do 13 


Fits, 
Healthy, 








m. 






do 13 


Old and infirm, 


Oct. 7 






in. 






Nov. 20 


Infirm, 








m. 




, 


May 15 


Feeble, 


Nov. 21 












do 15 


Lame, 












New York, 


do 15 


Sickness, 












Boston, 


do 15 


Numb palsy, 


• 






m. 




New York, 


Aug. 28 
do 28 
do 28 
do 28 


Well, 
do 
do 
do 




Sept. 


26 


m. 
m. 

m. 




Boston, 


May 16 


Breach, 




July 


1 


m. 


' 


do 


do 16 


[nfirm, 








m. 




New York, 


do 16 


do 








m. 






do 16 


Well, 




Sept. 


20 


m. 






do 16 


do 




do 


20 








do 16 


Sore eyes, 












New York, 


June 21 


Diseased, 




Aug. 
do 


8 m. 




Boston, 


do 21 


do 




8 








do 25 Healthy, 




do 


8 







22 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan, 



TABLE- 









Came 


Iso. 


Name. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 
State. 


Vessel or Eailroael. 


183 


Robinson, Ann 


27 


Worcester, 


Worcester, 






184 


Manwell, Wm. B. 


1 


do 


do 






185 


Conney, William 


45 


Ireland, 


do 


1816 


- 


186 


Robinson, Daniel 


72 


New York, 


do 


1814 




187 


Rushton, Benjamin 


75 


England, 


do 


1825 




188 


Fitzpatrick, John 


76 


Ireland, 


do 


1851 




189 


Conklin, Sarah 


73 


Oxford, Ct. 


do 


1846 




190 


Blankenham, C. 


43 


Germany, 


do 


1850 




191 


Kidd, Richard 


42 


New Jersey, 


do 


1851 




192 


Neal, John B. 


43 


England, 


do 


1848 




193 


Fogarty, Michael 


15 


Ireland, 


do 






194 


Hunt, Charles 


35 




do 






195 


Holms, Eugene 


9 mo 


Worcester, 


do 






196 


Flynn, Winfred, 


22 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 


North America, 


197 


Day, John 


70 


England, 


do 


1854 




198 


Lovely, Michael 


19 


Canada, 


do 






199 


Wiley, John 


21 


Germany, 


do 






200 


Partie, Joseph, 


22 


Spain, 


do 


1853 




201 


Edwards, James 


43 


Ireland, 


do 


1834 




202 


Cary, Patrick 


35 


do 


do 


1846 




203 


Orman, Martha 


40 


England, 


do 


1854 


Atlas, 


204 


Orman, Mary, 


10 


do 


do 


1854 


do 


205 


Orman, John 


9 


do 


do 


1854 


do 


206 


Orman, James 


5 


do 


do 


1854 


do 


207 


Worcester, James 


8 mo 


Worcester, 


do 






208 


Jenkins, Ellen 


2 


Springfield, 


do 






209 


Jenkins, Mary 


3 


do 


do 






210 


Peters, Georgiana 


7 




do 






211 


Fitzpatrick, Cathar'e 


19 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 


* 


212 


McCormick, Patrick 


64 


do 


do 


1848 




213 


McCarty, John 


30 


do 


do 






214 


Frizzell, Martha 


32 


do 


do 


1834 




215 


Conway, John 


39 


do 


do 


1847 




216 


Green, Elizabeth 


25 


do 


do 


1839 




217 


Bennett, Caroline 


1 


Vermont, 


do 






218 


Dudee, James 


35 


Ireland, 


do 


1844 




219 


Dudee, Daniel 


7 


New Worcester, 


do 






220 


Dudee, Mary Ann 


5 


Norwich, Ct., 


do 






221 


Dudee, Ellen 


2 


Thompsonville, 


do 




- 


222 


Allen, Frederic 


80 


Suffield, Ct., 


Becket, 


1784 




223 


White, Julia 


7 


Worcester, 


Sturbridge, 






224 


Andrews, Sarah 


96 


Lansingburg, 


Ludlow, 






225 


Powers, Lavinia 


91 


Colchester, Ct., 


do' 


1807 




226 


Chadwick, Veranus 


64 


Weston, 


. do 






227 


Welch, Thomas 


22 


Ireland, 


Chicopee, 


1853 


David Clinton, 


228 


Sullivan, John 


38 


do 


do 


1853 




229 


Brown, Julia 


32 


do 


do 


1847 




230 


Brown, John 


2 


Newburyport, 


do 






231 


Brown, Julia 


6 mo 


do 


do 






232 


Brosnane, Thomas 


18 


Ireland, 


do 


1853 


American Union, 


233 


Grogum, Jeremiah 


51 


do 


do 


1852 




234 


Fitzpatrick, James 


65 


do 


do 


1818 




235 


Gorman, Mary 


20 


do 


No'thbridge, 


1849 


Plymouth Rock, 


236 


Gorman, Mary 2d 


2 


Northbridge, 


do 






237 


Gorman, Catharine 


3 mo 


do 


do 






238 


Bercume, Peter 


64 


Canada, 


Leicester, 


1837 


Boston, 


239 


Doyle, John 


69 


Ireland, 


do 


1853 


Norwich, 


240 


Pollard, Thomas 


74 


Halifax, 


do 


1842 


New York, 


241 


Fallen, Thomas 


71 


Ireland, 


do 


1834 




242 


Brown, William 


32 


Scotland, 


Lonsm'dow, 


1854 




243 


Olds, Harvev 


35 




do 






244 


Baker, Phebe 


70 


Rhode Island, 


Blandford, 


1789 




245 


Henry, Wise 


8 


Connecticut, 


do 






246 Burke, Julia 


1 


Deerfield, 


Deerfield, 







1855.] 



SENATE— No. 14. 



23 







Continued. 








Via. 


Admitted 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd 


Eemarks. 




" 


May 16 
do 16 


Nursing, 
Healthy, 






m. 




Boston, 


do 16 
do 16 


Diseased, 
Infirm, 




July 6 


m. 
m. 




New York, 


do 16 


do 






m. 




Boston, 


do 16 
do 16 


Diseased, 
Insane, 


Sept. 4 




m. 




Norwich, 


do 16 
do 16 
do 16 
do 16 
do 16 
do 19 


do 

do 

do 

Idiotic, 

Insane, 

Feeble, 




Aug. 25 


m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 

m. 
m. 




Boston, 


June 6 


Ship fever, 




Aug. 12 


m. 




do 


do 7 


Infirm, 




June 21 


m. Absc. 






July 11 


Masturbation, 


Oct. 7 




m. 






do 11 


do 




Aug. 27 


m. Absc. 






do 11 


Insane, 






m. 




Albany, 


do 18 


Debauchery, 




do 30 


m. 




New York, 


do 24 


Phthisis, 


Nov. 15 




m. • 




Boston, 


do 25 


Well, 




Aug. 29 


m. Absc. 




do 


do 25 


do 










do 


do 25 


do 






na- 




do 


do 25 


do 






na. 






Aug. 3 


do 


Sept. 19 




m. 






do 3 














do 3 


do 












do 3 


do 




Sept. 12 






New York, 


do 12 


Pregnant, 










Albany, 


do 12 


Pulmonary, 


Nov. 5 




m. 






do 16 


Inj. on railroad, 


Aug. 17 




m. 




Boston, 


do 19 


Debauched, 




Oct. 10 






do 


Oct. 2 


Diseased, 






m. 




do 


do 31 
do 31 
Nov. J.1 
do 11 
do 11 
do 11 


do 
Well, 
Foot hurt, 
Well, 

do 

do 




Nov. 25 


m. 
m. 






May 18 


Feeble, 


Aug. 20 




m. 






do 20 


Healthy, 












do 20 


Infirm, 












do 20 


do 












Oct. 25 


do 






m. 




New York, 


May 22 


Consumptive, 


May 31 




m. 






July 11 


Hand injured, 




Oct. 27 


m. 




do 


do 25 
do 25 
do 25 


Well, 
do 
do 






i 

m. 




do 


A.ug. 25 


Scrofulous, 


Nov. 29 




m. 




do 


Sept. 22 


Well, 






m. 




Stonington, 


Oct. 27 


Diseased, 






m. 




Boston, 


May 24 
do 24 
do 24 


Lame, 
























do 24 


Phthisic, 




Sept. 4 


m. 






do 24 


Pulmonary, 






m. 






do 24 








m. 




Boston, 


July 31 


Blind, 




Aug. 4 


m. 




New York, 


May 24 
Dct. 16 

May 29 
do 29 


Diseased, 

do 
Ugly, 
Deaf and dumb, 


Sept. 23 


June 7 


m. Absc. 
m. 

m. 




* 


do 29 


Healthy, 











:24 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 

TABLE— 



[J 



ail. 













Came 




No 


Name. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 

State. 


Vessel or Kailroad. 


247| Barry, Samuel 


73 


Coleraine, 


Petersham, 






24S,Houilan, Martin 


11 


New York, 


do 






249 Gardner, John 


33 


Ireland, 


Uxbridge, 


1852 




250 Mellen, Patrick 


34 


do 


do 


1840 


Steamer, 


713 Lanehan, Margaret 


22 


do 


do i 


1849 




714 


Lanehan, Tommy 


6 mo 


Rhode Island, 


do 






251 


Taylor, Margaret 




State Almsh'se, 


Monson, 






252 


Fitzgerald, Bridget 




do 


do 






253 


Collier, 




do 


i do 






254 


Cummings, Cath'e B. 




do 


do 


1 




255 


Quinningham, 




do 


do 






256 


Sullivan, John 


30 


Ireland, 


do 


/ 




257 


Dovovan, m. 




State Almsh'se, 


do 






258 


Hackett, Mary Burk 




do 


do 




x 


259 


Murphy, Patrick 




do 


do 






260 


Ryan, Mary Ann 




do 


do 






261 


Ryam, 




do 


do 


/ 




262 


Goodhue, 




do 


do 






263 


Calnane, Eliza 


30 


Ireland, 


do 






264 


Calmane, Cornelius 


8 


Springfield, 


do 






265 


Garigan, m. 




State Almsh'se, 


do 






266 


Porter, Chamberlain 




do 


do 






267 


Andrews, Betsy E. 


20 


Connecticut, 


do 






268 


Smith, Charles 


3 


Warren, 


Warren, 




■ 


269 


O'ISeal, Ann 


25 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 




270 


Cunningham, Mary 
Casey, Patrick 


21 


do 


Dalton, 


1852 




271 


47 


do 


Royalston, 


1845 


Henderson, 


272 


Tanner, Caroline 


40 


Pennsylvania, 


Lenox, 


1822 


^ 


273 


Donia], James 


20 


Ireland, 


Millbury, 


1854 


Chapin, 


274 


Wilson, Martha 


79 


do 


do 


1846 




275 


Babcock, Russell 


43 


Rhode Island, 


do 


1843 




276 


Wilson, Wm. G. 


24 


Scotland, 


do 


1854 




277 


Clark, Esther 


60 


Ireland, 


do 


1830 


Brunswick, 


278 


Sullivan, Edmund 


1 




W. Br'kfi'ld, 


• 




279 


Jacobs, Mary 


30 


England, 


N. Br'kfi'ld, 


1853 




280 


Jacobs, Charles 


7mo 


N. Brookfield, 


do 






231 


Young, Alex. 


50 


Canada, 


Brookfield, 


1853 


\ 


282 


Young, Jane 


10 


Vermont, 


do 


1853 




283 


Young, Samuel 


9 


do 


do 


1853 




284 


Young, Edwards 


7 


do 


do 


1853 




285 


McCollough, Charles 
Mahony, Dennis 


11 


Boston, 


Rainsford I. 






286 


8 


[reland, 


do 






287 


Carlin, John 


7 


Boston, 


do 






288 


Baker, Fritz 


6 


Germany, 


do 






289 


Baker, Henrich 


8 


do " 


do 






290 


Carigan, Morrice 


6 


Boston, 


do 






291 


Griffeth, Cornelius 


6 


do 


do 






292 


Gonan, James 


5 


do 


do 






293 


Joyce, Patrick 


7 


do 


do 






294 McKeever, Maria 


8 


[reland,, 


do 






295 1 Seattle, Maria 


8 


[ihode Island, 


do . 






296 Doyle, John 


9 


Lawrence, 


do 






297 Boyle, Sarah 


12 


Roxbury, 


do 






298 Sullivan, Timothy 


5 


Boston, 


do 






299 McNutty, Abigail 


3 


do 


■ do 






300 


Mahony, Daniel 


3 


do 


do 






301 


McNutty, Bridget 


13 


do 


do 






302 


McCann, Austin 


2 


do 


do 






303 


Boyle, Thomas 


2 


do 


do 


* 




304 


Kane, Thomas 


Q 


do 


do 






305 


Smith, Angeline 


1 


do 


do 






300 


Dooley, John 


4 


do 


do 






307 


Davis, David 


2 


do 


do 






308 


Breslahan, James 


2 


do 


do 







1855.] 



senate—No. 14. 



25 



Continued. 



Via, 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd. 


Remarks. 




May 30 


Blind, diseased, 




Oct. 


19 


m. 






Nov. 17 


Vagrant, 








m. 




N. Y. & Albany, 


May 31 


Diseased liver, 


Aug. 6 






m. 




Boston, 


July 24 


Phthisic, 


Nov. 8 






m. 




do 


Nov. 30 
do 30 
May 9 


Debilitated, 
Well, 








m. 






do 23 


No pallet, 




June 


8 








June 1 


Healthy, 




Oct. 


16 








do 2 


do 














do 25 






do 


30 








July 11 


Insane, dumb, 








m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 




July 27 












Aug. 5 






Nov. 


22 


m. 






do 17 


Well, 




do 


29 


m. 






do 17 


do 














Sept. 1 
















do 12 


Pregnant, 














do 12 


Well, 








m. 






do 18 










m. 






Nov. 6 










m. 






do 8 


Imbecile, 




Nov. 


10 








June 1 


Diseased, 








m. 




New York, 


Aug. 30 


do 




Oct. 


31 






do 


June 1 


Insane, 












Quebec, 


do 1 
do 2 


Ophthalmia, 
Fits, 






m. 


m. 




Boston, 


do 6 


Unwell, 








m. 




do 


do 6 


[nfirm, 














do 24 


Diseased lungs, 




July 


24 m. 






Sept. 6 






Oct. 


2 m. 






Nov. 17 


Diseased, infirm, 














June 6 


Healthy, 




June 


29 


m. 




New York, 


do 13 


Well, 














do 13 


do 




Sept. 


1 


m. 






do 26 






do 


1 


m. 






do 26 
















do 26 










m. 






do 26 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 
















do 6 
















do 6 










m. 






do 6 
















do 6 










m. 






do 6 
















do 6 










m. 






do 6 
















do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 






do 6 
















do 6 










m. 


, 




do 6 










m. 






do 6 










m. 





26 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



TABLE— 













Came 




No. 


Name. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 
State. 


Vessel or Railroad. 


309 


Murphy, Martin 


3 


Boston, 


Rainsford I. 






310 


Murphy, Mary J. 


3 


do 


do 






311 


McNutty, Catharine 


10 


do 


do 






312 


Carlin, Thomas 


5 


Cambridge, 


do 






313 


Shea, Perez 


10 


Boston, 


do 






314 


Scannell, Lawrence 


2 


Charleston, 


do 






315 Watt, William 


6 


Ireland, 


do 






316 


Cook, Martin 


8 


Boston, 


do 






317 


Boyle, John 


3 


do 


do 






318 


Brown, William 


7 


St. John's, 


do 






319 


Hipson, James 


5 


Boston, 


do 






320 


Turner, John 


2 


Nova Scotia, 


do 






321 


Jones, Charles 


4 


Boston, 


do 






322 


Barnacle, John 


5 


do 


do 






323 


Price, Margaret 


4 


do 


do 






324 


Fitzgibbon, Hannah 


5 


Ireland, 


do 


1851 




325 


Moore, Lucy 


5 


Boston, 


do 






326 


Hipson, Mary A. 


2 


do 


do 






327 


Reddin, Mary A. 


3 


do 


do 






328 


Burke, Mary A. 


4 


Maine, 


do 






329 


Moore, Ellen 


16 


Cape Breton, 


do 


1841 




330 


Daly, Patrick 


31 


Ireland, 


Southboro', 


1847 


Western Star, 


331 


Cavin, John, Jr. 


17 


do 


do 


1853 


Liverpool, 


710 


Murphy, Lawrence 
Nilan, Thomas 




do 


do 




Blanchard, 


332 


42 


do 


Westboro', 


1853 


Terall, 


333 


Daisy, Francis, 
Smith, William 


4 




do 






334 


7 




do 






335 


Hazard, Benjamin 


90 


Connecticut, 


Westfield, 






336 


Magee, James 
Welden, Michael 


28 


Ireland, 


do 


1853 




337 


2 


England, 
Ireland, 


do 


1852 


x 


338 


Kelley, Patrick 


9 


do 






339 


Nelson, Edward 


33 


do 


do 


1845 




340 


Sweeny, Margaret 


2 


Westfield, 


do 






341 


Lynch, Catharine 
Flandin, Alexander 


17 


Ireland, 


do 


1850 




342 


29 


France, 


do 


1854 




343 


Atkinson, James 


28 


England, 


do 


1848 




344 


Barry, John 


23 


Ireland, 


do 


1853 


New Hampshire, 


345 Quinningham, S. 


24 


England, 


Sutton, 


1851 




346 


Quinningham, Mary 


2 


New York, 


do 






347 


Abbell, Joseph 


42 


Ley den, 


Leyden, 






348 


Abbell, Ruth 


82 


Connecticut, 


do 


1774 




349 


Still, Welcome 


49 


Hardwich, 


Shutesbury, 






350 


Summers, Eliza 


19 


Ireland, 


Gardner, 


1853 


Chas. Humbeton, 


351 


Summers, Georgiana 


10 w 


Gardner, 


do 






352 


Ralph, Henry B. 


14 


Ireland, 


Tewksbury, 






353 


Cook, Charles 


11 


Saxonville, 


do 






354 


O'Bryne, John 


14 


Ireland, 


do 






355 


McShane, Barney 


12 


Boston, 


do 






356 


Fitzgerald, John 


10 


do 


do 






357 


Desmond, John 


12 


do 


do 






358 


Partridge, James 


10 


do 


do 






359 


Dunn, Andrew 


10 


do 


do 






360 


McCarty, John 
Marshall, Thomas 


11 


do 


do 






361 


11 


do 


do 






362 


Harrison, John H. 


12 


do 


do 






363 


Trainer, Francis 


9 


do 


do 






364jCasey, David 


13 


do 


do 






365JDonelly, John 


11 


Waltham, 


do 






366 Cariean, James 


12 


St. John's, 


do 






367 


Scott, John 


13 


Ireland, 


do 






368 


McCollough, C. 


12 


do 


do 






369 


Galvin, Patrick 


10 


do 


do 






370 


Marsh, Laurie 


9 


do 


do 






371 


Sullivan, James 


11 


do 


do 







1855. 



SENATE— No. 14. 



27 



Continued. 



Via. 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd. 


Remarks. 






June 6 










m. 






do 6 
















do 6 
















do 6 










m. 




1 


do 6 










m. 






Nov. 24 










m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 










m. 






do 24 
















do 24 
















do 24 
















do 24 
















do 24 
















do 24 
















do 24 














Boston, 


June 19 


Pulmonary, 




Aug. 


30 m. Absc. 




New York, 


do 19 


Broken leg, 




Sept. 


11 


m. do 




Boston, 


Nov. 27 










m. 




do 


June 19 
Oct. 26 
do 26 
June 7 


Diseased, 
Well, 
Diseased, 
Infirm and lame, 




July 


20 


m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 




Quebec, 


do 7 
do 7 
do 7 
do 7 
do 7 


Dropsy, 

Well, 

Eyes, 

do 
Well, 


Nov. 7 






m. 

m. 
m. 

m. 




Canada, 


Aug. 26 


Digestive dis., 














Sept. 19 Intermit't fever, 




Nov. 


25 


m. 




Boston, 


Oct. 25Sick, 






14 


m. Absc. 




New York, 


Nov. 18 Vagrant, 








in. 




do 


June 14 


Pregnant, 
Well, 




Oct. 


30 








do 14 


Aug. 26 












do 14 


Imbecile, 


Oct. 22 






m. 






do 14 


Debilitated, 


Aug. 7 












do 15 


Lame, 








m. 




Boston, 


do 19 


Healthy, 




Aug. 


30 








do 19 


do 




do 


30 








do 19 






Oct. 


26 


m. Indentured. 






do 19 






Nov. 


14 


m. 






do 19 






Oct. 


6 


m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 






do 


2 


m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 






July 


11 


m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 






do 


11 


m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 






Oct. 


26 


m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 










m. 






do 19 










m. 





28 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



TABLE— 



1 








Came 




So. Name. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 
State. 


Vessel or Railroad. 


372 Mahony, Jeremiah 


12 


Ireland, 


Tewksbury, 






373;Marrh, James 


60 


do 


do 






374!Winn, Thomas 


11 


East Boston, 


do 






375j Hayes, Michael 


11 


New York, 


do 






376 


Reynolds, Charles 


12 


Ireland, 


do 






377 


Best, Andrew 


10 


Boston, 


do 






378 


Morris, Thomas 


11 


Halifax, 


do 






379! Kane, Patrick 


9 


St. John's, 


do 






380j Gerry, Wm. T. 


11 


Ireland, 


do 






381 Stone, Michael 


11 


do 


do 






382!McCarty, Michael 


11 


do 


do 






383 Greehee, Wm. J. 


11 


do 


do 






384] Call, James 


11 


Boston, 


do 






385 Scott, Patrick 


11 


do 


do 






386 


Sandlin, John 


10 


Roxbury, 


do 






387 


Graham, Michael 


10 


Ireland, 


do 






388 


Leavitt, John 


10 


do 


do 






389 


Alstine, Van Rens'lr 


9 


Charleston, 


do 






390 


Shea, Thomas 


10 


Ireland, 


do 






391 


Kelley, James 


9 


Boston, 


do 






392 Devine, Robert 


11 


do 


do 






393 Lyons, William 


10 


Ireland, 


do 






394j Haley, John 


8 


Boston, 


do 






395jLaughlin, James 


9 


do 


do 






396;Martin, John 


9 


do 


do 






397|Carty, Thomas 
398|Dugan, Thomas 


10 
8 


do 
do 


do 
do 






399 Powell, James 


10 


St. John's, 


do 






400jCampbell, James 


10 


Canada, 


do 






401iCrosby, Thomas 


9 


Halifax, 


do 






402:Quinn, John 


11 


Boston, 


do 






403jCasey, John 


10 


do 


do 






404 Parks, Matthew 


10 


Ireland, 


do 






405:Delany, Daniel 


10 


Boston, 


do 






406:Peacock, Joseph 


10 


England, 


do 






407|Humm, George 


9 


do 


do 






408'McCarty, Dennis 


10 


Ireland, 


do 






409! Daley, Daniel 


10 


do 


do 






410 Mahony, Dennis 


8 


do 


do 






411:McMullen, John 


9 


do 


do 






412 Cook, Thomas 


11 


Saxonville, 


do 






413 O'Bryne, Wm. 


9 


New York, 


do 






4l4:Haley, Edward 


8 


Boston, 


do 






415!Kane, Daniel 


9 


Ireland, 


do 






416 Murphy, Wm. 


9 


do 


do 






417 Sullivan, Eugene 


6 


Lowell, 


do 






418 Miller, James 


8 


St. John's, 


do 






419'McCullough, James 


8 


Boston, 


do 






420 Leddy, Wm. 


8 


Ireland, 


do 






421|Driscoll, John 


8 


England, 


do 






422|0'Donnell, John 


6 


St. John's, 


do 






423;McAvena, Daniel 


7 


Boston, 


do 






424! Kane, Henry 


7 


do 


do 






425 i Gal vin, Robert 


8 


Ireland, 


do 






426;Connel, Henry 


8 


do 


do 






427|Alstine, Amos 


6 Charleston. 


do 






428Rearding, Daniel 


7 


E. Boston, 


do 






429 Shay, Richard 


7 


Halifax, 


do 






430| Murphy, Geo. H. 


8 


England, 


do 






431 McCartv, Daniel 


9 


Boston, 


do 






432; Kane, Daniel 


9 


Cincinnati, 


do 






433| Haley, Morris 


8 


Boston, 


do 






434 Lyons, John 


7 


St. John's, 


do 






435 


Moore, Patrick 


8 


Lowell, 


do 







1855. 



SENATE— No. 14. 



29 



Continued. 



Via. 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd. 


RemarKs. 




June 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






July 29 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Oct. 26 


m. 






do 19 






Sept. 26 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Sept. 26 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m^ 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Oct. 2 


m. 






do 19 








in. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






July 11 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








ra. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






do 29 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 


- 




do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Aug. 2 


ra. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Nov. 14 


m. 






do 19 






Oct. 6 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19. 






Sept. 1 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Aug. 2 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








ra. 






do 19 






July 29 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Aug. 25 


ra. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 





30 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



TABLE— 



Kame. 



Age. 



Birthplace. 



From. 



Came 



Ve6sel or Railroad. 



436 Russell, John 

437 Campbell, William 

438 Morris, William 
439 ! Short, Peter 
440 Baldwin, Edward 
441 1 Lyons, Wm. D. 
442|Sandlin, William 
443 j Fife, Michael 
444!0'Neil, John 
445JDolan, Michael 
446 1 Ray, James 

447 Durgan, George 
448; Davis, Chas. J. 
449Canaly, James 
450jO'Bryne, Daniel 
451 j Partridge, Joseph 
452, Cunningham, D. 
453jFreeman, Wm. F. 

454 Carty, James 

455 Walker, Maria 

456 Lucy, Catharine 

457 Galvin, Mary 

458 Galvin, John 
459{ Galvin, Maria 

460 j Galvin, Johanna 

461 Galvin, Ann 

462 Galvin, Caroline 
463|Whalin, Bridget 
464| Whalin, Margaret 
465; Whalin, Julia 
466 Whalin, Michael 
467 j Whalin, Thomas 
468 Whalin, Mary 
469jKoopman, Mary E. 
470|Koopman, Henry 

•471jKoopman, John 
472 Koopman, Cath'e J 
473|Pike, Jane A. 
474! Pike, Catharine 

475 Collins, Mary, 

476 j Collins, Daniel 
477|Collins, Bridget 
478jCollins, Andrew 
479! Collins, Mark 

480 ; Mitchell, Mary A. ■ 
481jHeffron, Margaret 
482JGilligan, Patrick 
483|Ford, Daniel 
484! Hackett, Mary 
485 Boyle, Thomas W. 
486 ; Beamish, John 

487 j Bancroft, Charles 

488 Pritchard, Mary J. 

489 Hutchinson, Andrew 
490;Clark, Jane 
49l!McKenna, James 
492; Barry, John 
493 Duffy, Patrick 
494;Devine, John 

495 Cunningham, Dennis 

496 Cunningham, James 
497,Goodhue, Daniel 
498; Goodhue, George 
499,'K:ane, Patrick 



Ireland, 
Canada, 
Nova Scotia 
Lowell, 
Boston, 

do 

do 
Ireland, 
New York, 



Roxbury, 

Boston, 

New York, 

Ireland, 

Boston, 

New York, 

Ireland, 

Salem, 

Boston, 

Williamstown, 

Ireland, 

do 

do 

do - 

do 

do 

do 

do 
New Brunswick 

do 

do 

do 

do 
New York, 

do 

do 

do 

22 ! Maine, 
7 mo 'Boston, 



Ireland, 
Boston, 

do 

do 

do 
Ireland, 

do 

do 
New Hampshire 
Ireland, 
Newburyport 



Salem, 
do 
do 

Ireland, 



50 
11 

9 

7 

5 

25 
20 
27 
14 
21 

2 

3 

3 

2 

1| 

24 
28 
1^' Boston, 



do 
do 
do 
do 

Lowell, 
do 

Boston. 



Tewksbury, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1855.] 



SENATE— No. 14. 



31 



Continued. 



Via. 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd. 


Bern arks. 




June 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






July 29 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








HI, 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Oct. 6 m. 






do 19 






do 2 m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






July 21 


m. 






do 19 






Aug. 3 


Abac. 






do 19 














do 19 














do 19 








m. 






do 19 














do 19 














do 19 














do 19 














do 19 


• 












do 19 














do 19 














do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 














do 19 














do 19 








in. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 














do 19 






July 29 








do 19 




July 28 






* 




do 19 






Sept. 27 








do fr 






Oct. 10 


ra. 






do 19 






do 10 








do 19 






do 10 


m. 






do 19 






do 10 


ra. 






do 19 














do 19 




Aug. 22 










do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Sept. 27 








do 19 








m. 






do 19 








in. 






do 19 








ra. 






do 19 














do 19 








ra. 






do 19 






do 1 








do 19 






July 20 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Aug. 25 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 





32 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



TABLE- 







Came 




Ko. 


Xame. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 

State. 


Vessel or Railroad. 


500 


Kelley, John 


3 


Ireland, 


Tewksbury, 






501 


Lamed, Anthony 


7 


do 


do 






502 


McCleary, Daniel 


3 




do 






503 


McGennis, Magnis 


6 


Roxbury, 


do 






504 


Myers, George W. 


6 


Boston, 


do 






505 


Luke, Phillips 


3 mo 


Salem, 


do 






506 


Phillips, John 


3 do 


do 


do 






507 


Reynolds, Michael 


7 


Ireland, 


do 






50S 


Shannerha, "William 


5 


Boston, 


do 






509 


Martin, Wilkins E. 


6 


Brighton, 


do 






510 


Short, Thomas 


4 


Lowell, 


do 






511 


Bacon, James 


3 


do 


do 






512 


Barry, James 


4 


Boston, 


do 






513 


Jones, Thomas 


74 


Ireland, 


do 






514 


Haggerty, John 


70 


do 


do 






515 


McGuire, Ann 


45 


Boston, 


do 






516 


McGuire, Mary Ann 


14 


do 


do 






517 


McGuire, Ellen 


11 


do 


do 






518 


McGuire, Bridget 


8 


do 


do 






519 


Young, Hugh 


67 


Ireland, 


do 






520 


Young, Ann 






do 






521 


Nugent, Ellen 


34 


do 


do 






522 


Nugent, Michael 


10 


Connecticut, 


do 






523 


Nugent; Margaret 


6 


do 


do 






524 


Nugent, James 


3 


Salem, 


do 






525 


Nugent, Jeremiah 


9imo 


do 


do 






526 


Ryan, Mary 


20 


Ireland, 


do , 






527 


Ray, Jane 


32 


do 


do 






528 


Ray, David 


3 mo 


Tewksbury, 


do 






529 


Delany, Hannah, 


14 


Boston, 


do 






530 


Haley, John 


17 


Ireland, 


do 






531 


Dean, John 


10 


do 


do 






532 


McGran, Patrick 


12 


do 


do 






533 


Devine, James 


9 


do 


do 






534 O'JBryne, John 


8 


do 


do 






SSojCampbell, Margaret 


8 


do 


do 






536 Kane, Catharine 


8 


do 


do 






537 


Russell, Sarah 


8 


do 


do 






538 


Campbell, Mary D. 


24 


Lawrence, Me., 


do 






539 


Flynn, George 






do 






540 


Murphy, James 






do 






541 


Ghaliger, Michael 




Ireland, 


do 






542 


Brown, James 


75 


do 


do 






543 


Barry, Mary Ann 


5 


do 


do 






544 


Roach, Moses 


40 


do 


do 






545 


Fitzgerrold, Dennis 


70 


do 


do 






546 


Peacock, Edward 


10 


England, 


do 






547 


Stephens, James 


6 


Boston, 


do 






548 


Ryan, Ellen 


9 


Ireland, 


do 






549 


Sullivan, Catharine 






do 






550 


Kane, Mary Ann 


6 


do 


do 






551 


Bernard, William 






do 






552 


Baker, 






do 






553 


Wilson, John 






do 






554 


Shallihan, 






do 






555 


Lee, Mary 




England, 


do 






556 


Aline, Alex. Robert 






do 






557 


Devine, George, 


2 




do 






558 


Quigley, Thomas 


3 


Salem, 


do 






559 


Blamming, Anthony 
O'Donnell, William 


18 


Boston, 


do 






560 


3 


St. John's, 


do 




I 


561 


Newton, Daniel 






do 






562 


Chiverton, Elizabeth 


37 


New York, 


do 


1849 




563 


Saunders, William 


25 


Ireland, 


do 


1851 





1855.] 




SENATE- 


-No. 


14. 




33 




Continued. 




Via. 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd. 


Remarks. 




June 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








in. 






do 19 






Sept. 21 


m. 






do 19 




Sept. 6 




m. 






do 19 


Aug. 31 




m. 






do 19 






rn. 






do 19 






in. 




• 


do 19| 




do 11 


m. 






do 19! 






m. 






do 19 






m. 






do 19 






m. 






do 19 






m. 






do 19 




Aug. 30 


ra. 






do 19 














do 19 














do 19 














do 19 














do 19 




Aug. 5 


m. 






do 19 














do 19 














do 19 








m. 






do 19 














do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 














do 19 














do 19 








m. 






do 19 












do 19 






Sept. 1 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






July 4 


m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 




Aug. 25 


m. 






do 19 














do 19 














do 19 














do 19 






do 3 








do 19 








m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 








in. 






do 19 




do 11 




m. 






do 19 






Nov. 10 




. 




do 19 
do 19 






July 3 


m. 
m. 






do 19 
do 19 






July [29 


m. 
m. 






do 19 








m. 






do 19 






Sept. 1 


m. 






do 19 






Nov. 7 








do 19 








m. 






do 19 
do 19 
do 19 
do 19 
do 19 
do 19 
do 19 
do 19 
do 19 
do 19 
Nov. 15 
do 15 




1 




m. 

m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 

m. 





34 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. * 



[Jan. 



TABLE- 













Came 




No. 


Name. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 
State. 


Vessel or Railroad. 


564 


Riley, Ellen 


25 


Ireland, 


Tewksbury, 


1849 




565 


Denny, Richard 


57 


do 


do 


1852 




566lOneil, Cornelius 


30 


do 


do 


1850 




567 Wallace, Sarah 


31 


England, 


do 


1846 




568 Barry, Ann 


10 


Boston, 


do 


1851 




569 


Barry, Eliza 


5h 


do 


do 






570 


Barry, John 


7 


Ireland, 


do 






571 


Barry, Mary 


3 


Boston, 


do 






572 


McCoy, Agnes 
Reardon, Johannah 


26 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 




573 


25 


do 


do 






574 


Lowrey, Sarah 


20 


do 


do 


1850 




575 


Shea, Jane 


24 


do 


do 


1852 




576 


Green, Maria 


-20 


South America, 


do 


1851 




577 


Tooney, Michael 


1 


Boston, 


do 






578 


Tooney, Honora 


30 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 




579 


Donnovan, Daniel 


68 


do 


do 


1836 




580 


Whalin, John 


55 


do 


do 


1834 




581 


Cunningham, Mary 


37 


do 


do 


1849 




582 


Cunningham, Mary 


8 


do 


do 


1849 




583 


Jackson, Luke 


68 


do 


do 


1796 




584 


McLaughlin, John 


10 


Boston, 


do 






585 


McLaughlin, John 


35 


Ireland, 


do 






586 


McLaughlin, Marg't 


4i 


Boston, 


do 






587 


McLaughlin, Eliza'th 


3 


do 


do 






588 


Andrews, Mary A. 


20 




do 






589 


Powers, Bridget 


30 


New Brunswick, 


do 






590 


Dougherty, John 


10 


do 


do 






591 


Dougherty, James 


6 


Boston, 


do 






592 


Dougherty, Ellen 


8 


do 


do 






593 


Dougherty, Sarah 


4 


do 


do 






594 


Riley, Timothy 


8 


do 


1 






595 


Riley, Cornelius 


5 


do 








596 


Riley, Maurice 


10 


do 








597 


Hinds, George 


7 


do 








598 


Murray, Margaret 


43 


Ireland, 








599 


Ford, Patrick 


14 


do 




1851 




600 


Murphy, John 


17 


St. John's, 




1851 




601 


Fitzgerrold, Joseph 


17 


Lowell, 








602 


STewell, Mary 


16 


Boston, 








603 


Dolvin, Eliza 


29 


Canada, 




1854 




604 


O'Connell, Mary 


24 


Ireland, 




1841 




605 


Casey, Mary 


15 


do 




1853 




606 


Smith, Charles 


25 


do 




1851 




607 


Smith, Catharine 


21 


do 




1854 




608 


Carr, Francis 


28 


do 




1851 




609 


Mahony, John 


21 


do 




1854 




610 


Bohannan, Michael 


20 


Nova Scotia, 




1854 




611 


Dolton, John 


14 


Boston, 








612 


Fox, Patrick 


15 


Ireland, 




1845 




613 


Dow, Ann 


25 


' do 








614 


Green, Margaret 


26 


England, 




1839 




615 


Healy, Catharine 


40 


Ireland, 




1854 




616 


Healy, Daniel 


9 


do 




1854 




617 


Faulkner, Mary J. 


34 


do 




1852 




618 


Faulkner, Mary 


5 


Cambridge, 


* 






619 


Mellon, John, 


50 


Ireland, 








620 


Mellon, Rosanna 


37 


do 








621 


Wallace, Patrick 


9 


do 








622 


O'Neal, Michael 


54 


do 




1849 




623 


Clark, Patrick 


6 


do 








624 


Flynn, Michael 


5 


Boston, 


Tewksbury, 
do 






625 


Mahon, Hugh 


54 


Ireland, 






626 


Mahon, Bridget 


50 


do 


do 






627 


Mahon, Catharine 


15 


do 


do 







1855.1 



SENATE— No. 14. 



35 



Continued. 



Via. 



Admitted. 



Disease or 
Condition. 



Died. Disc'rg'd 



Remarks 



Nov. 15 
do 15 



do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 


do 


15 



Nov. 16 m . Absc. 

do 16j m . do 

do 16i m . do 



m. 

Dec. 1 

Nov. 16 m . 
do 16! m 
do 16 m . 



36 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan, 



TABLE- 













Came 1 


2s 0. 


Xarae. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in I Vessel or Railroad. 
State. 


628 Mahon, Bridget 


13 


Ireland, 


Tewksbury, 


1 


629 


Mahon, Margaret 


6 


Holliston, 


do 




630 


Mahon, Elizabeth 


4 


do 


do 


1 


631 


Mahon, Ann 


6 mo 


do 


do 


| 


632 


Lennon, Margaret 


28 


Ireland, 


do 




633 


Lyons, Henry 


6 


Boston, 


do 




634 


McNeil, Margaret 


40 


Ireland, 


do 




635 


McNeil, Donald 


18 


do 


do 




636 


McNeil, James 


8 


do 


do 






637 


McNeil, Christy 


6 


do 


do 






638 


Carigan, Patrick 


35 


do 


do 






639 


Murray, Patrick 


27 


do 


do 






640 


Sullivan, Mary 


22 


do 


do 






641 


McGinty, John 


26 


do 


do 






642 


McCafferty, Cathar'e 


40 


do 


do 






643 


Lyons, Elizabeth 


17 


Danvers, 


do 






644 


Deering, John 


7 


Lynn, 


do 






645 


Brazil/Michael 


5 




Stockbridge, 






646 


Brazil, Mary 


H 




do 






647 


Casey, Daniel 




Ireland, 


W. do 






648 


Gilbert, Joseph 


70 


Wash'gt'n, N.H. 


Westmins'r, 






649 


Dougherty, Fanny 


11 


Chester, 


Chester, 






650 


Tenehan, Michael 


11 


Ireland, 


Upton, 


1846 Bethel, 


651 


Tenehan, John 


5 


Boston, 


do 


1 


652 


Tenehan, Mary 


30 


Ireland, 


do 


1839 


653 


Winchell, Reuben 


42 


Egremont, 


Earremont, 


1 


654 


Race, Nancy B. 


35 


do 


do 


j 


655 


Murphy, George 


11 


Sheffield, 


do 






656 


Elliot, Francis 


15 


Boston, 


Harvard, 






657 


Grannin, Mary 


20 


Ireland, 


Douglass, 


1852 


t 


658 


Van Volkenburge, J. 


65 


Hillsdale, N. Y., 


Gt. Bar'gt'n, 


1811 




659 


Kelley, Mary Jane 


1^ 


Gt. Barrington, 


do 






660 


Kelley, Ellen E. 


H 


do 


do 






661 


Fox, Luke 


75 


Ireland, N. Y., 


do 


1848 


Leonidas, 


662 


Fox, Bridget 


75 


do 


do 


1848 


do 


663 


Van Bleek, Robert 


90 


Hillsdale, do 


do 


1814 




664 


Robbins, Nancy 


80 


N. Concord, do 


do 


1764 




665 


Jackson, Peter 


7 


Gt. Barrington, 


do . 






666 


Jackson, Eliza 


3 


do 


do 






667 


Granger, Benjamin 


83 


Southwick, 


do 






668 


Oakes, Clarissa 


29 


N. Cainan, N. Y., 


do 


1847 




669 


June, Flora 


1 


Gt. Barrington, 


do 


1853 




670 


Rogers, Lewis 


7 


Sheffield, 


Sheffield, 






671 


Seymour, Almira 


64 


do 


do 






672 


Perry, Roman 


62 


Goshen, Ct., 


do 


1840 




673 


Dean, Chester 


28 


S. Adams, 


Lanesboro', 






674 


Paro, Paul 


13 


Canada, 


Winch'nd'n, 


1847 




675 


Pownal, John 


86 


Weston, 


Southwick, 






676 


Barrell, Andrew 


72 


Thompson, Ct., 


N. Br'intree, 


1824 




677 


Gillman, Catharine 


7 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 




678 


Ring, David 


52 


Rhode Island, 


Hancock, 






679 


Hinton, Harriet 


19 


New York, 


Barre, 


1853 




680 


Kelly, Catharine 


35 


Ireland, 


Spencer, 


1849 




681 


Williams, George 


3 


Spencer, 


do 






682 


Williams, Frederic 


22 m 


do 


do 






683: Murphy, Timothy 
684 Leonard, Geo. H. 


21 


Ireland, 


do 


1854 




6 


Providence, 


Wilbraham, 


1854 




685jCoffee, Johanna 


H 


Williamsburg, 


Wil'msburg, 






686 Whalin, Bridget 


18 


Ireland, 


do 


1851 




687 Marshall, Catharine 


22 


do 


W. Sp'gfi'ld, 


1844 


St. John's, 


688 Marshall, Catharine 


4 w 


W. Springfield, 


do 






689 


Marony, Mary 




Ireland, 


Monterey, 


1846 




690 


Marony, Nancy Ann 




Monterey, 


do 






691 


Marony, girl 




do 


do 







1855." 



SENATE— No. 14. 



37 



Continued. 



Via. 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc'rg'd. 


Remarks. 




Nov. 15 














do 15 














do 15 














do 15 














do 15 














do 15 








m. 






do 15 














do 15 








m. 






do 15 








m. 






do 15 








m. 






do 15 








m. 






do 15 








in. 






do 15 




-, 










do 15 








m. 






do 15 














do 15 














do 15 








m. 






June 20 


Rickets, 






m. 






do 20 


Well, 


Aug. 9 










Oct. 13 


Fool, 






m. 






June 2 1 


Debilitated, 






m. 






do 22 


Imbecile, 










Boston, 


do 23 


Well, 




Sept. 12 


m. 






do 23 


do 




do 12 


m. 




St. John's, 


Sept. 9 
June 23 
do 23 
Oct. 16 


do 
do 






m. 
m. 






July 3 


Sick, 




Aug. 4 


m. 




New Hampshire, 


do 7 
June 23 
do 23 
do 23 


Diseased, 
Lame and infirm, 
Well, 
do 




do 30 


m. 




New York, 


do 23 Infirm, 






m. 




do 


do 23 
do 23 
do 23 
do 23 
do 23 


do 

do imbecile, 
Well, 
do 
do 






m. 
m. 




Hartford, 


to 8 ' ll 

do 10 
July 11 
do^ 11 


Idiotic, 
Well, 




Sept. 7 
do 7 


m. 

m. 






Infirm, 












do 11 


Sick, 






m. 






do 22 


Blind, 






m. 






do 28 


Idiotic, 






m. 






Aug. 2 


Well, 




Nov. 14 


m. 






do 7 


Blind, 






m. 




Boston, 


do 7 
Aug. 10 


One eye, 
Lame, 






m. 




Albany, 


do 11 


Diseased, 


Sept. 17 








New York, 


do 12 

do 24 


Pulmonary, 
Well, 






m. 






do 24 


do 


Dec. 1 




m. 




do 


Sept. 26 
Aug. 22 
Nov. 3 


Intermit't fever, 

Well, 

Eruption, 






m. 
m. 




do 


do 15 
Oct. 31 
do 31 


Diseased, 
Well, 
do 










do 


Nov. 20 
do 20 
do 20 


Debilitated, 

Well, 

Squally, 











38 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



TABLE— 



1 








Came 






KoJ 5ame. 


Age. 


Birthplace. 


From. 


in 


Vessel or Eailro; 


i 








State. 






692 Marshall, Joseph 


35 


Canada, 


Amherst, 


1854 


Fitchburg, 


RR., 


693Marshall, Rosa 


36 


do 


do 


1854 


do 




694 1 Marshall, Dority 


9 mo 


do 


do 


1854 


do 




695! Marshall, Sarah 


20 


do 


do 


1854 


do 




696iMarshall, Margaret 


12 


do 


do 


1854 


do 




697 Marshall, Almaline 


8 


do 


do 


1854 


do 




egSjMarshall, Pauline 


7 


do 


do 


1854 


do 




699 Marshall, Mary 


4 


do 


do 


1854 


do 




700 Durant, Harriet, 


26 


do 


do 


1854 


do 




701|Hickey, Philip 


30 


Ireland, 


Mendon, 


1847 






702; Ludge, Catharine 


32 


Germany, 


"Webster, 


1854 






703 Ludge, John 


6 


do 


do 


1854 






704 ; Morris, Richard 


33 


Ireland, 


do 


1834 






705jAldin, Mary 


67 


do 


Southb'dge, 


1852 






706 Cole, Stephen 


46 


Connecticut, 


"Washinet'n, 








707|Jones, William, 


14 


Vermont, 


W. Sp'gfi'ld, 








708|Hunter, Elizabeth 


24 


Scotland, 


do 


1834 


North America, 


709 Bidwell, Horace 


57 


Colebrook, Ct., 


do 


1854 






710|Marshall, John 


2 


W. Springfield, 


do 








715j Sweeny, Jeremiah 


12 


Boston, 










716 ! Murphy, David 


10 


Ireland, 










717iBlinn, Calvin 






Athol, 








719 Van Volkenburgh, C. 


110 


Albany, 


Coleraine, 









1855.] 



SENATE— No. 14. 



39 



Continued. 



Via. 


Admitted. 


Disease or 
Condition. 


Died. 


Disc' 


rg'd. 


Remarks. 


Boston, 


Sept. 16 


Well, 




Sept 


20 


' 


do 


do 16 


do 




do 


20 




do 


do 16 


do 




do 


20 




do 


do 16 


do 




do 


20 


m. French, 


do 


do 16 


do 




do 


20 


> unable to 


do 


do 16 


do 




do 


20 ! 


speak English. 


do 


do 16 


do 




do 


20 




do 


do 16 


do 




do 


20 




do 


do 16 


do 




do 


20 




New York, 


Sept. 21 


Diseased, 




Oct. 


4 


m. 




Oct. 2 


Pregnant, 




do 


12 






do 2 


Well, 




do 


12 


in. 


Canada, 


do 31 


Diseased, 








n. 


N. Y. & Boston, 


do 2 


Well, 












do 26 


do 




Nov. 


18 


m. 




Aug. 5 










m. 


Boston, 


Sept. 8 
Oct. 16 
do 31 
Nov. 4 


Diseased, 
Well, 






i 

] 


-n. 
m. 

Tl. 




do 4 








m. 




do 27 


Smallpox, 






1 


n. 




June 29 


Infirm, 











40 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSOM. 



[Jan. 



[B.] 



Cash received of the Commonwealth, . 
Cash received of all other sources, 

Whole amount expended for Provisions, 

Whole amount expended for Groceries, 

Whole amount expended for Clothing and Dry Goods 

Whole amount expended for Medicine, 

Whole amount expended for Fuel and Oil, . 

Whole amount expended for Furniture, 

Whole amount expended for Wages and Labor, . 

Whole amount expended for Farm Stock and Impl'mts 

W T hole amount expended for Books and Stationery, 

Whole amount expended for Expense, 

Whole amount expended for Building, 

Sum Total of Expenditures, . . 
Amount of Cash on hand, 



$29,512 17 




205 18 






$29,717 35 




$5,799 47 




1,230 05 




3,246 36 




736 20 




2,339 16 




1,409 17 




2,829 56 




3,083 12 




362 12 




1,320 49 




7,191 81 





$29,547 51 
169 84 



Inventory. 
Amount on hand : — 

Provisions, 

Groceries, . . . .' 
Dry Goods and Clothing, 
Medicine, ..... 
Fuel and Oil, .... 

Furniture, 

Farm Stock and Implements, 
Books and Stationery, . . . 
Expense, ..... 



$871 


93 


456 


29 


2,834 


34 


556 


45 


2,134 


00 


1,409 


17 


2,872 


25 


320 


00 


632 


00 



29,717 35 



$11,886 43 
Expense account embraces Hay, Grain, Soap, Sand, 

Brooms, Travelling Expenses, and sundry other 

items of this class. 

Building, 7,191 81 

The Building Expense is for a new building designed 

for a Wood-house and for inmates of such characters 

as should be kept apart from the rest. It also em- 
braces a new Barn-shed, Yard, Drains, Privies, 

Sinks, Enclosing Fence, sundry other Fixtures, 

Wells, Grading, Blinds, Bells, Lightning Rods, &c. 

Whole amount of Inventory, $19,078 24 

Balance, . . . ... . . . $10,469 27 

Bills unpaid, . 320 00 

Whole cost of supporting the Institution from May 1 

to December 1, $10,789 27 

The average number of inmates to December 1, 1854, 
is 3 £4. 

The number of weeks from May 1 to December 1, 
1854, is 30 4-7. 

Whole cost per week, 352 92 

Cost of each inmate per week, 99 70-100 



1855.1 SENATE— No. 14. 41 



[C] 

BILL OF FARE. 
Dinner, 

Thurada' } Eeef Soup and Potatoes - 

FSd a day ' \ Fish ' Potatoes and Grav y- 

Satod? day ' } Pork, Beans ' and Potatoes ' 

Dinner and Supper. 

Sunday — Cold Pork and Beans and Tea. 

Breakfast. 

Bread and Coffee and Milk. 

Meat Hash or Pork and Beans for those who labor. 

Supper. 

Bread and Chocolate and Milk. 

NURSERY CHILDREN. 

Breakfast, Dinner, and Supper. 
Bread and Milk. 
Meat or Fish for older ones sometimes. 

INFANTS. 

Milk and Crackers. 

SICK. 
Bice, Molasses, Coffee, Tea, Gruel, Beef Tea, Mutton, Steak, Chicken, Cream Toast. 



S. D. BROOKS. 

November 24, 1854. 

6 



42 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 



[D.] 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Of the State Almshouse, Monson. 

FIRST DIVISION— REGULATING VISITORS. 

1. No person is allowed to visit the Almshouse without permission of one of the 
Inspectors or of the Superintendent, nor any visitor allowed to communicate with 
any inmate except by permission and in the presence of the attending officer. 

2. No visitors received on the Sabbath. 

SECOND DIVISION — REGULATING LIBERTIES OP INMATES. 

3. All inmates of the Almshouse are prohibited from going beyond the enclosure 
without special permission of the Superintendent ; and no inmate shall be allowed 
liberty to visit his or her friends without permission of one of the Inspectors and a 
ticket of the Superintendent specifying the time of absence so allowed. 

4. No inmate shall be allowed the liberty to pass into any room or entry other 
than that in which his or her apartments may be except by permission of the Su- 
perintendent. 

5. No inmate shall be allowed to use any tobacco, either chewing, smoking, or 
snuff, without special permission of the Superintendent, nor any one allowed to 
carry any light from one room to another or in or about the buildings at any time 
except it be a lantern ; nor is any inmate allowed to keep, carry, or otherwise have 
in his or possession any friction matches or pipes for smoking. 

RISING, MEALS, &C, DIVISION. 

6. The bell will be rung every morning at or before sunrise, when all inmates in 
health are required to rise and prepare for the duties of the day. The bell will be 
rung fifteen minutes before breakfast, forty-five minutes before dinner, and fifteen 
minutes before supper ; at which times all are required to put themselves in readi- 
ness for their meals, which will be announced by the ringing of the small bell at 
the dining-room door, when all (but the sick and otherwise disabled) shall immedi- 
ately repair to the tables and take such seats as are assigned them by the Superin- 
tendent, strictly observing decency and good order. No food shall be carried from 
the kitchen, or provided out of the usual times, except for the sick, infirm and 
infants. At nine o'clock every night the bell will be rung, when all inmates are 
required to go to their respective apartments, extinguish their lights, and retire to 
bed. 

CLEANLY AND SANITARY DIVISION. 

7. Cleanliness of all persons in the house is strictly required. It shall be the 
duty of all inmates to wash their faces and hands and comb their hair immediately 
after rising in the morning and previous to dinner and supper ; also to bathe and 
shave their beards, and change their dress as often as in the opinion of the Superin- 
tendent is necessary, and on such days in the week as the Superintendent shall 
assign for that purpose. 

8. No filth or dirt of any kind is allowed to be thrown out of any window or 
into any place not assigned for that purpose by the Superintendent. 



1855.] SENATE— No. 14. , 43 

9. Particular care must be taken that the house and adjoining lands be kept clean 
and neat. All occupied rooms, together with the entry and stairways, shall be 
swept daily, and scoured as often as is necessary to insure cleanliness ; and no filth 
or dirt or soiled clothing of any kind shall be allowed to remain in any room, space 
or entry at any time ; and every thing about the beds or rooms shall be kept neat, 
in order, and in its appropriate place, and all occupied rooms shall be thoroughly 
ventilated. 

10. Employment shall be provided for all inmates capable of labor, and they 
shall perform such and so much service daily as may be required of them by the 
Superintendent. Those who acquit themselves cheerfully and faithfully will 
receive proper encouragement ; while the slothful and refractory shall receive ex- 
emplary punishment. No inmate shall be considered sick or so infirm as to be 
exempt from going to the tables or performing labor unless so pronounced by the 
attending physician. 

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS. 

11. Religious services will be held in the Chapel every Sabbath, and will be 
announced by the ringing of the bell, when all inmates who in the opinion of the 
Superintendent can with propriety attend shall so attend. And every evening at 
sundown, or before, at the ringing of the bell, all who are able shall assemble in 
the Chapel to attend prayers. 

12. No obscene, profane, or unbecoming language by any one in or about the 
house or on the farm will be allowed. 

13. All inmates of the Almshouse are required to strictly obey the subordinate 
officers and attendants of the Institution in carrying out the foregoing rules and 
regulations ; and any inmate who shall violate any of the foregoing rules and regu- 
ulations, or disregard the orders of the subordinate officers and attendants in the 
discharge of their duties, shall receive by the Superintendent, or at his orders, 
exemplary punishment. 

S. D. BROOKS, Superintendent. 

Approved by JOSIAH HOOKER, ) 

A. V. BLANCHARD, V Inspectors. 
ALYIN SMITH, ) 

State Almshouse at Monson, July 1, 1854. 



44 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan, 



IB- 



BY-LAWS FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE STATE 

ALMSHOUSES. 

INSPECTORS. 

Section 1. The Board of Inspectors shall be organized, annually, by the choice 
of a Chairman ; and the Clerk of the House, if there be one, shall be their Clerk, 
and attend all stated meetings of the Board, and keep a record of the same. If 
there be no Clerk of the House, the Board shall choose one of its own number, who 
shall perform the before-named duties. 

Sect. 2. The Inspectors shall meet on the last Friday of each month, to approve 
bills, consult upon the general interests of the Institution, and transact all business 
that may properly come before them. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the duty required of them by the 10th section of chap- 
ter 275 of the acts of 1852, the Inspectors shall, annually, in the month of Decem- 
ber, make to the Governor and Council a full Report of the number of paupers 
supported during the year preceding, specifying the number of males and of 
females, the city or town from which they were severally received, the birthplace 
of each and of foreigners, and the length of time each one has been in the Common- 
wealth. They shall also present an abstract of the Physician's Report of the births> 
deaths and sickness that have occurred during the year. 

Sect. 4. The Inspectors shall meet with the Inspectors of the other State Alms- 
houses, semiannually, on the first Tuesdays of June and December, and at such 
other times as the united Boards may agree upon, to consult upon the best means 
of promoting the interests of the Institutions under their supervision — said meet- 
ings to be held in the State House in Boston, unless a different place shall be fixed 
upon. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

Section 1. The Superintendent shall have the charge and supervision of the 
Institution in all its departments, subject to the order of the Board of Inspectors. 

Sect. 2. He shall make all purchases of stock, farming utensils, provisions, 
clothing, and every thing that shall be needed in carrying on the establishment, under 
the direction, and with the concurrence, of the Inspectors. 

Sect. 3. He shall examine all paupers on their admission into the house, and 
make full inquiries as to their legal settlements ; note, and cause to be recorded, 
such facts in regard to them as are important to be preserved ; shall cause them to 
be thoroughly cleansed and suitably located, having reference to their age and 
general character, placing those who may require medical treatment in charge of 
the Physician, and shall be especially careful that the infirm inmates and children 
are treated with considerate care and kindness. 

Sect. 4. He shall make all needful regulations relating to the hours of rising 
and retiring, of meals and of labor ; to preserve cleanliness and decorum of man- 
ners, subject to the approval of the Inspectors, and shall enforce obedience on the 
part of the inmates to the rules prescribed for them, and shall have power, at his 



1855.] SENATE— No. 14. 45 

discretion, to punish all wilful infractions of the same ; and it shall be his duty to 
report to the Inspectors, monthly, all cases of discipline, and the kind and mode of 
punishment inflicted. 

Sect. 5* It shall be his duty to see that the police and other regulations, for the 
management of the Institution and government and employment of the inmates are 
duly enforced, and that the subordinate officers and others employed about the 
house, in the workshops and elsewhere, upon the farm, discharge faithfully their 
respective duties. 

Sect. 6. He shall see that the provisions furnished to the inmates are of good 
quality and in sufficient quantity, and that no waste be permitted. He shall not 
permit the use of intoxicating drinks by any inmate. He shall see that the house 
is kept clean and properly warmed and ventilated, and that such of the inmates as 
are able to perform labor are kept employed, and that all the concerns of the estab- 
lishment are well ordered and conducted. 

Sect. 7. The Superintendent shall, at least once a month, make to the Inspectors 
a full Report of the number of persons admitted to the house or discharged from it, 
specifying the sex, name, date of admission and discharge of each, from what city 
or town received, and such other facts relating to their personal history as may 
have come to his knowledge. He shall also present to the Board a statement of 
the general behavior of the inmates, and of all other matters important to be known. 
He shall furthermore, in this Report, specify all purchases and sales that have been 
made during the month. For the foregoing purposes suitable blanks shall be fur- 
nished him. 

Sect. 8. The Superintendent shall, at the monthly meeting of the Inspectors, 
present the bills of all purchases made during the month for their approval. A 
schedule of the same, certified by at least two Inspectors, shall be sent to the State 
Auditor ; and after the same shall have been passed upon by the Governor and 
Council, and a warrant drawn for the payment thereof, the Superintendent shall 
pay the same, retaining the receipts as his vouchers. 

Sect. 9. In case any inmate leaves the house without being regularly dis- 
charged, it shall be the duty of the Superintendent immediately to give notice of 
the fact to the Superintendents of the other State Almshouses, giving as accurate a 
description of the person as is practicable ; and if a pauper is brought to the house 
a second time who had previously escaped therefrom, or who is known to have 
escaped from either of the other State Almshouses, it shall be the duty of the Su- 
perintendent to proceed against him agreeably to the provision of the ninth section 
of the law establishing the State Almshouses. 

Sect. 10. The Superintendent shall give bonds to the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of the Commonwealth, in the sum of four thousand dollars, for the faithful 
keeping and disbursement of all moneys that may be intrusted to him. 

SUBORDINATE OFFICERS. 

There shall be connected with the Institution a Matron, Assistant Superintendent, 
Chaplain, Physicians, one attending and one consulting, and such number of 
Teachers as may be needed, the same to be appointed by the Inspectors, and such 
Assistants, in the several departments, as may, in the judgment of the Inspectors, 
be necessary for maintaining proper order and discipline, and for the various opera- 
tions on the farm and in the workshops — said Assistants to be nominated by the 
Superintendent, subject to the approval or rejection of the Board, and to be removed 
by them whenever in their judgment the interests of the Institution require it. 
The compensation allowed the aforenamed officers shall be fixed by the Inspectors* 



46 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

MATRON. 

Section 1. The Matron shall have (subject to the Superintendent) the charge 
and oversight of the in-door operations ; shall see that all the inmates are provided 
for, according to their respective wants, by herself or assistants ; that cleanliness, 
both in their persons and apartments, and that good order and decorum, be observed 
at all times ; and shall report delinquents to the Superintendent for discipline. She 
shall have oversight and direction of the operations of the kitchen, in the prepara- 
tion of food for the inmates, and see that no waste be permitted, and that the meals 
are served at the appointed time. 

Sect. 2. She shall be careful of all the goods, property and furniture committed 
to her charge, that they be not lost or embezzled. 

Sect. 3. She shall direct the detailing the women under her charge to such 
branches of labor as in her judgment they are best fitted to perform. 

Sect. 4, She shall have the general oversight of her assistants, and see that each 
discharges faithfully the duties assigned her. 

Sect. 5. She shall, at proper and stated times, have all the clothing of the in- 
mates and the bedclothes changed and replaced with clean apparel, and shall be 
vigilant over every part of the Institution in regard to cleanliness, and shall see 
that the female inmates observe all the rules prescribed for ablution and bathing. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT. 

Section 1. The Assistant Superintendent shall aid the Superintendent in his 
various duties, when required, and, in his absence, shall act as Superintendent, as 
well as in case of his sickness or disability. 

Sect. 2. He shall require and enforce among the male inmates a strict obser- 
vance of all rules prescribed for insuring cleanliness, by daily ablution and occasional 
bathing of the whole person. He shall see that no dirt or other offensive matter 
be suffered to accumulate in or about the rooms or workshops occupied by them. 

Sect. 3. He shall perform such other duties as may be required by the Super- 
intendent, with the concurrence of the Inspectors. 

CHAPLAIN. 

The Inspectors shall appoint a Chaplain of respectable attainments and unblem- 
ished life, who shall perform one religious service, at least, on each Lord's day, 
and who shall attend all funerals of deceased inmates when called upon by the 
Superintendent, and visit the sick and dying who may desire his ministrations. 

PHYSICIANS. 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the regular visiting Physician to attend al 
cases of sickness that may occur in the house, and he shall keep an accurate record 
of all such cases in a book prepared for the purpose, specifying the name and age 
of the patient, the date of admission into the hospital and discharge from it, the 
disease and the result. He shall also keep an accurate register of all the births 
that occur in the house. These records shall be exhibited to the Inspectors at the 
close of each year, or at any time when they may be called for. It shall, further- 
more, be the duty of the Physician, from time to time, to make such suggestions, 
relating to the sanitary condition of the Institution, as he may deem important. 

Sect. 2. He shall have the oversight of the nurses in the several departments 
of the hospital, and see that their duties are faithfully discharged, and with proper 
regard to the feelings of those who may be under their charge. 



1855.] SENATE— No. 14. 47 

CONSULTING PHYSICIAN. 

The Consulting Physician shall attend at the house whenever his services may- 
be needed by the Attending Physician, and shall always be consulted before any 
important surgical operation is performed. 

TEACHERS. 

Section 1. The Inspectors shall provide instruction for the children in the 
house of suitable age to attend school in the elementary branches of education. 

Sect. 2. The Teachers shall use their best efforts to advance them in the knowl- 
edge best fitted to enable them to make their own way in life, and likewise to 
impress upon them, by all proper means, the duties of temperance, frugality, hon- 
esty, and the ruinous consequences of the opposite vices. 

The foregoing By-Laws may be altered or amended at any regular meeting of 
the united Board of Inspectors, provided a majority of each Board agrees thereto, 
and with the concurrence of the Governor of the Commonwealth. 

JACOB COGGIN, ) Inspectors 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, } State Almshouse, 
STEPHEN MANSUR, ) Tewksbury. 

JO SI AH HOOKER, ~) Inspectors 

ALVIN SMITH, V State Almshouse, 

ALONZO Y. BLANCHARD, 5 Monson. 

ABRAHAM T. LOWE, ) Inspectors 
NAHUM STETSON, } State Almshouse, 

BRADFORD L. WALES, 5 Bridgewater. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, ) 

Council Chamber, March 3, 1854. ) 

The above By-Laws are read and approved. 

EMORY WASHBURN, Governor. 



48 ALMSHOUSE AT MOXSON [Jan. '55. 



IF-] 

THIS INDENTURE, made the day of in the year eighteen hundred 

and between the Inspectors of the State Almshouse established at in the 
county of and State of Massachusetts, under the authority of the Act of the 
Legislature of said State passed in the year 1852, chap. 275, of the one part, and 
of in the county of of the other part, witnesseth : That the 

said Inspectors do, by these presents, bind an inmate of said Almshouse, of 

"'..'- ::r of years, to him the said as an apprentice in the business of 

to live with him, the said and remain in his service, as such 

apprentice, from the day of the date of these Presents until the day of 

which will be in the year eighteen hundred and when the said will 

have arrived at the age of rs, according to the law of the Commonwealth in 

this behalf made and provided. 

And the said in consideration of the premises, doth hereby covenant 

with and promise said Inspectors, that he will thoroughly instruct said or 

3 to be so instructed in the art, trade or business of that he will 

give suitable opportunities at school, so that may thoroughly learn the 

several branches of spelling, reading, writing, arithmetic, geography, grammar, and 

other things -.is "tally taught in our common schools ; that he will give or cause to 

be given to psopee mohax axd EXLiGiors rs-sxnrcnox, and allow and require 

to attend public religious worship on the Sabbath, providing with suitable 

apparel therefor ; that he will treat kindly, exercising over a parental care 

and control ; that he will watch over morals, endeavoring by all means to guard 

against vicious habits and practices, and to train up in such a way that 

will become a virtuous, intelligent and useful citizen. 

And the said also covenants that he will furnish the said with 

suitable board and clothing, and provide for in all other respects in a suitable 
manner, both in si skn - : - and in health, during said period ; so that in no event shall 
the State or any town therein be at any expense whatever on account of said 
during said period. And the said further covenants that he will once at 

least in each year during said period, viz., in the month of of the same, and also 
at any other time, when required by the Inspectors of said Almshouse, make and 
return to the said Inspectors a written and particular report concerning the charac- 
ter, behavior and condition of said 

And if the said shall remain as aforesaid with the said until is 

years of age, and serve him faithfully, said covenants that he will then 

-/:.-; \. --. -:.:". the sum of dollars, and provide with suitable appareL 

viz., with two full suits of good clothes, one for the Sabbath, and the other for 

working days, and also an overcoat, and will also give a Bible. 

In v\ ...:/::: ti e \ above named have to this and to one other instru- 

ment, of the same tenor and date, interchangeably set their hands and seal- 
day .: in the year eighteen hundred and 

l :ted and delivered > 
in presence of $ 



3 
SENATE No. 7. 



SECOND ANNUAL EEPORT 



INSPECTORS 



STATE ALMSHOUSE, 



AT MONSON. 



DECEMBER, 1855. 



BOSTON: 

WILT J AM WHITE, PRINTER TO THE STATE. 
18 5 6. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor ', and the Honorable Council 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts : — 

In compliance with a statute of the Commonwealth, the 
Inspectors of the State Almshouse at Monson respectfully pre- 
sent the Second Annual Report of the Institution. 

The Act of the legislature, passed May 19, 1855, entitled 
"An Act providing for the classification of State paupers,"' 
essentially changes the object and character of this institution. 
By this Act, it is expressly " set apart for the purpose of a 
State Pauper School," in which all the State pauper children 
between five and sixteen years of age, so long as they are de- 
pendent upon public charity, or are not indentured, are to be 
supported and educated, to the exclusion of all others, except 
in a few cases which are designated in the Act. 

The Act went into practical operation in the month of June, 
(between the 13th and 16th of the month,) when an inter- 
change of paupers took place between the Monson State Alms- 
house and the other State Almshouses, agreeably to the 
provisions of the Act. 

Our Eeport, therefore, comprises two periods of time, which 
are, in some measure, distinct in reference to character and 
details. The first, extending from December 1, 1854, to June 
15, 1855, during which paupers of all descriptions were 
inmates of the house ; the other, extending from June 15 to 
December 1, 1855, during which period, under the new law of 
classification, the inmates consisted almost entirely of children 
and youth between the ages specified above. 

In relation to both periods, a summary statement of promi- 
nent facts, derived from the records of the institution, is con- 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Feb. 

tained in the report of the Superintendent, which is annexed 
hereunto. 

From this statement it appears, among other things, that the 
number of inmates in the institution, from December 1, 1854, 

to June 15, 1855, was 1,082 

Number from June 15 to December 1, 1855, . . 540 



Whole number during the year, . . . 1,622 
Number of inmates in the house at the present time, 
December 1, 1855, 688 

In relation to the diseases that have more or less prevailed 
in the house during the year, the deaths that have occurred, and 
other statistics relating to the medical department, we beg leave 
to refer to that part of the Superintendent's Report which 
relates to this department. 

This document shows a marked improvement in respect to 
the general health of the inmates, and freedom from disease, 
especially in the latter part of the year, after the change took 
place under the new law of classification. 

The report of the Superintendent, before referred to, con- 
tains many interesting facts and valuable 'suggestions relating 
to the internal management of the institution, and other mat- 
ters connected therewith ; and it seems to us to present so full 
and clear an exhibition of the state of the institution as to 
preclude the necessity of incorporating into our report the 
details therein given. 

In regard to the financial concerns of the institution, we 
refer to the accounts inserted in the Superintendent's report, 
as presenting full and satisfactory statements — drawn from the 
account books of the institution — of the receipts and expendi- 
tures during the year, both for the current expenses of the 
house, and for buildings and other permanent improvements. 

From these it appears that the whole cost of supporting the 

inmates during the year is $35,659 00 

Cost of supporting each pauper during the year is 56 33 

Cost of same per week, ..... 1 08 

The change made in the institution by the new law of classi- 
fication is much greater than would be supposed, on a super- 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 5 

ficial view of the matter. Prior to the time of the change, the 
inmates included Stat e paupers of every description, all 
necessarily mingled together indiscriminately, to an extent 
that could not be otherwise than deleterious. Now, for the 
most part, only the young and the comparatively healthy and 
robust are brought, together in this institution. It is now 
emphatically, as denominated in the statute, a State Pauper 
School, whose primary object is to take care of and educate 
those children of the State who have none beside the State to 
care for them. 

The principle which is the basis of the new law is of un- 
questionable soundness and importance. To separate the 
young from the contaminations of vice and corruption, and 
from exposure to virulent disease, and place them in a position 
where all the surrounding circumstances and influences will 
have a tendency to invigorate their physical constitutions, and 
improve and elevate their moral natures, with the view of mak- 
ing them hardy, intelligent and virtuous American citizens, is 
certainly an aim important enough for the interposition of the 
State, and worthy of earnest and persevering effort. Indeed, 
it seems to us, that the engrafting of this feature into the sys- 
tem of supporting the poor will do more than any thing else 
towards insuring success to its results, and commending it to 
public favor. 

It has been thought by some that it would have been better 
to have established and set apart an entirely new institution for 
the purposes contemplated in the new law. But whether the 
legislature selected the best mode of carrying out the principle 
of classification is not for us to decide. It is sufficient that it 
has been made in the way that it has been ; and when so made, 
it became the duty of those having charge of the institution 
affected by it, to adopt every suitable and proper measure for 
securing an adaptation of its management and discipline to the 
new arrangements prescribed by the law. 

In the furtherance of this object, sundry changes were neces- 
sary in the accommodations for the inmates, and in the internal 
economy and management of the establishment. And the 
expenses of the institution, from various causes connected with 
the process of change, have, the present year, been consider- 
ably increased. It became necessary to employ a much larger 



6 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

number of teachers than before, and also incur much additional 
expense in supplying school-books and other educational means 
for the use of the children in the schools. Then again, the 
expense of food and clothing is greater under the present than 
under the former arrangement. A collection of healthy and 
growing children will consume more food than a class of pau- 
pers consisting of persons in infancy or extreme old age, or 
who are subject to disease and infirmity ; and will, also, by 
their active and restless habits, wear out a greater amount of 
clothing in the same period of time. 

It is also to be considered that the withdrawal of the adult 
inmates from this to the other almshouses has occasioned a 
deficiency of pauper help in the various departments of labor, 
requiring the substitution of hired help therefor. 

A special appropriation of $12,400 was made by the last 
legislature, for this institution, embracing several objects con- 
nected therewith, but principally with reference to the purpose 
of placing the cook-room, laundry and other departments of 
like processes, in a new building to be erected separate from 
the main buildings of the establishment, not only for the sake 
of greater convenience and economy, but also of more perfect 
security against fire. At the time the appropriation was ap- 
plied for an estimate was made, as far as it could be done, of 
the wants of the institution in this respect ; and it was supposed 
the above sum would be sufficient for the purposes contempla- 
ted. The change since made in the institution was not then, 
to our knowledge, anticipated or even surmised. Indeed, it 
was not till within a short time of the close of the session that 
the law making the change was initiated and passed to be 
enacted. As we have before remarked, one result of the 
change is found to be a great diminuition of help in the vari- 
ous branches of labor, and the deficiency has been supplied 
thus far by hired help. 

But in carrying into effect the purposes of the special appro- 
priation, in erecting a new building and furnishing it with 
proper apparatus for the processes of the cooking-room, laun- 
dry, &c, the question presented itself for the consideration of 
the Superintendent and Inspectors, whether the deficiency of 
help now experienced could not, in a great measure, be advan- 
tageously and economically supplied by the introduction of 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 7 

steam and of steam-power. And it was important, if not abso- 
lutely necessary, to come to a decision upon this point at the 
earliest stages of the undertaking, in order to construct the 
new building and arrange its apartments with reference to this 
object. The expense of the enterprise would be considerably 
enhanced by this addition ; but it was hoped and reasonably 
expected, from the estimates that were obtained, that it would 
not swell the amount of expenditure much, if any, beyond the 
appropriation. Under these circumstances it was decided, 
after due inquiry and deliberation, to introduce the application 
of steam and of steam-power in the way proposed. 

The appropriation has been expended by the Superintendent, 
under the direction of the Inspectors ; and in pursuance of the 
object of the appropriation, a new two-story brick building, 
seventy feet in length by forty-five in width, has been erected 
on the east side of the east building, twenty-four feet distant 
therefrom, with a covered passage way extending from the one 
to the other, and connecting the kitchen and bakery with the 
dining-halls. The building contains in the first story a kitchen 
and bakery, with a store-room for each, also an engine-room 
and a grinding-room ; in the second story, a washing-room, 
ironing-room, clothes-room, and drying-room, by artificial heat. 
In the attic a small room is partitioned, off' which contains two 
large tanks or reservoirs of water, and is also used in part for 
a store-room. The rest of the attic is one spacious room, and 
is intended to be used for the present chiefly for drying clothes, 
but will be used for other purposes as it may be wanted. 

In their appropriate places in the building are the engine, of 
ten horse-power, a large tubular boiler, a corn mill, circular 
saw, washing wheel, coffee mill, grindstone, and the various 
steam machinery and apparatus for cooking, washing, drying 
clothes, baking, &c. 

The engine, by its several connections, carries on, with admi- 
rable facility and exactness, the different operations in the build- 
ing, of grinding, sawing, washing, &c. ; and the power is such 
as to admit of being extended considerably beyond its present 
connections, if it should be deemed expedient. 

It is also intended to do the baking by steam-heat, and a 
baking apparatus has been prepared, which is warranted by the 



8 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

makers, Blanchard & Kimball, to answer the purpose designed ; 
and, so far as it has been tested, it has proved successful. 

The heat used in the building for generating the steam, &c, 
all comes from one fire, and that fire consumes but about 
five hundred pounds of coal each day. And the arrangements 
are so perfect that the " exhaust " steam from the engine is all 
expended in heating all the hot water that is used in the 
laundry and in the pauper part of the buildings, and that with- 
out any waste whatever. 

A steam-boiler, of like capacity and power, would be neces- 
sary, if the steam were used only in the cooking process ; and 
the connecting of the engine therewith increases the daily ex- 
pense of fuel but very little, if any, as the consumption is 
about the same. 

The engine, boiler, and steam apparatus, which are of beau- 
tiful and finished mechanism, are from the locomotive works 
of Blanchard & Kimball, Springfield. 

The building, with all its arrangements as to rooms and 
machinery, was planned by Dr. Brooks, the Superintendent ; 
and every part seems exactly adapted to its purpose. The 
carpenter work was executed by Charles • W. Richards, of 
Palmer, and the mason work by the Messrs. Shaw of Palmer, 
and the whole has been skilfully and satisfactorily done. 

Although the outlay of expense in the new building is 
largely increased by the addition of the steam-engine, &c.,yet, 
it is believed the extra expenditure will be more than compen- 
sated by the saving of labor and of other items of expense now 
superseded by the use of steam. For instance, in the single 
matter of grinding, there will be a large saving of expense, not 
only in the toll, but also in travel to and from the mill, here- 
tofore resorted to, which is about two miles from the almshouse. 
The new mill is capable of grinding over ten bushels of corn 
an hour. So also in regard to washing clothes, the washing 
wheel will do the work of at least ten women, in the same 
period of time. Nor should the convenience and facility of 
the operations by steam be overlooked in estimating the compara- 
tive value of the new arrangement. 

In addition to the above, we may mention other improve- 
ments of a permanent kind, which properly come within the 
scope of the special appropriation. A capacious brick ice-house, 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 9 

twenty-four feet long by twenty-two feet wide, with a milk-room 
in the upper part of it, has been built ; also, a large shed in 
connection with the barn. The barn has also been clapboarded 
and painted, and the building originally designed as a work- 
shop for the inmates, which stood quite too near the main build- 
ings for convenience and danger from fire, has been moved, at 
considerable expense, to a greater distance, and is now used 
in part for a carpenter's shop, also for store-room and other 
necessary and useful purposes. Ventilators, made of galvanized 
iron, have also been provided for all the main buildings, at an 
expense of about $1,200 ; and these were absolutely necessary 
for the comfort and health of the inmates. 

Other improvements of a similar kind, but less expensive, 
have been made during the year, as they have been deemed 
important and necesssary. But all the expenditures for these 
purposes, have, it is believed, been judiciously and economically 
made ; and no expense has been incurred which can be termed 
needless or extravagant. Yet, in executing fully and to advan- 
tage the designs of the legislature in making the appropriation, 
and adopting the new system of classification, it has been found 
impossible to keep within the limits of the appropriation, and 
we are obliged to report a deficiency of about $3,000. 

As the work is not entirely completed, and all the bills have 
not yet been presented, we cannot say precisely what the 
deficiency will be. The above is the estimated amount. 

In regard to appropriations for the coming year, we do not 
propose to ask of the legislature any special appropriation for 
additional buildings or other like permanent improvements. 
Some might be suggested as desirable on some accounts ; yet 
they may, without much inconvenience, be deferred to a future 
time, and, under present circumstances, we think this expedi- 
ent. An appropriation for the deficiency of last year will be 
necessary. 

THE FARM. 

The farm has been more productive the last than it was 
the previous year. A variety of valuable crops has been 
raised from it. For the details of crops and other statistics 
relating to the farm, we refer to the report o£ the Superin-, 
tendent. 



10 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

Much labor has been bestowed upon the farm, without refer- 
ence to immediate production, in making substantial improve- 
ments, by grading where necessary, building stone walls, &c. ; 
or, in preparing for future cultivation, by removing rocks and 
stones, draining, breaking up new lands, &c. A large amount 
of labor will yet be necessary before the lands will be brought 
into a proper shape and under good cultivation. 

The work has been principally done by hired laborers. The 
older boys have occasionally been employed in light work, such 
as weeding carrots and other vegetables, removing stones, &c. 
They have been taken out almost every day in the summer on 
work of this kind ; and it has been found conducive to their 
health, without interfering with their studies at school. 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. 

This department is under the immediate charge of Mr. H. 
W. Stickney, as Principal, — the Superintendent, Dr. Brooks, 
taking the general supervision of the whole, as of other depart- 
ments. Associated with Mr. Stickney, are six female teachers, 
some of whom are from the State Normal School at Westfield, 
and all of them exceedingly well qualified for their sphere ox 
duty. 

Mr. Stickney manages this department with peculiar skill 
and energy ; and with the faithful cooperation of his associate 
teachers, meets with encouraging success. The Chaplain, Rev. 
Mr. Wright, also renders essential service by his visits in the 
schools. 

The whole number usually attending all the schools is 436, 
viz : 336 boys and 100 girls. Average attendance, 421. 

They are uniformly regular and punctual in their attend- 
ance, unless detained by sickness or other necessary cause ; 
and this is one of the causes for the good success of the 
schools. 

The children are of different ages, from five to sixteen, but 
are more nearly on a level as to attainments, when they come 
to the almshouse, than children in our district schools, having 
generally enjoyed but very slight (if any) advantages of edu- 
cation before coming. There is, therefore, no occasion for the 
regular gradation of schools which is usually adopted. 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 11 

The older and more advanced pupils are under the immedi- 
ate care and instruction of Mr. Stickney and one of the assistant 
female teachers. The number usually attending this school is 
150, viz. : 120 boys and 30 girls. In this school are taught rea- 
ding^ spelling, writing, geography, and other branches usually 
taught in our common schools. 

The other schools — five in number — are primary schools, 
differing but little in grade, each being under the charge of one 
female teacher. 

All the schools are easily governed, not being liable to inter- 
ference from parents or others, and good order is uniformly 
preserved in them. The children generally behave with so 
much decorum and propriety that it is seldom necessary to 
resort to punishments of any kind. 

The pupils have also generally made very good proficiency 
in their studies, showing diligence on their part, and fidelity on 
the part of the teachers. Some of the children have made 
extraordinary progress. The schools will not suffer in any 
respect by a comparison with our common district schools, and 
in some respects, they are superior. 

Much care is also taken in reference to the formation of the 
moral habits and character of the children ; and in all the efforts 
on this behalf, it is a prominent aim to train them up in such a way 
that they will become intelligent and worthy members of the 
community. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION AND SERVICES. 

This department of duty is under the charge of the Chap- 
lain, the Eev. Mr. Wright, and for information concerning it, 
we refer to his report to the Inspectors, which is hereto an- 
nexed. And in this connection we cannot refrain from speak- 
ing of the valuable services of Mr. Wright in the office assigned 
to him. He is respected and beloved by all ; and the influence 
of his instructions and example is exceedingly salutary upon the 
inmates and upon all connected with the institution. 

DISCHARGING INMATES. 

Applications are often made to the Inspectors to discharge 
from the house some of the children, by the parents or others, 
on the assurance that they will take care of them in future. 



12 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

And we sometimes find it difficult to decide how to dispose of 
such applications. While due regard should be paid to the 
feelings and interests of parents and other relatives in cases of 
this kind, we deem it our duty, before yielding to the request, 
to be satisfied that the children will be well taken care of in all 
respects, and the Commonwealth saved harmless in future from 
any expense on their account. We have therefore adopted as 
a general rule on this subject, that it must be shown to the 
satisfaction of the Inspectors by the certificate of the select- 
men or overseers of the poor of the place where the applicants 
reside, in connection with other evidence, 1. That the parents 
or others wishing to take the child, are so far responsible that 
there will be no danger of any further expense to the Com- 
monwealth on account of such child. 2. That they are of 
suitable character and qualifications to be intrusted with the 
care and training of the child ; and a circular to this effect has 
been issued under the signatures of the Inspectors. 

BINDING OUT CHILDEEN. 

The Inspectors have taken suitable measures to obtain places 
in families of respectablility for such children as are of suit- 
able age to be indentured. And with this view, they have 
issued a circular under their signatures, stating the terms and 
conditions on which the children are indentured. In order to 
protect the interests both of the Commonwealth and of the 
child, it is required that the applicant shall bring with him the 
certificate of the selectmen or overseers of the poor of the 
place where he resides, together with other pertinent evidence, 
to satisfy the Inspectors that he is a responsible person, and 
capable of indemnifying the State against any expense on ac- 
count of the child during his minority ; and that he is in other 
respects a person of suitable character and qualifications to 
take the child under his charge. 

The number of boys indentured during the year is twenty- 
four ; and most of them are placed with farmers to learn the 
business of agriculture. The number of girls indentured 
during the year is fourteen. The number of both sexes now 
out on trial is nine. 

One of the chief reasons why so few are indentured, com- 
pared with the whole number in the house, is because appli- 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 13 

cants for children generally seek such as have no parents to 
annoy them or interfere with their management. A large 
proportion also are not of a suitable age to be indentured. 

GOVERNMENT OF THE INSTITUTION. 

This has been maintained principally through the efficiency 
of moral influences. No difficulties have occurred to disturb 
the general harmony, which were not easily overcome. Mild- 
ness, combined with firmness an decision, has almost uniformly 
prevailed to subdue the refractory. The inmates have gen- 
erally yielded a willing and cheerful obedience to the rules of 
the institution ; and only in extreme cases (and those few in 
number) has resort been had to punishments by confinement 
or^otherwise, to enforce compliance with the rules. 

In addition to the former rules and regulations (annexed to 
the report of last year) a new code of rules has been framed 
by the Superintendent and approved by the Inspectors, adapted 
to the changed state of the institution ; and the same is ap- 
pended to this Report. 

The office of Matron has been filled by Mrs. Brooks, wife of 
the Superintendent ; and the responsible trust is discharged by 
her with singular fidelity and efficiency. The good order, 
neatness, and economy which prevail in the domestic arrange- 
ments of the house, are attributable, in no small degree, to her 
care and oversight. 

SUGGESTIONS EESPECTING THE PAUPER LAWS. 

The experiment now going on under the new law of classifica- 
tion, should, in our opinion, be fairly tested before returning 
back to the former system, or making any other essential 
change in the present arrangement. 

The only modification of the law that we would suggest, as 
perhaps expedient, is, that all State paupers in the four western 
counties and a portion of Worcester County, be sent, hereafter, 
as before the new law, to the Monson State Almshouse. The 
number of adults over sixteen years of age, and of children 
under five, coming from this district, is so small and of such a 
character, that, an the judgment of the Superintendent, they 
could be accommodated in our almshouse without much inter- 



14 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

ference with the new system of classification ; and the arrange- 
ment would be a great convenience to this part of the State, 
besides being less expensive to the Commonwealth. Some 
other slight amendments of the law may be necessary in order 
to make it more explicit in its meaning. 

We are also led by onr own observation of the working of 
the law, which makes provision for paying towns for the trans- 
portation of paupers, to suggest whether the same ought not to 
be repealed, or so far modified as to limit the allowance to so much 
per mile for each pauper. The law, as it now stands, is liable 
to great abuse. The inequality of burden upon the towns, 
without the provision, cannot be very great ; not more so than 
in other analogous cases. 

For similar reasons we make the same suggestion in regard 
to the law of last winter, — making provision for paying towns 
for the support of paupers who cannot be removed to the State 
almshouse, — believing it would be better to leave cases of 
extreme hardship upon towns (as in the case of Huntington) to 
special legislation for relief. 

We will only add, on this subject, that the whole code of pau- 
per laws needs to be thoroughly revised and put into a more 
practical and accessible form. 

In conclusion, we desire to bear our testimony to the ability 
and faithfulness which has marked the supervision and manage- 
ment of the institution by the Superintendent during the year, 
and to the prompt and efficient cooperation of the officers and 
assistants generally, in aid of his efforts. 

JOSIAH HOOKEK, 
G. OLCOTT BLISS, 
CHARLES RICHARDS, 

Inspectors. 
State Almshouse, Monson, ) 
December 1, 1855. j 



1856.] SENATE— No. T. 15 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : — 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with a vote of the United Board 
of Inspectors of the several State Almshouses, passed at their 
late semi-annual meeting, I hereby present to you a Report of 
this Institution and its affairs, for the year ending December 
1, 1855. 



The No. of persons in the house, 


Dec. 1, 1854, was, 




Men, 


.... 


94 


Women, . 


• . 


93 


Boys, 


. 


221 


Girls, 


. 


92 


There have been admitted during 


the year, 




Men, 


• • 


285 


Women, . 


. 


162 


Boys, 


• 


406 


Girls, 


< . 


269 


The whole number who have been 


in the house dur- 




ing the year, . 


. 


1622 


The number discharged, indentured, absconded and 




died, * is 


. 


934 


The number. now in the house, Dec. 1, 1855, is, 




Men, 


. 38 




Women, . 


. 63 




Boys, 


. 380 




Girls, 


. 207 





Total, 


. 


688 



* See Physician's and Inspectors' Keports. 



16 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



There are inmates now in the house, 

Under 5 years of age, . 59 

Between 5 and 10 years, . 396 

" 10 and 15 years, . 132 

Children, . . . 587 

» 

Between 15 and 40 years, . 73 

" 40 and 60 years, . 21 

" 60 and 90 years, . 7 

Adults, ... 101 

Of the No. now in the house, there were born in 

Ireland, . . . .167 

England, .... 18 

Other foreign countries, . 50 

Differ'nt States in the Union, 53 

Massachusetts, . . . 400 

Total, ... 688 



The largest number of children in the house at any 

one time, ....... 601 

The largest number of children and adults in the 

house at any one time, . . . . . 750 

The smallest number at any one time, . . . 499 

The average No. supported through the year, . 633 

The Act contained in the four hundred and twelfth chapter of 
the Laws and Resolves of the last legislature, providing 
for the Classification of State Paupers, was carried into 
effect between the thirteenth and sixteenth of June, at 
which time there were in the house, 



Men, . 
Women, . 
Boys, 
Girls, 

Total, 



There were received from Tewksbury, 
There were received from Bridgewater, 
Total, 



95 
106 

218 
95 



160 
124 



514 



284 



1856.] 



SENATE— No. 7, 



IT 



There were sent to Tewksbury, 
There were sent to Bridgewater, 
Discharged, .... 
Total, .... 



101 
67 
15 



183 



By the change our number was increased, 



101 



The number of men was reduced from 95 to 31 
The number of women was reduced from 106 to 53 
The number of boys was increased from 218 to 350 
The number of girls was increased from 95 to 181 
We had then in the house, . . . 



615 



Since the above date we have rec'd f 'm Tewksbury, 
From Bridgewater, 



60 
66 



The number of orphans in the Institution, as near 

as we can ascertain, is .... . 98 

The number of those who have either father or 

mother living, is ...... 235 

Those who have both parents, .... 254 



Total, 



58T 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 

$169,84 



Cash on hand, Dec. 1, 1854, . 

Received from the Commonwealth 
during the year ending Decem- 
ber 1, 1855, . 

Received from all other sources, . 



49,725 44 
620 45 



The Expenditures of the year have been as fol- 
lows : — 



$50,515 73 



For Salaries, Wages and Labor, . $6,696 26 

Improvements and Repairs, . 2,716 99 

Dry Goods and Clothing, . 5,223 23 

Furniture, Beds and Bedding, 3,274 10 

3 



18 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan . 



For Flour, 715 bbls., . 


$7,391 40 


Crackers, . 


249 39 


Beef and Pork, 42, 501, . 


3,116 76 


Hams, . 


38 69 


Fish, 8,150 lbs., . 


296 00 


Poultry and Eggs, . 


157 24 


Milk, 14,571 galls., 


2,059 45 


Molasses, 2,324 galls., 


677 42 


Sugar, 4,240 lbs., . 


325 03 


Coffee, Tea and Chocolate, 


577 86 


Potatoes, 653 bushels, 


416 78 


Beans, 325 bushels, 


605 81 


Butter, 1,169 lbs., . 


278 37 


Cheese, 661 lbs., 


81 25 


Apples, 114 bushels, 


80 14 


Fruit, .... 


119 65 


Spices and Small Groceries, 


167 32 


Rice, 2,456 lbs., . 


166 73 


Lard, 444 lbs., 


54 93 


Salt, .... 


55 47 


Hops and Malt, 


32 35 


Cider and Vinegar, 


48 60 


Oxen, 11 yoke, 


1,637 56 


Horses, 1 span, 


400 00 


Cows, 7, . 


227 00 


Bnggy, .... 


90 00 


Sleighs, 2, . 


84 00 


Harnesses, 3, . 


77 50 


Bull, .... 


30 00 


Carts, 2, . . . 


170 00 


Chest of Tools, 


31 12 


Farm Implements, . 


430 41 


Blacksmithing, 


258 97 


Ladders, . 


22 00 


Saddle and Bridle, 


16 75 


Grist-mill, . 


115 00 


Hay and Straw, 


964 21 


Corn, 2,168 bushels, 


2,226 03 


Oats, 170 bushels, . 


93 56 


Items of ex. charged to Farm, 


34 60 



1856.] SENATE— 


No. 7. 


For Coal, 346 tons, 


$2,809 52 


Charcoal, 819 bushels, . 


77 40 


Wood, 39 cords, 


113 09 


Coal-sifter, 


22 50 


Oil, .... 


252 44 


Medical Department, Medicine 


i 


and Instruments, 


488 62 


Pauper Transportation, . 


956 23 


Soap, .... 


628 95 


Freights, 


634 52 


Brooms, Mops and Brushes, 


268 12 


Baskets, 


25 76 


Starch, 


12 00 


Pew-rent for two years, . 


50 00 


Postage and Despatches, 


79 11 


Sand, .... 


■ 27 50 


Paid bills contracted for building 


» 


put up last year, 


679 90 


Paid on old bills contracted by 




Building Commissioners, . 


313 33 


For Miscellaneous Items, 


260 81 


Cash on hand, . 


1,000 00 



19 



$50,515 73 



Last year's Inventory, . . . $11,886 43 
Money received during the year, . 50,515 73 



$62,402 16 



Inventory of December 1, 1855 
Provisions and Groceries on hand 
Dry Goods and Clothing, 
Fuel and Oil, 

Expense, .... 
Farm Stock and Impl'nts, Hay, &c. 
Furniture, Beds and Bedding, 
Books and Stationery, . 
Improvements, 
Medical Department, 



$3,040 72 
2,456 03 
2,646 75 

103 24 
6,414 40 
4,214 96 

400 00 
3,453 99 

5BQ 45 



20 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



Expenses, not including the support of pau- 




pers : — 
Transportation of Paupers, . 
Amount paid for building put up 
last year, ..... 
Amount paid on old debts, . 


$956 23 

679 90 
313 33 




Labor of men and teams drawing 






brick, lumber and stone for the 






new building, .... 
Cash on hand, .... 


507 00 

1,000 00 




Balance, (actual expense of supporting the 
paupers through the year,) 


$26,743 00 
$35,659 16 


Average number of paupers, 

Cost of supporting each single pauper 


thro' the year 


633 

$56 33 



Cost of each pauper per week. 



1 08 



BUILDING ACCOUNT. 

Keceived from the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth under the special appropriation, . . $12,391 27 

Which I have expended under your direction, as 
follows : — 



For old Building Debts, 


$1,127 44 


Two Carriages, 


315 00 


Fairbanks' Hayscales, 


202 25 


Stone Work for building, 


520 86 


Moving old Shop, . 


225 47 


Lumber, 


1,192 49 


Carpenters, 


949 31 


Freights, 


668 90 


Brick, .... 


1,032 50 


Lime and Cement, . 


146 88 


Mason, .... 


375 00 


Drawing Sand, 


100 00 


Lath, .... 


42 00 


Glass, .... 


68 52 



56.] SENATE— No. 7. 


>r Slating, ...» 


$515 67 


Plumbing, . . . 


998 25 


Sash and Doors, . 


76 10 


Nails, 


48 58 


Iron, ..... 


52 61 


Drawing Brick, 


43 75 


Engine and Boiler, 


2,000 00 


Putting up Steam-Pipes, 


101 75 


Ventilators, . 


1,155 14 


Stone for Underpinning, Win- 




dow-Caps, &c, . 


387 92 


Door-Plates, . 


7 63 


Sundry Expenses, . 


37 25 



21 



$12,391 27 



You will see by the foregoing statement, that the cost of sup- 
porting this institution for the year ending December 1, 1855, 
amounts to $35,659.16. 

The cost of supporting each single pauper through the year 
amounts to $56.33. 

The cost of supporting each pauper per week is $1.08, 
which amount exceeds what was predicted at the beginning of 
the year. The introduction of children principally into this 
institution, which was not then anticipated, and the consequent 
necessity of fitting up and furnishing school-rooms, employing 
several additional teachers, purchasing school-books and station- 
ery, and other incidental expenses, have contributed materially 
to these results. The continuance of high prices of provisions 
of all kinds, and the fact that the children are generally of an 
age and condition to constitute emphatically a consuming popu- 
lation, while they are, at the same time, unable to render essen- 
tial service upon the farm, in the workshop, or in doing th# 
work of permanent improvements, so that we have been com- 
pelled to hire a large proportion of the help necessary to carry 
on these various operations, have also contributed to swell the 
expenses of this institution. 



SCHOOLS. 



The schools have been under the immediate supervision and 
instruction of Mr. Henry W. Stickney, aided by Misses Mary 



22 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

Reynolds, Catharine Woods, Lizzie C. Osborn, Catharine 
Chase, Julia M. Stickney, Fannie Northam, and Josephine 
Moulton. 

The whole number of scholars now attending schools is . 436 

The average attendance, ...... 421 

The number of boys, . . . ' . . . . 836 

The number of girls, 100 

The number who read and spell, ..... 286 

" read and write, ..... 86 

" read in primers, ..... 90 

" study Mitchell's Geography, . . 45 

" study arithmetic, .... 75 

" study primary arithmetic and geography, 90 

" study alphabet, . . . . .60 

The number in attendance upon the schools has, at times, 
exceeded the foregoing statement. 

The teachers have not only devoted themselves to the chil- 
dren during the usual hours of instruction, but have had the 
general care and oversight of them during the hours of recess 
and recreation, often accompanying them on excursions, and 
rendering those occasions doubly useful, by awakening in their 
minds an interest and love for the objects of nature. They 
have also been associated with the Sabbath School as teachers, 
and have attended the children in their evening devotions. 

Singing has constituted uniformly a part of the daily exer- 
cises of the schools, in which pleasant and profitable exercise 
the children exhibit a remarkable talent and proficiency. The 
singing in the chapel in the evening and on the Sabbath, is 
furnished by them. 

1 The proficiency of the scholars i*n their several branches of 
study, and their general improvement, you have had frequent 
opportunities to observe, and I trust will make due mention of 
them. The Chaplain, Rev. E. B. Wright, will report to you 
respecting the moral and religious instruction given in the insti- 
tution, so that any thing further in these departments will be 
unnecessary. 



1856.] 



SENATE— No. 7. 



23 



FARM. 

The farm has been under the immediate care and manage- 
ment of Mr. George Fisherdick. You will recollect that the 
farm last year was almost entirely neglected, from absolute 
necessity, on account of the limited supply of inmate help, and 
the large amount of labor necessary to be done in and about 
the house to put the establishment in successful operation. 
We therefore, as you are fully aware, found the farm this year 
in a rough, uncultivated, and fenceless condition. With this 
state of things, we began early in the spring, with seven yoke 
of oxen, clearing portions of the land from stone and putting 
them into heavy walls ; and in due season we had some twenty- 
five acres suitably prepared for planting, twelve or fifteen of 
which were covered with more than six hundred loads of excel- 
lent manure. We are gratified to be able to say, that, through 
the blessing of Providence, we have received in return an 
abundant reward for the labor and diligence bestowed in this 
department. 

Farm Account. 

The farm has yielded during the year as follows : — 
Hay, 12 tons, 
Corn, 104 bushels, 
Potatoes, 1,951 bushels 
Turnips, 31 tons, 
Carrots, 21J tons, 
Pumpkins, 16 tons, 
Squashes, 4,070 pounds, 
Cabbages, 7,000, 
Onions, 28 bushels, 
Beans, 7 bushels, 
Cucumbers, 40 bushels. 
Beets, 74 bushels, 
Pork, 1,519 pounds, 
Milk, 4,380 gallons, 
Veal, 335 pounds, 
The farm is also credited for the labor of men 

whose wages are charged to the farm account, 

and for the labor of teams upon permanent 

improvements. 



$14 00 


$168 00 


1 00 


104 00 


50 


975 50 


6 00 


186 00 


14 00 


301 00 


2 00 


32 00 


01 


40 70 


03 


210 00 


50 


14 00 


2 00 


14 00 


30 


12 00 


25 


18 50 


10 


151 90 


12i 


547 50 


08 


26 80 



$10,460 30 


3,504 25 


6,115 76 



24 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

Men, 290 days' labor, $1.00, .... $290 00 

Teams, 447 " $1.00, . . . . 447 00 
For drawing brick, lumber, and stone, for build- 
ing purposes, 

Men, 207 days' labor, $1.00, .... 207 00 

Teams, 300 " $1.00, .... 300 00 

Present inventory of farm, stock, &c, . . 6,414 40 



Last year's inventory of farm, stock, implements, 

Ac, 

Amount expended for the farm, for stock, hay, 

grain, &c, 

$9,620 01 
Balance in favor of the farm, . ■:.. $840 29 

Most of the labor which has been expended in raising the 
above mentioned crops has been performed by the Farmer and 
Assistants, aided by the largest boys, in the light work, such as 
weeding, &c, while our permanent improvements have been 
carried on by hired day laborers. All the inmate help we have 
had during the spring, summer, and autumn, has been quite 
inadequate to carry on satisfactorily the in-door operations of 
the establishment. 

The improvements and repairs that have been made, consist 
in the removal of large quantities of stone, building about 
three hundred rods of heavy wall, removing about forty thou- 
sand yards of earth from the rear of the buildings to the front 
and elsewhere, making eighty rods of road, building yard 
fences, digging and stoning vaults and sewers, repairing the 
roof of the main building, plumbing, painting and papering. 

With our present improvements and facilities, we may 
reasonably expect that the end of another year will show still 
greater improvements^ with much less expenditure of labor or 
money, and that far greater benefits will be realized from the 
farm, which will contribute to lessen the expense to the State 
of supporting these destitute, but in many respects, interesting 
and hopeful children. 



1856.] 



SENATE— No. 7. 



25 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The following statistics are furnished from the records of the 
Hospital, kept by William A. Griffin, M. D., who has had the 
principal care of the medical department. ' 

The number admitted into the Hospital from December 1, 
1854, to December 1, 1855, is 1,074 ; and in the several months 
as follows : — 



December, 














. 100 


January, 
February, 
March, . 














98 

88 

109 


April, . 

May, 
June, 














92 

52 

280 


July, 














84 


August, 














80 


September, 
October, 














44 

28 


November, 














71 



There have been during the year cases of ", 



Marasmus, 

Measles, . 
Smallpox, 
Typhus Fever, 
Chicken-pox, . 
Gonorrhea, 
Pleurisy, 
Synocha Fever, 
Gastritis, 
Ulcers, . 
Hepatitis, 
Ophthalmia, 
Typhoid Fever, 
Phthisis, . 
Sore Feet, 
Scabies, . 



Previous to the Subsequent to the 
change, June 15- change, June 15. 




26 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 
Cases — Continued. 



[Jan, 





Previous to the 


Subsequent to the 




change, June 15. 


change, June 15. 


Hydrocephalus, 


3 


1 


Pneumonia, 












9 


6 


Paroti'is, 












30 


21 


Rheumatism, . 












13 


1 


Syphilis, 












9 


1 


Sore Mouth, . 












38 


22 


Asthma, .... 












2 


- 


Abscess, .... 












2- 


- 


Gangrena Senelis, . 












1 


- 


Hooping Cough, 












29 


2 


Fits, .... 












5 


2 


Burns, .... 












3 


1 


Typhoid Pneumonia, 












2 


2 


Fracture, 












- 


3 


Sore Leg, 












5 


1 


Bronchitis, 












9 


2 


Dislocation, 












1 


- 


Fracture of the Leg, 












2 


- 


Intermittent Fever, . 












2 


- 


Fracture of the Skull, 












1 


- 


Peritonitis, 












2 


- 


Diarrhoea, 












13 


19 


Sprained Ancle, 












1 


- 


Old Age, 












7 


- 


Disease of the Heart, 












2 


- 


Frozen Feet, . 












1 


- 


Erysipelas, 












2 


- 


Leucorrhea, 












1 


-. 


Mania, . 












2 


- 


Synovitis, 












1 


- 


Gangrene, 












2 


- 


Worms, . 












2 


2 


Felon, 












2 


- 


Scrofula, 












7 


14 


Diabetis, 












1 


- 


Hemorrhoid, . 












2 


- 


Dysentery, 












5 


9 


Chlorosis, 












1 


— 


Puerperal Fever, 












1 


- 


Debility, 












3 


- 


Injured on Railroad, 












1 


- 


Sore Head, 












2 


9 


Croup, 












- 


2 


Fractured Clavicle, 












- 


2 


Teething, 












- 


1 


Influenza, 












- 


54 


Jaundice, 












- 


1 


Hernia, . 












— 


1 



The whole number of deaths during the year is 



132 



1856.] 



SENATE— No. 7. 



27 





DEATHS. 












Previou 


> to the 


Subsequent to the 


THERE HATE DIED OF 


change, . 


Fune 15. 


change, June 15. 


Marasmus, 




29 




7 


Stillborn, 




1 




- 


Phthisis, 




24 




9 


Typhus Fever, ...... 




2 




1 


Chronic Hepatitis, 




1 




- 


Hydrocephalus, . . . . . 




6 




- 


Measles, 




2 




- 


Marasmus and Pneumonia, .... 




4 




_ 


Gangrena Senelis, . . . 




1 




- 


Gangrene, ....... 




2 




. _ 


Fracture of the Skull, 




1 




_ 


Old Age, 




13 




- 


Convulsions, 




1 




- 


Pneumonia, ....... 




1 




_ 






1 




_ 


Paralysis, 




1 




1 






1 




_ 


Debility, 




3 




2 






3 




_ 


Fits, 




2 




_ 


Chronic Gastritis, ... 




_ 




1 


Croup, 




_ 




1 


Hemorrhage from the Bowels, 




_ 




1 


Typhoid Fever, . . . 




_ 




1 


Sore Mouth, 




3 




2 




102 


30 


The number of deaths in the several months i 


s as £ 


3llows :- 








26 




January, . 












12 




February, . 












IT 




March, 












23 




April, 












17 




May, 












9 




June, 












10 




July, 












6 




August, 












4 




September, 












1 




October, 












5 




November, 












2 





28 



ALMSHOUSE AT MOXSOX. 



[Jan. 



Several of those who died after June were cases that were 
unable to be removed at the time the change was made. 

Tii.^ Wn vrli,^ linro rliAil mirl^T nno roar r.-p n <rf» -~>Q 



JL ilC ~.*U. » LLK.I i.Li.1 > C U1CU LLJ.il.lCi 

Between one and rive. . 


uxix2 i cai ui ai;c". 


31 


five and ten, 


. 


19 


ten and fifteen, 


. 


7 


fifteen and twenty. 


. 


3 


twenty and thirty. 


. 


9 


thirty and forty. 


... 


4 


forty and fifty. . 


... 


6 


fifty and sixty, . 


... 


5 


sixty and seventy. 


. 


6 


seventy and eighty. 


. 


5 


eighty and ninety. 


. . . 


5 


ninety and one hundred, . 


2 


Over one hundred, . 


. . . • 


1 



A very large proportion of the inmates, when first admitted 
into the house, including children, exhibit evidences of imper- 
fect health, and. of course, become subjects of the Hospital at 
once. Last winter, the measles, chicken-pox, mumps and 
hooping-cough were introduced into the house, and prevailed 
for a while quite extensively. In many instances, these several 
diseases attacked the same subject in such near succession as 
to prove, in several instances, in the end. fatal. 

Ophthalmia is one of the most common and dreaded scourges 
of the almshouses. The foreign population seem strongly pre- 
disposed to it, and, in spite of the very best care and vigilance, 
it will propagate itself among so many children. But it has 
readily yielded to mild treatment, and in no instance has any 
one experienced the loss of sight, in consequence of that dis- 
ease, since the house was opened. 

Considerable mortality will be observed among children, 
especially of an early age. Many of these children are forsaken 
by their mothers in infancy, and thereby made dependent for 
their existence upon unnatural food, which, from imperfect 
assimilation, soon generates disease of the digestive functions, 
that finally ends in what is commonly termed marasmus. 

Scrofula is another very common disease among this class of 
persons, which exhibits itself under a great variety of forms of 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 29 

eruptive and glandular affections. It will, however, be ob- 
served, that a great diminution of disease and mortality fol- 
lowed the change in the character of our inmates. 

The children have been kept in the open air as much as pos- 
sible, and especial care has been taken to adapt the bill of fare 
to the season and to the several ages, with reference to their 
highest physical good. All the children have been furnished 
once daily with milk, and the smaller ones much oftener. 
Fresh fruit has frequently been provided, which has also proved 
conducive to their health. And I have the satisfaction of say- 
ing, that the aggregate of health has constantly increased, so 
that the amount of sickness we have had the past season has 
been much less than the average about us. 

CLASSIFICATION. 

The system of classification, you will notice, was carried into 
effect between the 18th and 16th of June, and has, therefore, 
been in operation nearly six months. It occurring in the 
middle of the. current year, and the many expenditures it at 
first created, to meet the necessities of the change, are circum- 
stances in the way of calculating accurately the utility and 
economy of the system. Still, we have experienced sufficient, 
perhaps, to enable us to judge something of its workings — its 
advantages and its disadvantages 

These institutions are intended to be self-supporting in their 
character, and, as far as is possibly consistent with the objects 
to be attained, this should be kept in view. ^ 

The expense of supporting a given number of children, of 
the age of those in this institution, cannot but be mj'e than 
that of supporting the same number of persons of iufuscrinii- 
nate ages and conditions. The children are generally healthy 
and growing, and therefore consume as much, if not more, 
than healthy adults. They must be educated, and a better and 
more vigilant care must be exercised over them, while, at the 
same time, they are incapable of affording any producing 
material in any way to lessen the expense of their support. 

The moral and physical benefits to the children, thus far 
experienced, arising from classification, cannot well be over- 
estimated, either in a present or prospective view. Undergo- 
ing, as they are, the process of developing their physical organ- 



30 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

ization, and forming habits which will compose their future 
characters, and also at an age when they are extremely suscep- 
tible — both to moral and physical impressions, for good or for evil 
— it would seem quite clear that good results to them must fol- 
low their removal from the effluvia of diseased and decaying 
persons, and the demoralizing influences which exist to a 
greater or less extent, where any considerable number of per- 
sons of the character and condition of those generally received 
into our State almshouses are collected indiscriminately. But 
the increased expense of transportation, the necessity of em- 
ploying more hired labor, the separation of families to such a 
distance, the injustice, in some instances, unavoidably done to 
the feelings of worthy parents, and the great inconvenience to 
which the western part of the State is subjected, are objections 
to the present system, so grave as perhaps to render some 
modification of it expedient and necessary. The district from 
which State paupers were formerly sent to this house does not, 
according to our best data, furnish a permanent number of 
more than three hundred. This number is less than half of 
what our house is capable of conveniently accommodating, so 
that there would be room for several hundred more. This 
number might be made up of children judiciously selected 
from the other almshouses ; or, suitable children might be sent 
directly here from the towns and cities in the other districts ; 
and with our present arrangements and facilities, the children 
could, for the most part, be kept separate from vicious and 
diseased adults, and thereby nearly all the benefits now en- 
joyed would be secured to them, without subjecting the Com- 
monwealth to the evils of the present system of classification. 
In closing, gentlemen, allow me to thank you sincerely for 
the kind and cordial support and ready cooperation you have 
always given me in performing the multifarious, and often 
difficult, duties imposed on me, in administering the affairs ol 
this institution. 

Kespectfully yours, 

S. D. BROOKS, 

Superintendent, 
State Almshouse, Mxmson, ) 
December 1, 1855. J 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 31 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse in Monson : — 

Gentlemen: — During the .year ending December 1,1855, 
religious services have been performed in the almshouse, — 
either by myself or by clergymen with whom I have exchanged, 
— on every Sabbath except one, when I was absent on account 
of poor health. The Superintendent of the institution, also, 
in addition to his other manifold labors, has, each Sabbath 
afternoon, previous to the Sabbath School exercises, spent a 
season with the inmates, reading a portion of Scripture to them, 
offering prayer with them, and kindly giving them much valu- 
able instruction and advice. 

It has been my constant practice to preach in the morning, 
and to assist in the Sabbath School in the afternoon. My de- 
sire and aim have been to speak the truth in love, and to speak 
so plainly that not only the adult persons present, but many of 
the children, could understand me. I think my hearers have 
given quite as good attention to preaching as congregations in 
general do. In the afternoon, I have commonly questioned the 
older children respecting the morning's discourse, and have 
been pleased to find that they remembered many things which 
had been said. Whether any have been savingly benefited by 
what they have heard, the light of eternity must disclose. 

The number of scholars in the Sabbath School, before the 
change % in the almshouse, which took place in the month of 
June, was, on an average, not far from one hundred and fifty. 
For several months past the average number has been about 
three hundred and sixty, and the whole number belonging to 
the school, about four hundred and twenty-six. 



32 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

Those who have been the daily teachers of the children, with 
a few others besides myself, have taught in the Sabbath School, 
and their labors in it have been very commendable. We have 
made use of the Consecutive Question Book on Luke, and the 
Child's Scripture Question Book, — both published by the 
American Sunday School Union, — together with numbers first 
and second of Banvard's Infant Series of Questions. Several 
of the teachers, with myself, have usually spent a portion of 
Saturday afternoon in helping the children to learn the lesson 
for the next day. It is my belief that the children have gained 
much important knowledge in consequence of their connection 
with the Sabbath School. 

The week-day schools I have visited occasionally ; and though 
I have not spent a great deal of time in them, I am satisfied that 
these schools have been well conducted and highly profitable. 
Having had frequent opportunities to . observe the children in 
various situations, I may say, that they have generally appeared 
contented and happy. Comparatively little quarrelling has 
been witnessed among them. It would give pleasure to the 
heart of any philanthropist, to see these children of misfortune 
enjoying their puerile sports in their hours for play. 

It has been my custom to offer evening prayer in the chapel, 
when the Superintendent has not chosen to do it himself. I have 
made visits to the sick, when it has seemed probable that such 
visits might be beneficial, and have also attended many funerals. 

In conclusion, I would say, that my field of labor has, on 
the whole, been more agreeable to me than I expected when I 
entered upon it ; and I hope it may be found hereafter that 
my imperfect services have not been altogether in vain. 

With much respect, yours, 

EBENEZER B. WRIGHT, 

Chaplain. 
State Almshouse, Monson, 
December 19, 1855. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 



STATE FARM SCHOOL, MONSON 



In addition to the offices, departments and duties designated in the By-Laws 
of the United Board of Inspectors of the several State Almshouses, the following 
are found by experience, in the present arrangement, necessary, and are hereby 
made, under the approval of the Inspectors of the State Farm School at Monson, 
with the rules and regulations appertaining thereto. 

Assistant- Superintendent. 

" Physician, 
Clerk. 
Supervisor. 
Farmer. 
Overseer of the Cookery. 

" " Bakery. 

" tl Laundry. 

u « Sewing Room. 

Watchman. 
Teachers. 
Miscellaneous. 



CHAPTER I. 

Duties of the Assistant- Superintendent, 

Section 1. The Assistant- Superintendent shall exercise a general supervision 
throughout the entire Institution, and see that every thing in the various depart- 
ments is properly conducted, and with especial regard to economy. 

Sect. 2. He shall see that all the rules and regulations of the Institution are 
respected and obeyed, and that the Subordinate Officers faithfully perform the 
duties assigned them. 

Sect. 3. He shall be in constant communication with the Superintendent, 
relative to the inteersts of the Institution, and faithfully report to him all cases 
5 * 



34 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

of neglect of duty or breach, of trust, of any subordinate officer, that may come 
under his observation or to his knowledge. 

Sect. 4. He shall give the directions of the Superintendent to. the subordinate 
officers, when required. 



CHAPTER II. 

Duties of the Assistaiii- Physician* 

Sect. 1. The Assistant-Physician shall have the especial care and oversight of 
the several Hospitals — he shall be in personal attendance upon all cases of illness 
that may come to his knowledge in the house, and see that they are promptly pro- 
vided with suitable care and nursing. 

Sect. 2. In all cases of severe, sudden, unusual or protracted illness occurring 
in the house, he shall forthwith inform the Superintendent and invite his atten- 
tion to the same. 



CHAPTER III. 

Duties of the Clerk. 

Sect. 1. The Clerk, in addition to the legitimate duties of the Counting Room, 
shall compare all the articles purchased and delivered to the Institution, with the 
bills of the same — he shall attend upon visitors, under such restrictions as the 
Superintendent may direct. 

Sect. 2. He shall, once at least, each and every week, count *all the inmates in 
the house, and compare the number with the Register. 

Sect. 3. He shall have the care of all groceries; as sugars, teas, coffee, &c, 
brought into the Institution, and see that they are used with economy and that 
bo waste be permitted. 



CHAPTER IV. 

Duties of the Supervisor. 

Sect. 1. The Supervisor shall have the care and oversight of all the sleeping 
apartments in the male wings of the house— the beds, bedding and furniture pro- 
vided for the same. 

Sect. 2. He shall have the general oversight of all the adult inmates, and ali 
who are capable of labor, and shall see that they have suitable employment fur- 
nished them. 

Sect. 3. He shall have the care and charge of .the clothing of the male inmates, 
and see that they are suitably changed at the appointed time. 

jSect. 4. He shall have the care and charge of the cellars, yards and out-build- 
ings, and daily inspect the same — and of all the provisions brought into the Insti- 
tution, and see that no waste is permitted. 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 35 

Sect. 5, He shall enforce obedience among the male inmates to the Rules and 
Regulations of the Institution, and faithfully report to the Superintendent or his 
Assistant, any thing improper, connected with his charge. 



CHAPTER V. 

Duties of the Farmer. 

Sect. 1. The Farmer shall take care of the farm, barn and stock — see to the 
•areful use and safe-keeping of all implements of labor — the vehicles — and proper 
treatment of all animals. 

Sect. 2. He shall have the charge of the teams and men employed on the farm 
or about the barn. 

Sect. 3. He shall keep a strict and accurate account for the use of the Clerk, 
in a book kept in the omce for that purpose, of all labor done by the teams or men 
under his charge — the sales and purchases made, connected with his department — 
of all expenditures in behalf, or receipts from the farm and garden, and the weight 
or measurement of the same. 



CHAPTER VI. 

Duties of the Overseer of the Cookery. 

Sect. 1. The Overseer of the Cookery shall have the care of the kitchen, dining- 
hall, dish-room, bread-room, and the furniture belonging to them, and shall see 
that food is properly prepared, in such quantities as may be needed, at the times 
appointed, and in accordance with the regular bill of fare. 

Sect. 2. He shall have the charge and direction of all persons employed in his 
department, and maintain good order and decorum among them. 

Sect. 3. He will be held strictly responsible for the judicious and economical 
expenditure of all articles of provisions and groceries delivered to him for the use 
of the family. 

Sect. 4. He shall always, before leaving his department, see that the fires are 
safe and the doors properly secured. 



CHAPTER VII. 

Duties of the Overseer of the Bakery. 

Sect. 1. The Overseer of the Bakery shall take care of the Bakery, store-room 
belonging to it, the furniture used in the same, and shall prepare bread and other 
articles pertaining to his department in such quantities as may be required. 

Sect. 2. He shall take care of all supplies furnished his department, and will 
be held responsible for their judicious use. 

Sect. 3. He shall have the charge and direction of the help assigned to him, 
personally seeing to the fires and fastening of the doors before leaving at night. 



36 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

Duties of the Overseer of the Laundry. 

Sect. 1. The Overseer of the Laundry shall receive all clothes that need wash- 
ing, and see that they are properly washed, ironed and returned to the places 
designated, without loss or injury. 

Sect. 2. He shall take care of the Laundry and furniture, and keep them in 
good order, attend to the fires and lights, and secure all the apartments under his 
charge, before leaving them at night. 

Sect. 3. He shall have the direction of all persons employed in his department 
and see that they are faithful in the performance of their duties. 



CHAPTER IX. 

Duties of the Overseer of the Seioing Room. 

Sect. 1. The Overseer of the Sewing Room shall have the custody of the Dry 
Goods, clothing and other articles intrusted to her care, and in no instance allow 
articles under her care to be distributed, except by the direction of the Matron. 

Sect. 2. She shall see that the Sewing Room is kept in good order and prop- 
erly secured against fire, or the entrance of any person, before leaving it at any 
time. 

Sect, 3. She will be held responsible for the safe-keeping and economical 
disposition of all articles furnished for, or manufactured in, her department. 

Sect. 4. She shall furnish, employment for all persons, either sewing or knit- 
ing, assigned to her department, and see that they are faithful and diligent in 
the performance of the duties required of them. 



CHAPTER X. 

Duties of the Watchmen. 

Sect. 1. There shall be two watchmen, who shall perform twelve successive 
hours' service, each alternately beginning at 1 o'clock and ending at 1 o'clock. 
During this time of service they shall be constantly awake, faithful and vigilant 
in the discharge of their duties. 

Sect. 2. They shall perform an hourly patrol around the whole establishment, 
and throughout the male apartments, for the purpose of discovering danger from 
fire, sudden illness, and any other occurrences. 

Sect. 3. They shall exert the upmost vigilance to guard the Institution against 
fire, and in case of such an event shall forthwith notify the Superintendent and 
subordinate officers, and not give a general alarm. 

Sect. 4. They shall attend to all the fires kept during the night time, ring 
the retiring and rising belJ, and see that the House is properly closed at such hours 
as the Superintendent may direct. 

Sect. 5. They shall perform any other service during the day time that may 
be required of them by the Superintendent. 



1856.] senate—No. 7. 37 



CHAPTER XI. 

School Department. 

Sect. 1. The Teachers shall have the charge and instruction of the children 
assigned to them respectively, and the school- rooms they occupy. 

Sect. 2. They shall exercise a general supervision over the children at all 
times, and inculcate upon them personal habits of neatness and orderly behavior. 

Sect. 3. They shall be associated with the Sabbath School as Teachers, and as 
far as is practicable, attend the daily exercises in the Chapel, and forenoon services 
on the Sabbath. 

Sect. 4, The male Teacher shall have the general supervision of all the 
schools, shall give the directions of the Superintendent to the other Teachers when 
required, and see that all the Rules and Regulations pertaining to the school 
department are fully complied with, make such suggestions from time to time to 
the Superintendent, as seem necessary to the welfare of the Schools — of any want 
of suitable books, apparatus, or furniture. 

Sect. 5. He shall always, unless excused by the Superintendent, be with the 
children on the Sabbath, and at 'their evening exercises, and promote good order 
and decorum throughout. 

Sect. 6. He shall have the special care, with such assistance as he may need, 
of all the boys while out of school, attend to their personal cleanliness, accompany 
them, or cause some of his assistants, while on excursions, to and from the dining- 
hall, and see that they behave orderly, and are kindly treated by all persons. 



CHAPTER XII. 

Miscellaneous Regulations. 

Sect. 1. All Officers and Overseers of the several departments shall perform 
the duties specified in the foregoing Rules and Regulations, under the direction of 
the Superintendent, and shall perform any other service that he may require of 
them. 

Sect. 2. The Overseers of the Sewing Room, Laundry, Cookery and Bakery, 
shall perform their duties under the direction of the Superintendent and Matson. 

Sect. 3. The Officers and Overseers shall forthwith report to the Superinten- 
dent or his Assistant, all instances of remissness of duty, ill conduct, profane or 
other improper language of any persons employed under them. 

Sect. 4. No officer or person employed in the Institution, shall appropriate to 
their own benefit the time of any inmate, without the express permission of the 
Superintendent or Matron. 

Sect. 5. No officer or person employed in the Institution shall receive or make 
any gift, or traffic with any inmate, without special permission of the Superintendent. 

Sect. 6. All officers and persons employed in the Institution shall enforce 
obedience among the inmates generally, to all the Rules and Regulations made 
for their government, and shall report all instances of violation to the Superinten- 
dent, for discipline. 

S. D. BROOKS, Superintendent. 

Approved, Sept. 1st, 1855, by the Inspectors. 



38 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE 

INMATES OF THE 

STATE FARM SCHOOL, MONSON. 



FIRST DIVISION— REGULATING VISITORS. 

1. No person is allowed to visit the Institution without permission of one of the 
Inspectors, or of the Superintendent ; nor any visitor allowed to communicate 
with any inmate, except by permission and in the presence of the attending 
pflker. 

2. No visitor is allowed to pass over any part of the House without having first 
entered his or her name and place of residence upon the Register. 

3. No visitors received upon the Sabbath. 



SECOND DIVISION— REGULATING LIBERTIES OF INMATES. 

4. All inmates of the Institution are prohibited from going beyond the enclosure 
without special permission of the Superintendent ; and no inmate shall be allowed 
liberty to visit his or her friends without permission of one of the Inspectors, and a 
ticket of the Superintendent, specifying the time of absence so allowed. 

5. No inmate shall be allowed the liberty to pass into any room or entry other 
than that in which his or her apartments may be, except by permission of the 
Superintendent. 

6. No inmate shall be allowed to use any tobacco, either for chewing, smoking, 
or snuff, without special permission of the Superintendent ; nor any one allowed 
to carry any light from one room to another, or in or about the buildings at any 
time, except it be a lantern ; nor is any inmate allowed to keep or otherwise have 
in his possession, any friction matches, or pipes for smoking. 



RISING, MEALS, &c, DIVISION. 

7. The Bell will be rung every morning at or before sunrise, when all inmates 
in health are required to rise and prepare for the duties of the day. The bell will 



1856.] SENATE— No. 7. 39 

be rung fifteen minutes before breakfast, forty-five minutes before dinner, and 
fifteen minutes before supper ; at which times all are required to put themselves 
in readiness for their meals, which will be announced by the ringing of the small 
bell at the dining-room door, when all (but the sick and otherwise disabled) shall 
immediately repair to the tables and take such seats as are assigned them by the 
Superintendent, strictly observing decency and good order. No food shall be 
carried from the kitchen or provided out of the usual times, except for the sick, 
infirm and infants. At eight o'clock every night the bell will be rung, when all 
inmates are required to go to their respective apartments, extinguish their lights, 
and retire to bed. 



CLEANLY AND SANITARY DIVISION. 

8. Cleanliness of all persons in the house is strictly required. It shall be the 
duty of all inmates to wash their faces and hands and comb their hair, immedi- 
ately after rising in the morning, and previous to dinner and supper ; also to 
bathe and change their dress as often as in the opinion of the Superintendent is 
necessary ; and on such days in the week as the Superintendent shall assign for 
that purpose. 

9. No filth or dirt of any kind is allowed to be thrown out of any window, 
or into any place not assigned for that purpose by the Saperintendent. 

10. Particular care must be taken that the house and adjoining lands be kept 
clean and neat. All occupied rooms, together with the entry and stairways, shall 
be swept daily, and scoured as often as is necessay to insure cleanliness; and no 
filth or dirt, or soiled clothing of any kind, shall be allowed to remain in any 
room, space or entry at any time ; and every thing about the beds or rooms shall 
be kept neat, in order and in its appropriate place, and all occupied rooms shall 
be thoroughly ventilated. 

11. Employment shall be provided for all inmates capable of labor, and they 
shall perform such, and so much service daily, as may be required of them by the 
Superintendent. Those who acquit themselves cheerfully and faithfully will 
receive proper encouragement; while the slothful and refractory shall receive 
exemplary punishment. No inmate shall be considered so sick as to be exempt 
from going to the tables or performing labor, unless so pronounced by the attend- 
ing physician. 



MORAL AND ItELIGIOUS. 

12. Religious services will be held in the Chapel every Sabbath, and will be 
announced by the Ringing or the Bell, when all inmates, who in the opinion of 
the Superintendent can with propriety attend, shall so attend. And every even- 
ing, at sundown or before, at the Ringing op the Bell, all who are able shall 
assemble in the Chapel to attend prayers. 

13. No obscene, profane or unbecoming language by any one in or about the 
House, or on the Farm, will be allowed. 



40 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. "56. 

14. All inmates of the Institution are required to obey, strictly, the subordi- 
nate officers and attendants of the Institution, in carrying out the foregoing rules 
and regulations ; and any inmate who shall violate any of the foregoing rules and 
regulations, or disregard the orders of the subordinate officers in the discharge of 
their duties, shall receive by the Superintendent, or at his orders, exemplary pun- 
ishment. 

S. D. BROOKS, Superintendent. 

Approved, Sept. 1, 1855, by 

Josiah Hooker, ^ 

G. Olcott Bliss, > Inspectors, 

Charles Richards, S 



SENATE "" .No. 7. 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



INSPECTORS 



STATE ALMSHOUSE, 



AT M ON SON 



DECEMBER, 1856 



BOSTON: 

WILLIAM WHITE, PRINTER TO THE STATE. 

1857. 
\ 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor, and the Honorable Council of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

In compliance with a Statute of the Commonwealth, the In- 
spectors of the State Almshouse at Monsoh now respectfully 
submit their 

THIRD ANNUAL REPORT. 

The Superintendent of the institution, in accordance with 
usage, has presented to the Inspectors his annual report, com- 
prising a history of its progress during the past year, and other 
matters of interest concerning it. And we annex his report to 
our own, as constituting a part of the same, and as affording 
such information as may be desired respecting the affairs of the 
institution. 

The exposition contained in his report is so full and explicit, 
that we do not deem it necessary to go so minutely into details 
as we otherwise should. Our purpose will be to refer to some 
of the leading points and facts presented in his report, so as to 
bring them more prominently to view, and accompany them 
with such remarks and inferences as they may naturally sug- 
gest. 

< 

The following statistical facts, which are taken from the 
records of the almshouse, are presented, in connection with 
other similar facts, in the Superintendent's report :— - 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



Whole number of paupers admitted since the institution was 

opened, May 1, 1854, to this time, December 1, 1856, 2,411 

Whole number from Dec. 1, 1855, to Dec, 1, 1856, . 1,252 

Number of males during the same period, . . . 737 

" " females " " .... 515 

" " children under five, during the same period, 117 

" " children between five and fifteen, during the 

same period, 104 

Whole number of paupers in the house at this time, 

December 1, 1856, . 713 

Males, 403 

Females, 310 

Present number of children under five, ... 72 

" " " between five and fifteen, . 456 

Boys, 293 

Girls, .......... 163 

Number of children having neither parent, . . . 105 

" " one parent, . . . 210 
" " both parents, . . .213 

:c boys bound out during the last year, . . 29 

girls " " " . . 13 



a u 

a a 



The state of the medical department is exhibited in that por- 
tion of the Superintendent's report which relates to this sub- 
ject. For the details, therefore, in reference to this department, 
we refer to that report, only adding the single remark, that no 
malignant or fatal disease has prevailed, but the year has been 
a season of general health among the inmates. 

For information in regard to the moral and religious state of 
the institution, we refer to the report of the Chaplain, the Rev. 
Mr. Wright, which is annexed. 



APPROPRIATION AND CURRENT EXPENSES. 

The legislature, at the last session, made an appropriation of 
$6,500 to pay the debts of the house, contracted the previous 
year, and for repairs and other improvements. Of this appro- 
priation the sum of 13,533.41 has been applied to the extinguish- 
ment of the debts, and the balance, viz., $2,966.59, has been 
expended by the Superintendent, under the direction of the 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 5 

Inspectors, in the modes and for the objects specially indicated 
in the report of the Superintendent. 

The expenditures of moneys drawn from the treasury of the 
Commonwealth, for the current support of the institution, are 
particularly specified in the report of the Superintendent, and 
all other matters relating to the financial concerns of the house. 
From the accounts therein presented, the following summary 
statement is made : — 

Whole cost of supporting the inmates duringthe year, $42,505 21 
Cost of supporting each pauper during the year, . 60 20 

Cost of same per week, 1 16 

The cost of supporting the inmates the last year was $ 1.08 
per week each, showing a small increase in the expense, which 
is to be attributed to the deficiency of pauper help in the estab- 
lishment, and other causes arising from the peculiarities of the 
location, and the character of the inmates. 

IMPEOYEMENTS. 

During the past year the same policy has been pursued in 
reference to improvements on the buildings and the grounds, 
as in previous years. Such as were deemed important have 
been originated, and gradually, yet steadily prosecuted from 
year to year, as circumstances and means would permit, with 
the hope that the institution, in this respect, would ultimately 
become such as it should be in its adaptation to the purpose for 
which it was designed. 

No expensive buildings have been erected during the year. 
A small joiner's shop has been built on the east side of the new 
brick building which contains the steam-engine and machinery. 
It was constructed principally from materials on the place. The 
steam-power is extended to this building by means of a shaft 
from the engine building, and is applied to the turning of a cir- 
cular saw and other machinery, and may hereafter be used for 
other purposes suitable to the place. A small building has also 
been put up to be used for the purposes of a dead house. 

The buildings have been thoroughly painted outside, and 
some portions of the interior. And some other similar repairs 
have been made on the buildings, together with material altera- 
tions in some of the apartments. 



6 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

Some slight improvements have occasionally been made in 
the cooking department, but none requiring much expense. 
The steam apparatus for cooking, washing, &c, operates with 
entire success, and fully answers our expectations in regard to 
the economy and convenience of the arrangement. 

A large well has been constructed in the rear yard, to provide 
an additional supply of water for the house. Stone walls have 
also been built on different parts of the premises, also suitable 
drains, fences, &c. 

On the lot west of the main buildings is a ravine about twenty 
feet in depth, through which flows a considerable stream of 
water. Over this ravine has recently been built a substantial 
cross-way of heavy stone, taken entirely from the adjoining 
lands. By this cross-way an important connection is formed 
between the east and west portions of the State farm, a road 
being opened and made over the same in a direct course from 
the main buildings to the farm-house and lands on the west 
side of the county road. 

The stone foundation of the cross-way also answers another 
purpose ; it serves as a dam to the stream that runs through 
the ravine, and thereby creates above it a deep pond of water 
for bathing, and for making ice for the ice-house. Heretofore 
the supply of ice has been drawn from a pond some miles 
distant. 

Considerable labor has also been employed in raising and re- 
moving large rocks and stones imbedded in the earth, on the 
lands in the vicinity of the buildings, with the view of preparing 
them for cultivation as speedily as possible.' This work has 
principally been done by a lever machine called Willis' Patent 
Stump Puller, which was bought for the purpose, at the cost of 
$300. The stones and rocks so taken up and removed, have 
been used for the most part in building stone walls on the 
premises, and the large dam mentioned above. The lot from 
which they are principally removed, is a lot of about twenty 
acres of the richest soil, and capable of producing large crops 
of hay ; and the sooner it is cleared and made productive, the 
better ; as the crop of hay from the farm is now so small that 
a large proportion of what is used must be purchased. 

While such purely substantial and useful improvements have 
been made, it has been thought not inappropriate to give some 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 7 

attention to the tasteful and ornamental. In the arrangements 
of the buildings and of the grounds, utility and convenience 
have been the primary objects ; yet, at the same time, the 
Superintendent has endeavored, as far as practicable, and con- 
sistent with a due regard to economy, to combine with these 
the elements of beauty and taste. With this view, the grounds 
near the buildings have been properly graded and moulded into 
terraces, and the walks and inclosures adorned with shrubbery, 
flowers, and shade trees. Fruit trees, also, of various kinds, 
and in considerable numbers, have been planted during the 
present year. All these and other like improvements have been 
initiated, that the place may not wear a gloomy and repulsive 
aspect, as if it were a jail or a penitentiary. It is in no sense a 
place of punishment, and should ever be kept free from all 
associations and purposes tending to give such an impression. 
The institution is emphatically a home provided by the Com- 
monwealth for her orphan and destitute children, and as such 
should have the comforts and social qualities of home. And as 
an institution of the Commonwealth, too, it should stand forth 
a fit representative of her character, to the view of all, both 
citizens and strangers, who come as visitors or otherwise, within 
its walls. 

In connection with the above, it may be remarked in reference 
to expenditures for improvements and other objects, it is diffi- 
cult sometimes to decide to what extent the agents of the Com- 
monwealth will be justified in going. It is not always easy to 
discriminate with precision between the various classes of ex- 
penditures, so as to determine what are of a temporary, and 
what of a permanent character. The dividing line cannot be 
distinctly traced, as the different kinds run into each other, 
some being of a mixed character, and partaking of both the 
above elements. There can be no doubt as to articles of imme- 
diate consumption — to what class they belong — such as meat, 
flour, vegetables, &c, &c. But there are other articles which 
are needed for use, not only now, for the current year, but for 
a series of years, as long as they will last, such as household 
furniture, farming implements of different kinds, &c. Some im- 
provements upon the grounds also may be said to be of this 
mixed character, partaking of both the qualities referred to ; 
such are sewers, walls, fences, &c. ; also improvements upon 



8 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

lands in reclaiming them from a waste and sterile condition, so 
as to make them productive. And the question frequently 
arises, whether such improvements maybe made under ordinary 
expenditures, or in all cases must await a special appropriation 
of the legislature. We have supposed that the Inspectors and 
Superintendent are to exercise a sound discretion in these mat- 
ters ; that while they would not be justified in entering upon 
new projects and enterprises requiring large expenditures, and 
not authorized by the legislature, yet that they are not to be 
restricted to so narrow a policy, that they cannot incur any ex- 
penses for purposes obviously required by the convenience, 
necessities and well-being of the institution, merely because 
they do not strictly come within the range of current expenses, 
or may not have been specially authorized by an Act of the 
legislature. The course pursued by every board of Inspectors 
or Trustees connected with our public institutions, we believe 
to be in conformity with the rule indicated above. 



CHANGE IN THE LAW- CLASSIFICATION. 

The legislature, at its last session, by the Act of May, 1856, 
entitled, " An Act concerning State Paupers," virtually repealed 
the law of the previous year, commonly known as the Classi- 
fication Act, which established this institution distinctively 
asa " State Pauper School," and if carried into full effect, as 
contemplated, would abolish almost entirely the system of classi- 
fication and separation initiated by the law of 1855, and restore 
the three State almshouses to their original parallel positions. 
Yet practically the character of this institution in this respect 
has not been thus far essentially altered under the operation of 
the repealing statute. A large proportion of the inmates are 
still children, and the principles of classification has also been 
maintained almost as perfectly as before. 

The explanation of this is obvious. The repealing law does 
not provide for the immediate transfer of children from this to 
the other almshouses, so as at once to equalize the proportion 
of children and adults in the three houses. The result, if finally 
effected, will be attained under the gradual operation of the 
law, by the reception of adult paupers in the ordinary way, or 
by the removal of them from the other almshouses, under the 



1857.] SENATE— No. T. 9 

authority of the governor. In this way there has been some 
increase of adults in the house, and a diminution of children 
by the withdrawal of such as have been indentured ; yet the 
children still largely predominate in numbers, so that the insti- 
tution may still be called a " State Pauper School." 

As the law now stands, this matter is placed entirely under 
the control of the governor and the Board of Alien Commis- 
sioners, to be determined by their joint action. 

For, in the first place, by the Act of 1853, entitled, "An Act 
concerning the State Pauper Establishments within this Com- 
monwealth," the governor is invested with the power of removing 
paupers from either almshouse that is full, to one that is not, 
and may, at his discretion, designate the class of paupers that 
shall be so removed, whether they shall be children or adults. 

Second. By the third section of the Act of May 16, 1856, (the 
repealing Act,) the Board of Alien Commissioners have the power 
of directing the State paupers of any city or town in the Com- 
monwealth, (by notifying the authorities of the same,) or any 
portion of such paupers to be sent to either of the State alms- 
houses, as, in their judgment, the interests of the Commonwealth 
may require. 

Whether, therefore, this institution shall retain hereafter its 
distinctive features as a pauper school, or the principle of classi- 
fication in any form be preserved, will depend upon the views 
and action of the governor and Alien Commissioners, unless 
indeed the legislature shall again interpose and regulate the 
matter definitively by law. 

The Inspectors and Superintendent of this institution have 
had an opportunity of witnessing during the last year the prac- 
tical operation of the system of classification and separation 
which was initiated under the law of 1855 ; and they have no 
hesitation in saying that the benefits which were anticipated 
from it, have been fully realized. Pains have been taken to 
make the separation as complete as possible ; and for this pur- 
pose the boys have had separate yards appropriated to them for 
exercise and recreation, and also separate rooms, both by day 
and by night ; and, as a general rule, the adults and children 
do not come together at all, except at the evening devotions, 
and at the public religious exercises on the Sabbath. And so 
long as the proportion of adults to children is no greater than 

2 



10 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

it is now, the desired separation can in a great degree be secured, 
by means of the present arrangements of the establishment. 

The above remarks concerning the separation of the children, 
apply more particularly to the boys. It is a matter of regret, 
that as the female departments of the house are now arranged, 
it is not practicable so fully to carry into effect the same rule of 
separation in reference to the girls, as the boys. It is as needful 
to the former as the latter ; for in their association with adult 
female paupers, they will be very likely sometimes to hear 
language or witness conduct that cannot be otherwise than of a 
corrupting tendency and influence. 

It is hoped, therefore, "that if the institution is to continue to 
be peculiarly a receptacle for children, some adequate provision 
will be made by the Commonwealth for the entire separation of 
the girls from the pauper women of the house. 

The salutary effects of the system of classification are strikingly 
manifested in reference to the children, both physically and 
morally. A large proportion of the children come here suffer- 
ing from bodily disease and previous destitution, and from causes 
also of a moral and social nature. But here they are placed 
under better treatment and more genial influences, and, as far 
as possible, are kept separate from all vicious associations. By 
such means, and with the kind care and supervision of those 
who have the charge of them, they soon undergo a thorough 
change in appearance, manners and habits, and are so trans- 
formed as hardly to be recognized as the same children. Any 
one who will visit this institution, and survey the happy and 
well- trained group of children here assembled, and witness their 
exercises in the week-day school, and the Sabbath school, cannot 
but see a striking contrast between them and the children of the 
foreign population in our cities and large places, living with 
parents whose habits of life are low, grovelling and vicious. 
When children of this description mingle indiscriminately with 
adult persons of the same class, whether in the community at 
large, or in almshouses, jails, &c, it is impossible to protect 
them effectually against bodily disease and moral pollution. In 
the best regulated establishments, where this association of the 
young and the old takes place, there is great danger of such 
contamination ; and the moral are more to be dreaded than the 
physical evils. Children readily imitate the vicious examples 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 11 

and habits of those with whom they are intimately associated. 
They easily catch the profane oath or the ribald language uttered 
often, or only occasionally in their presence. 

There is another consideration on this point, which ought not 
to be overlooked. Children of foreign parentage, by being con- 
stantly and exclusively associated with Americans in the relation 
of matrons, teachers, &c, generally soon lose, in a great degree, 
their early habits, peculiarities and associations as foreigners, 
and become assimilated to those under whose influence and 
instructions they are placed. Thus they grow to maturity, like 
the children of our own citizens, educated in the spirit and 
principles of our institutions,' and prepared to take their posi- 
tions, at full age, as intelligent and worthy members of our 
community. 

The children gathered here illustrate and exemplify the above 
remarks. No collection of children can be found any where, of 
equal number, who make better proficiency at school, or are 
more correct and moral in their deportment. Here they find a 
home and a school provided for them ; and all the benignant 
influences of the home and the school are combined to promote 
their present happiness, cultivate their social affections, and form 
their intellectual, moral and religious character. 

In this connection, it is pertinent to remark that during the 
first year after the opening of this institution, before the classi- 
fication law was passed, a much larger proportion of children 
were placed here than at the other houses ; so that almost from 
the beginning this has been regarded as more peculiarly an 
institution for the young. This was done through the agency 
of the governor, under his power to remove from one house to 
another, and for reasons that were considered at the time per- 
fectly satisfactory and well founded. It was supposed to be 
safer and better for the children to be in the country, as remote 
as possible from the corrupt influences and temptations that are 
always to be met with in cities and their vicinity. That in this 
situation, they would have fewer opportunities of mingling with 
such vicious and degraded beings as usually crowd into our 
seaboard places, and the penitentiaries and almshouses near 
them. The children also, in this position, at a suitable age, 
would be bound out to farmers, mechanics and others in the 
country, where they would find surer protection against a vicious 



12 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

course, and stronger motives for following a correct and virtuous 
life. 

The objection that is sometimes urged, that sending children 
into the country is a harsh and unnatural separation of them 
from their parents, does not seem practically to have any force, 
or foundation in truth. For no instance has ever come under 
our observation where the separation was not beneficial to all 
concerned. Certainly it is where the parent is vicious and de- 
graded, as is too often the case ; and in all other cases, where 
there is any well-founded objection to the separation, the ma^er 
can be satisfactorily arranged. 

Whatever may be done with this institution, we trust the 
Commonwealth will never abandon the principle of classification 
and separation in reference to its pauper children ; but that in 
some form, and in some place it will be fully carried into effect. 
Observers, both at home and abroad, express their unqualified 
admiration of this, as the most valuable feature in our system 
of supporting the poor. 

Most of the children now at the house are under .ten years of 
age, as those who arrive at this age are very soon selected and 
bound out. 

In regard to those already indentured, reports are generally 
received in the month of January each year, as stipulated in 
the Agreement of Indenture, from those to whom they are 
bound, and the same are preserved on file ; and it is gratifying 
to be able to report, that generally they are doing well for them- 
selves, and for those under whose charge they are placed. 

HOW THE INMATES ARE EMPLOYED. 

All the children of suitable age attend school during certain 
regular hours of the day. 

The boys of proper age are taken out almost every day in the 
summer season by sections into the field or the garden, and 
there employed, under the charge of their teacher, or some 
other person, in doing various kinds of work, such as weeding, 
gathering vegetables, &c. Some of the oldest boys are also 
occasionally taken into the sewing-room, and aid in making the 
clothes for the inmates, while they learn to do this kind of work. 
It is found rather difficult to devise modes of employing the 
boys regularly in the winter season, aside from their school 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 13 

exercises. It is hoped, however, that in due time this deficiency 
will in some way be supplied. 

The girls are taught in classes, under the direction of one of 
the matrons, to sew, and knit, &c, and are also employed and 
instructed in all kinds of household work. 

The adults are employed in various ways ; the women princi- 
pally in the sewing-room, but also in the kitchen, the laundry, 
the chambers, &c. ; the men in the field, the garden, the barn, 
at the wood pile, &c. There is no difficulty in finding work for 
all the adults of both sexes capable of laboring, now in the 
house, both in the winter and summer ; and all who are not 
disabled by disease or age are required to do what they can. 

THE SCHOOLS. 

The number attending the schools is 368, viz.: males, 234; 
females, 134. 

There are but two grades of schools, viz. : the Primary De- 
partments comprising the alphabet scholars and all others in the 
earlier stages of learning, in number, 186. This department is 
divided into two schools, one consisting of boys, and the other 
of girls, about equal in number, each being under the care and 
instruction of one teacher. 

The other department comprises all the other children above 
the Primary, the number being 182. All the branches usually 
taught in our common schools, viz. : reading, spelling, writing, 
geography, arithmetic, &c, are taught here. 

Mr. H. W. Stickney continues to have the general charge of 
the schools, and gives entire satisfaction in the management of 
them. Associated with him are five female assistants. 

The children in both departments have generally made very 
good progress, showing that they prize and improve the privi- 
leges they enjoy, and are faithfully and thoroughly taught. 

For other facts in relation to the schools, we refer to the 
Superintendent's report. 

THE FAEM. 

In relation to the modes pursued in managing the farm, the 
kind and amount of products raised, and other agricultural 
statistics, we refer to the Superintendent's report. 



14 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

While it has been a leading object in the farm labor, to raise 
as much as possible from the land for immediate use, much has 
also been done towards reclaiming those portions of it which 
are still in a rude and uncultivated state, with a view to make 
them productive as soon as possible. 

In prosecuting the various departments of labor on the farm, 
and also in transporting freight from the depot, (distant about 
a mile from the almshouse,) it has been found necessary to 
keep, during most of the year, a large team, consisting of from 
four to nine yoke of oxen. In the present condition of the farm 
and of the institution, (and even under almost any circum- 
stances,) this is thought to be true economy, inasmuch as in 
this way a team is furnished, fully adequate in strength for all 
the team labor required, without being overworked ; and, at the 
same time, they can be kept in such flesh as to be readily, from 
time to time, turned into beef, as occasion may require. This 
has been the policy pursued by the Superintendent in this mat- 
ter, with the approval of the Inspectors. 

COMPARATIVE VIEW OF THE PRESENT AND FORMER SYSTEM. 

The present system of supporting State paupers by State 
almshouses, is an enterprise which has not yet been fully tested 
in regard to the comparative expense and some other particulars 
of importance. It was foreseen and predicted by its friends 
that it would be attended with more expense at the outset than 
the mode previously adopted. Large expenditures would be 
necessary in the beginning for permanent fixtures and improve- 
ments, and in fully equipping the houses, which would not be 
required at subsequent periods. Yet a series of years must 
elapse before such an establishment as one of the State alms- 
houses can be put into complete order ; and all who are con- 
versant with the location of the Monson institution, will see 
that this remark applies to that with peculiar force. A large 
share of the pauper and other labor has been necessarily applied 
to objects which as yet yield no return, such as clearing the 
land of rocks, subduing the soil, &c. 

To form any just comparison between the present and former 
system as to economy, we must take into the account not only 
what was actually paid out of the State treasury, but also the 



1857.] SENATE— No. T. 15 

cost to the towns in addition to what they received from the 
Commonwealth. 

In reference to the matter of economy, the practical working 
of the new system in several particulars should also be taken 
into consideration. There are fewer paupers to be supported 
now than there were under the old system. Town poor houses 
were of near and convenient access, and received paupers in 
most cases to a comparatively easy and indolent mode of living. 
Hence, persons who formerly claimed the charities of the public, 
and voluntarily threw themselves upon the towns for support, 
will now, only in extreme cases, suffer themselves, as applicants 
for aid, to be conveyed to the State almshouse, knowing that 
they will be obliged to labor there as far as they are able. Be- 
sides, the impositions of pretended pauperism are less frequent 
and less successful than formerly, because more easily detected 
by the Commonwealth's agents. These agents also have better 
facilities, and apply more systematic and vigilant efforts in ascer- 
taining the true settlements or residence of foreign paupers, 
who apply for aid, than town overseers, under the old system. 
And when such paupers are thus found to belong to other States 
or countries which ought to support them, prompt and efficient 
measures are taken to send them back to the place from whence 
they came, and thus relieve the State of the burden of their 
support. At our railroad depots, and on the great thorough- 
fares of the Commonwealth, a vigilant care is also now exercised, 
to prevent the intrusion of foreign paupers into the State. 

LEGISLATIVE ACTION. 

In order that the legislature may be able to act understand- 
ingly in reference to the State almshouses, it is desirable that 
they should have all the light and knowledge on the subject 
that can be obtained. And, as one means of information, we 
believe that conferences between the committees of the legisla- 
ture, who may have these institutions in charge, and the In- 
spectors and Superintendents of the same, will be of great 
service in the discharge of their trust. And we hope that 
during the approaching session of the legislature, such confer- 
ences will take place, at" which there will be a frank and full 
interchange of thought and opinion in regard to the manage- 
ment of the institutions, and other matters connected with them. 



16 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

Another means of information are visitations to the houses 
by the regular committees of the legislature, or committees 
specially appointed for the purpose. In relation to this matter, 
we have no desire, nor would we presume to dictate the mode 
of procedure that should be adopted. Yet it may not be im- 
proper for us to suggest that in order fully to attain the object 
in view, viz., a true and full knowledge of the state of the insti- 
tution visited, that it may be fairly presented before the legisla- 
ture, more time should be taken for the visitation than is usually 
assigned to it. 

With this view, also, it seems to us that it would be expedient 
for the Inspectors and Superintendent to be required to meet 
the committee on such occasions, to answer any inquiries they 
may see fit to propound to them, and give all such information 
concerning the institution as may subserve the object of the 
examination. 

Such thorough examinations as are above indicated, would 
be far more just and satisfactory to all concerned, than such 
brief and superficial inspections as are sometimes made. 

ALLOWANCE TO TOWNS. 

The experience of another year strengthens and confirms the 
conviction we expressed in our last years' Report, of the inex- 
pediency of the provision for the support of such foreign pau- 
pers as cannot be removed to either of the State almshouses. 
Under the law making this provision, numerous and aggravated 
abuses have occurred. The physicians of the almshouses are 
constantly called away to examine cases of this kind ; and fre- 
quently the State is subject (through them) to this inconvenience 
and expense, when there is no just occasion for it. The mere 
bills of travelling expenses incurred in this way are very con- 
siderable during the year. And it seems to us that nothing 
short of an absolute repeal of the law will prevent these abuses. 

No allowance, in our judgment, should ever be made to the 
towns for the support of State paupers, except (if at all) in 
cases of extreme hardship, and then only by direct action of the 
legislature, on a special application from the aggrieved towns. 
Whatever inequality among the towns in reference to the sup- 
port of such paupers may arise from the repeal, will generally 
be very slight. And whenever the burden is peculiarly heavy 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 17 

upon any town, a remedy may be provided by the legislature in 
the way designated above. 

In conformity with the requirements of the law, the Inspectors 
have taken care to secure weekly visitations to the house by the 
members of the board, in succession during the year. And 
their observation on these and other like occasions, enables them 
with confidence to bear their testimony to the able and faithful 
services of the Superintendent, and of all associated with him 
in the management of the institution. 

JOSIAH HOOKER, 
G. OLCOTT BLISS, 
CHARLES RICHARDS, 

Inspectors. 
State Almshouse, Monson, ) 
December 12, 1856. j 



18 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPOET. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse , Monson : — 

Gentlemen : — I again have the honor respectfully to submit 
for your inspection the yearly statement of the condition of this 
institution. It will be recollected the so called Classification 
Act went into operation in the middle of the current year of 
1855, and was repealed about the middle of the present year. 
I am therefore unable to give you any important statistics per- 
taining exclusively to that arrangement — which is much to be 
regretted. 

The number in the institution at the commencement of the 
year, December 1, 1855, 688 

The number of Men admitted during the year, . 202 
Women admitted during the year, 141 
Boys admitted during the year, . 117 
Girls admitted during the year, . 104 



Total, 



564 



Whole number in the institution during the 
The number discharged and deserted, . 

died, .... 

indentured, 


year, 


. 436 
. 61 
. 42 


Total, 




. 539 


Present number of Men, 

Women, . 
Boys, 
Girls, . 




. 83 
. 102 
. 320 

. 208 


Total, 




. 713 



1,252 



1857.] 



SENATE— No. 7. 



19 



Present number under 5 years of age, . 

between 5 and 10 years of age, 
between 10 and 15 years of age, 
between 15 and 40 years of age, 
between 40 and 60 years of age, 
over 60, ... . 



72 

351 

105 

107 

59 

19 

713 



The number of children having neither parent, 

having one parent, . 
having both parents, 

Total number of children, 



105 
210 
213 

528 



The number of children having mothers in the institution, 103 

Largest number of inmates at any one time, . . . 752 

Smallest number of inmates at any one time, . . 647 

Average number through the year, .... 706 

Whole number admitted since the institution was opened, 2,411 



Nativities of persons admitted this year- 



United States, 
Ireland, 
England, 
Scotland, . 
Germany, . 



240 

243 

19 

16 

10 



France, 

Canada, 

Other countries, 

Unknown, 

Total, . 



2 
20 

4 
10 

564 



Nativities of persons now in the institution — 
Massachusetts, . . 341 Canada and British 
Other States, . . 83 Provinces, . ... 

Ireland, . . . 210 Other Foreign countries, 
England, ... 19 



34 
26 



Towns from which paupers have been received this year — 
Auburn, ... 1 Boston, . . . 100 

Amherst, ... 4 Brookfield, . . .1 
Agawam, ... 1 Blackstone, 1 

Adams, ... 7 Belchertown, . . 1 



20 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jam 



Becket, . 






7 


Northampton, 


14 


Bridgewater, 






1 


Palmer, 


150 


Chicopee, 






30 


Petersham, . 


1 


Clinton, 






4 


Pittsfield, 


6 


Charlemont, 






5 


Springfield, . 


45 


Clarksburg, 






5 


Southwick, . . ■ . 


1 


Cheshire, 






1 


Spencer, 


2 


Deerlield, 






2 


South Hadley, 


4 


Douglas, 






3 


Southbridge, 


11 


Fitchburg, 






2 


Tolland, 


1 


Greenwich, 






1 


Tewksbury, , 


19 


Grafton, 






9 


Tyringham, . 


2 


Greenfield, 






. 10 


Upton, . 


. 3 


Hancock, 






. 1 


Uxbridge, 


1 


Holyoke, 






. 8 


Warren, 


5 


Lenox, . 






. 5 


Worcester, . 


28 


Lee, 






. 5 


Worcester Hospital, 


3 


Longmeadow 






. 2 


Ware, . 


10 


Monson, 






12 


Westfield, . 


4 


Milford, 






11 


Williamstown, 


3 


New Braintree, 




1 


West Springfield, . 


3 


New Marlbor 


DUgh, 




1 


West Boylston, 


. 3 



Since our last annual report the number of children has 
gradually diminished, while that of the adults has increased — 
owing to the repeal of the Classification Law. In addition to 
those received from the five western counties, constituting the 
district recognized by the statute as belonging to this institution, 
one hundred have been admitted from Boston by order of the 
Alien Commissioners, in view of supplying a deficiency of in- 
mate help, which we had for a long time experienced. I am 
happy to acknowledge the timely relief thus afforded us. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

The schools which were formerly arranged In three depart- 
ments are now included in two. Mr. H. W. Stickney has con- 
tinued in charge of them, assisted by Mrs. Harriet E. Darte, 
Misses Lizzie C. Osborne, Katie Woods, Emma A. Stickney, 
and Fannie Northam. 



1857.] 



senate—No. 7. 



21 



368 



185 



The number of pupils in the schools Dec 1, 1855, * . 436 
present number of pupils, ...... 368 

number who read easily, ..... 115 

who read imperfectly, .... 156 

in the alphabet, . . . . .97 

who write with pen, . . . .85 
who write with slate and pencil, . . 100 

who study Common School Arithmetic, 15 

Mental Arithmetic, . . 48 

Intermediate Geography, . 9 

Primary Geography, . . 42 
Grammar, , . . .10 

Physiology, .... 1 

United States History, . . 1 

The proficiency of the scholars, and the excellent discipline 
of the schools, reflect much credit upon the industry and ability 
of the teachers. One or two evenings each week have been 
devoted to exercises in declamation, dialogues, singing, <fec. 
Familiar lectures have also been given to the children, upon 
various topics relating to education and general behavior. 
These various performances have been a source of pleasure and 
improvement. 

I would here acknowledge our obligations to Messrs. Merriam 
and Chapin, of Springfield, for their valuable present to the 
institution of a copy of Webster's Unabridged Quarto Diction 
ary, and a large number of interesting books and tracts, de- 
signed to please and instruct the children. 

FARM. 

Mr. George Fisherdick has continued in charge of the farm, 
in addition to the other duties required of him, and considering 
the limited amount of tillable land, he has furnished us a lib- 
eral list of products. 



PRODUCE OP THE FARM. 

14 tons Hay, at $15, 
510 bushels Corn, at 90 cts., 
492 bushels Potatoes, at 50 cts., 



$210 00 
459 00 
246 00 



22 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



185 bushels Beets, at 25 cts., . 








$46 25 


148 bushels Turnips, at 25 cts., 






37 00 


50 bushels Cucumbers, at 25 cts., 






12 50 


6 bushels Beans, at $2, . 






12 00 


20,000 heads Cabbages, at 4 cts., 








800 00 


20i tons Carrots, at $10, . 








205 00 


2 tons Squashes, at $3, . 








6 00 


6 tons Pumpkins, at $1, 








6 00 


12 tons Corn Stalks, at $5, 








60 00 


3,862 pounds Pork, at 10 cts., 








386 20 


127 Swine sold, 








509 87 


601 pounds Yeal, at 12 J cts., 








75 12 


3,900 gallons Milk, at 12J cts., 








487 50 



$3,558 44 

Prom the stock bought this year we have butchered 15,579 
pounds of beef. 



IMPROVEMENTS. 

The permanent improvements have been continued with as 
small expenditures as our circumstances would allow. Much 
of the farm is entirely useless as it now is — with labor it can be 
made productive, and a source of profit. Thus far but very 
little has been realized from pauper labor for these purposes. 
The larger boys, under the charge of Mr. Stillman Thurston, 
have been required to perform such labor in-doors and upon 
the farm, as they were capable of, but they are too young to 
render much assistance in blasting and removing rocks, con- 
structing suitable fence walls, and subduing the tough soil 
which has lain undisturbed since the creation. 

The following are among the more important improvements 
of a permanent character, made this year : Completing the 
front yard and terraces, and putting in stone steps. Considerable 
progress has been made in improving the rear yard ; the removal 
of the embankment has been completed, and a heavy bank wall 
built ; additional drains put in to carry off the surface water 
which was constantly accumulating in the yard. A reservoir 
well has been constructed one hundred feet from the building, 
with a capacity of 15,120 gallons, and capable of furnishing 500 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 23 

gallons of water per hour, in a dry season. This well is con- 
nected by a four inch iron pipe, with a double action force 
pump located in the steam boiler room, driven by steam-power, 
by which water is thrown into every part of the house. During 
from three to five months of the year we are dependent upon 
this arrangement for a large part of the water used. It also 
furnishes us means of protection against fire. Five hundred 
fruit and shade trees have been set upon the premises. Sewers 
have been constructed leading from the main drains and vaults 
to the garden and front lot, through which a small stream of 
water has been conducted, answering the double purpose of a 
sanitary measure, and furnishing an abundant and excellent 
fertilizing material for irrigation. A cross-way over a ravine 
and brook west of the barn, twenty feet deep, and ninety feet 
wide, which was commenced last year, has been completed. It 
is constructed of stones taken from the land in process of clear- 
ing. It affords the three-fold benefit of a convenient and direct 
access to the main part of the farm, a pond of water for summer 
bathing, and ice in the winter. Fencing the farm with sub- 
stantial stone walls has been continued, as we have had oppor- 
tunity. 

The principal improvements that will be needed the ensuing 
year are a piggery, and paving the rear yard. The soil is of 
clay mud, and of such a nature as to hold moisture, rendering 
it extremely unpleasant and annoying during rainy weather in 
spring and autumn, especially on account of the amount of 
mud carried into the house upon the thousand feet constantly 
going in and out. This improvement certainly ought not to 
pass another season. Our inmates will be employed so far as 
practicable the ensuing winter in view of accomplishing it. 

MEDICAL DEPAKTMENT. 

The comparatively small amount of sickness and mortality in 
the institution during the past year affords us renewed occasion 
for gratitude to our Heavenly Father. 

The whole number admitted into the hospital during the year, 
was . 456 



24 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



The number of births, 

deaths, ..... 

discharged, .... 
remaining under regular treatment, 
of cases slightly ill and convalescent, 



[Jan. 

22 



61 
357 

22 
38 



478 



The number admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 
admitted into the 



hospital in December, 
hospital in January, 
hospital in February, 
hospital in March, 
hospital in April, 
hospital in May, . 
hospital in June, 
hospital in July, . 
hospital in August, 
hospital in September, 
hospital in October, 
hospital in November, 



14 
15 

47 
31 
40 
36 
83 
69 
46 
29 
28 
18 



456 



List of Diseases. 



Abscess, .... 


7 


Chicken Pox, . 


1 


Abscess Mammary, . 
Abscess Lumbar, . 


2 
1 


Colica Pictonum, . 
Chlorosis, 


1 
1 


Abscess Psoas, 


2 


Cataract, 


1 


Amenorrhea, . 

Aptha, .... 

Bronchitis, 


3 

2 
17 


Caries, .... 

Diarrhoea, 

Diarrhoea, Chronic, 


1 

10 

1 


Bronchitis, Chronic, 


1 


Dentition, 


1 


Burn, .... 
Bladder, Chronic disease of, 
Catarrh, 


1 
1 
1 


Dropsy, .... 
Dyspepsia, 
Dislocation of Wrist, 




2 
1 


Cold, .... 
Croup, .... 
Carbuncle, 


17 
4 
1 


of Elbow, 
of Shoulder, 
Delirium Tremens, 


1 

1 
7 


Cancrum Oris, 
Cholera Morbus, 
Cancer of Nose, 
Cancer of Stomach, 


5 
5 
1 
2 


Dysentery, 
Dysmenorrhea, 
Erysipelas, 
Enteritis, 


5 
3 

6 

8 


Cancer of Uterus, . 


1 


Eversion of Eye Lids, . 


1 



1857.] 



SENATE— No. 7. 
List of Diseases — -Continued. 



25 



Epilepsy, 


1 


Jaundice, .... 3 


Fracture of bones of the hand 


1 


Leucorrhea, . 






2 


of Tibia, . 


3 


Measles, 






81 


of Claricle, 


1 


Marasmus, 






10 


of Fibula, 


1 


Neuralgia, 






3 


of Metatarsal Bone 


1 


Nephritis, 






1 


of Femur, 


1 


Opthalmia, 






2 


Fever Typhus, 


1 


Purulent, 




7 


Typhoid, . 


18 


Gonorrheal, 




1 


Ephemeral, . 


4 


Old Age, 




1 


Simple, 


11 


Pneumonia, . 






11 


Intermittent, 


4 


Piles, . 






6 


Gastritis, 


5 


Psoriasis, 






2 


Granular Conjunctivitis, 


3 


Parotitis, 






5 


Gastralgia, . . . 


1 


Pleurisy, 






4 


Gonorrhea, 


2 


Phthisis, 






19 


Hooping Cough, 


7 


Pleuritis, 






3 


Hemoptysis, . 


1 


Prolapsus Uteri, 






2 


Hepatitis, 


2 


Rheumatism, . 






10 


Hip Disease, . 


3 


Rachitis, 






1 


Hydrocele, 


1 


Rheumatic Iritis, 






2 


Hypertrophy of Heart, . 


1 


Synovitis, 






2 


Hematemesis, 


1 


Shaking Palsy, 






1 


Hysteria, 


2 


Syphilis, 






12 


Hernia, .... 


1 


Staphyloma, . 






1 


Hydrocephalus, 


1 


Sunstroke, 






1 


Influenza, 


15 


Tinea Capitis, 






30 


Injury of Spine, 


1 


Tape Worm, . 






2 


Inflammation, 


1 


Tremens, 






1 


Injured by Falling, 


1 


Uterine Hemorrhage, 




1 


Iritis, .... 


1 


Ulcers, .... 




10 



Deaths. 



NAMES. 


Age. 


Date. 


Cause of Death. 


Ellen Piggott, 
Nancy Piggott, 
Daniel Robinson, . 


6 months, 
35 years, 
74 years, 


Dec. 9, 
15, 
16, 


Convulsions. 
Phthisis. 
Old Age. 



26 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 
Deaths — Continued. 



[Jan. 



NAMES. 


Age. 


Date. 


Cause of Death. 


Mary Conoly, 


4 years, 


Dec. 


17, 


Marasmus. 


Ida "Worcester, 


6 weeks, 


January 3, 


Foundling. 


William, 


7 years, 




12, 


Injured internally. 


William Conoly, . 


10 months, 




21, 


Hydrocephalus. 


Robert Bird, . 


3 years, 




31, 


Unknown. 


Lemuel D. Faulk, . 


29 years, 


Febru' 


ry2, 


Chronic Diarrhea. 


William Green, 


62 years, 




6, 


Intemperance. 


James McAuleff, . 


45 years, 




12, 


Dropsy. 


Robert Collins, 


39 years, 




13, 


Disease of Heart. 


Thomas Dyer, 


2 years, 




16, 


Phthisis. 


Ellen Barrett, 


35 years, 




18, 


Typhoid Fever. 


Fanny High, . 


1 year, 




27, 


Marasmus. 


James Bird, . 


5 years, 




28, 


Scrofula. 


Christopher Walch, 


4 months, 


March 


17, 


Marasmus. 


Jeremiah Griffin, . 


30 years, 




31, 


Phthisis. 


William Jones, 


9 years, 


April 


5, 


Phthisis. 


Franklin Sherman, 


9 years, 




20, 


Inflammation of Brain. 


William Collins, . 


1 yr., 6 mo 




27, 


Hydrocephalus. 


Charles Bird, 


8 years, 




27, 


Rachitis. 


Mary Jane Harney, 


8 years, 




27, 


Phthisis. 


Bichard Shea, 


8 years, 


May 


8, 


Gastritis. 


Michael Noon, 


18 years, 




18, 


Phthisis. 


Catharine Murphy, 


7 years, 




18, 


Marasmus. 


George C. Wilkes, 


4 years, 


June 


7, 


Marasmus. 


Frederick Smith, . 


4 years, 




10, 


Measles. 



1857.] 



SENATE— No. 7. 
Deaths — C ontiime d . 



27 



NAMES. 


Age. 


Date. 


Cause of Death. 


Mary Douglass, 


1 yr.,6mo. 


June 20, 


Marasmus. 


Fanny Fitzgerald, . 


4 years, 


July 7, 


Croup. 


Patrick Shea, 


30 years, 


9, 


Pneumonia. 


James Smith, 


5 months, 


13, 


Erysipelas & Gangrene. 


Lyman Carr, 
Catharine Sullivan, 


4 days, 
1 year, 


14, 
19, 


Premature Birth, Syphi- 

lized. 
Bronchitis. 


Margaret Jones, . 


1 year, 


19, 


Measles. 


Robert Murdock, . 


7 years, 


19, 


Peritonitis. 


Joseph W. Nelson, 


7 years, 


19, 


Phthisis. 


William Glanz, 


6 weeks, 


23, 


Foundling. 


Anna McCarty, . 


2 years, 


26, 


Pneumonia. 


Michael Powers, . 


4 months, 


26, 


Congestion of Brain. 


James Dunn, 


6 years, 


21, 


Typhus Fever. 


Jane Mansfield, 


89 years, 


29, 


Old Age. 


Arthur Keef, 


22 years, 


August 11, 


Cancer of Stomach. 


Mary Powers, 


21 years, 


21, 


Phthisis. 


Julia Hannihan, 


2 months, 


24, 


Hydrocephalus. 


Patrick W. Green, 


6 months, 


31, 


Convulsions. 


Lewis Shultz, 


33 years, 


Sept. 13, 


Psoas Abscess. 


Eliza Hallihan, 


10 months, 


22, 


Marasmus. 


Charles Fox, . 


70 years, 


25, 


Disease of Heart. 


Jessie Freeman, . . 


- 


28, 


Foundling. 


Unknown, 


- 


October 1, 


Foundling. 


Caroline H. Wilford, . 


- 


2, 


Foundling. 


Henry Hampden, . 


- 


5, 


Foundling. 



28 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 

Deaths — Continued. 



[Jan. 



NAME. 


Age. 


Date. 


Cause of Death. 


John Greeley, 


60 years, 


Oct. 14, 


Cirrhosis. 


Martha C. Wedge, 


57 years, 


H, 


Cancer of Uterus. 


Thomas Barrinton, 


11 months, 


21, 


Scrofula. 


Ellen Glanz, . 


5 months, 


30, 


Foundling. 


Hannah Brown, 


37 years, 


Nov. 7, 


Phthisis. 


James O'Brine, 


60 years, 


7, 


Cancer of Stomach. 


Eliza Ann Sullivan, 


6 months, 


13, 


Enteritis. 


Cornelius Powers, . 


2 years, 


27, 


Marasmus. 



The number of deaths in December, 




3 


of deaths in January, . 




4 


of deaths in February, 




8 


of deaths in March, 




3 


of deaths in April, 




5 


of deaths in May, 




3 


of deaths in June, 




3 


of deaths in July, 




. 13 


of deaths in August, . 




4 


of deaths in September, 




4 


of deaths in October, . 




7 


of deaths in November, 




4 


The number of deaths under 1 year of age, 




, 17 


of deaths between 1 and 5 ys. o 


f age 


> 14 


of deaths between 5 and 10 ys. o 


f age 


» H 


of deaths between 10 and 20 ys. o 


f age 


1 


of deaths between 20 and 30 ys. o 


f age 


4 


of deaths between 30 and 40 ys. o 


f age 


6 


of deaths between 40 and 50 ys. o 


f age 


1 


of deaths between 50 and 60 ys. o 


f age 


1 


of deaths between 60 and 70 ys. o 


f age 


3 


of deaths between 70 and 80 ys. o 


f age 


2 


of deaths between 80 and 90 ys. o 


f age 


1 



61 



61 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 29 

The ordinary eruptive diseases, incident to childhood and 
youth, constitute nearly all the sickness we have had, except 
such cases as were admitted into the institution in a diseased 
condition. The general health and appearance of the children 
are greatly improved — they have a fairer skin, and a clearer and 
better expression of countenance. Opthalmia is almost entirely 
confined to chronic cases and recent admissions. Among the 
deaths are quite a number of young children, which, with a 
full knowledge of their circumstances prior to admission, would 
not be unexpected. The building erected year before last for 
idiotic inmates, has been used this year as a hospital for patients 
who, from the nature of their diseases, were objectionable to 
have in the main building. To this arrangement may be accred- 
ited, in part, the good degree of health enjoyed by our inmates 
• — and doubtless the health of the institution would be still fur- 
ther promoted by the removal of all the sick to a separate build- 
ing. 

My Assistant-Physician, Joseph W. Hastings, M. D., has been 
devoted exclusive^ to the sick, and I am happy to state that 
he has given entire satisfaction to the Superintendent and the 
institution. 

FINANCIAL REPORT. 

Cash on hand December 1, 1855, . . . $1,000 00 

Received from Treasury of Commonwealth, . 54,015 97 

Town of Harwich, for support of 

pauper, .... 7 00 

Town of Westford, for support of 

pauper, .... 14 00 

Town of Great Barrington, for 

support of pauper, . 32 00 



$55,068 97 



The Expenditures of the year are as follows : — 

For Salaries, Wages and Labor, . . . $8,579 67 

Dry Goods, 4,257 75 

Earthen and Glass Ware, Furniture, <fcc, . 789 77 

100 Iron Bedsteads, 400 00 

Silver Ware, 64 37 



30 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



For Clothing, (ready-made,) 








$342 69 


Hats and Caps, . 








509 13 


Boots and Shoes, 








1,898 50 


Leather, 








107 96 


817 barrels Flour, . 








7,141 91 


1,669 pounds Crackers, . 








127 62 


53,086 pounds Fresh Meat, 








3,180 25 


92 barrels Salt Beef, 








1,134 50 


659 pounds Salt Hams, . 








85 39 


100 pounds Sausages, 








12 00 


251 pounds Mutton, 








30 88 


Poultry and Eggs, 








20 47 


5,153 pounds Cod-fish, 








185 00 


half-barrel Mackerel 


> 






10 75 


1,372 gallons Molasses, 








470 17 


5,335 pounds Sugar, 








474 78 


938 pounds Tea, . 








293 07 


750 pounds Chocolate, 








112 62 


Coffee, . 








237 28 


1,716 pounds Butter, 








384 68 


1,137 pounds Cheese, 








118 31 


Small Groceries, Spi 


Lees, I 


fee, 




209 30 


430 pounds Lard, . 








64 50 


889 bushels Potatoes, . 








357 05 


38 bushels Beans, 








60 62 


1,832 pounds Rice, . 








87 02 


254 bushels Apples, 








168 12 


19,044 gallons Milk, . 








2,601 48 


Cranberries, . 








10 00 


195 gallons Vinegar, 








24 37 


13 bushels Onions, 








10 22 


1,622 bushels Corn, . 








1,393 50 


85 bushels Rye, . 








101 00 


210 bushels Oats, . 








101 42 


8 yoke Oxen, 








1,390 00 


97 tons Hay, 








1,402 38 


43 tons Straw, 








305 34 


Stationery, 








204 83 


Books for schools, 








72 41 


Medicines, Drugs, Alcohol, and Li- 


quors and Instr 


umen 


ts, . 


. 


594 77 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 


31 


For Brushes, Mops and Brooms, 


$231 64 


Salt, i 


74 07 


Plumbing, 


17 65 


321 gallons Oil, 


282 68 


57 gallons Fluid, . 


43 69 


486 tons Coal, 


3,636 20 


340 bushels Charcoal, . 


34 00 


102 cords Wood, .... 


306 00 


Postage, 


42 97 


Freights, .... 


530 89 


Telegraph, .... 


12 45 


Farm Implements, . 


226 40 


Stump Puller, 


300 00 


Boys' Sleds, .... 


13 00 


Tobacco and Snuff, . 


82 33 


Stoves and Pipe, 


419 34 


Oil Cloth Carpets, . 


209 29 


2,000 pounds Plaster Paris, 


9 00 


Single Buggy, 


50 00 


2 Buffalo Robes, 


17 75 


Soap and Sand, . 


437 02 


1,612 pounds Potash, 


. 124 56 


Blacksmi thing, . 


663 93 


Miscellaneous Expenses, . 


660 86 


Brick and Lumber, . 


459 08 


Lime and Cement, . 


85 40 


Trees, 


181 25 


Grass Seed, . 


63 58 


Nails, Glass, Hardware, &c, . 


878 55 


Pauper transportation, . 


846 99 


Appropriation for Books, 


150 00 


Labor on permanent improvements, 


2,797 37 


Returned to the Treasurer, 


500 00 


Cash on hand, . 


553 00 


Carried forward, 


$55,068 79 



150 00 




846 99 




7,716 40 




500 00 




553 00 






12,563 76 





32 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

Total amount brought forward, . . . . $55,068 79 

Deduct from this amount what is not included in 
the actual cost of supporting paupers : — 

Labor on permanent improvements, . $2,797 37 

Appropriation for Books, . 

Pauper transportation, 

Excess of this year's Invent'y over last, 

Returned to the Treasurer, 

Cash on hand, ..... 

Balance, (actual cost of supporting paupers,) . $42,505 03 

Average number of inmates, .... 706 

Cost of supporting each pauper through the year, $60 20 

Cost of supporting each pauper per week, . . 1 16 

CURRENT EXPENSES. 

It is difficult yet to arrive at the actual cost of supporting 
paupers under the present system, from the fact so much of the 
expense is occasioned by finishing and furnishing the establish- 
ment. Provisions were originally made for but three hundred 
inmates, since which they have been extended to accommodate 
eight hundred. But sufficient accuracy has been attained to 
show the superior economy of this system. In the first place, 
the expense per capita, independent of these contingencies, does 
not exceed what it cost the State and Towns together under the 
old system ; notwithstanding the prices of provisions and labor 
have nearly doubled. It also affords better facilities for disci- 
pline and reformation, and more efficient means for securing 
residences both in and out of the State for those who have been 
supported for years in the local almshouses, at the expense of 
the Commonwealth, as well as for those who are constantly 
falling into our hands. On the whole, the effect of the system 
has thus far been to diminish the aggregate of pauperism. 

We are now in fair working order for any number of inmates 
inside of eight hundred, and are prepared for the first time 
to express our confident belief that the expense to the treasury 
of the Commonwealth for supporting the institution will diminish. 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 33 



CLASSIFICATION. 

There exists in the community a good deal of misapprehen- 
sion as to the true character of these institutions. They are 
supposed by many to be the mere receptacles of a degraded and 
worthless class of foreigners, not really entitled to any con- 
sideration beyond furnishing them the bare means of subsist- 
ence, and hardly that. But look at the fact, that there are in 
this institution 528 children, and in the three State almshouses 
more than 1,000, nearly all American born, and constituting 
more than one-half of the population residing in them. Of this 
number 600 are of suitable age to attend school. This is cer- 
tainly a most interesting and encouraging feature of the alms- 
houses. Beneath their rough exteriors are latent qualities, 
susceptible, under proper culture, of being developed into 
characters as truly great and good as ever honored and blessed 
mankind. And the State is made responsible for the future 
well-being of these children. They are thrown by the Provi- 
dence of God into her arms for parental care and guardianship, 
and her duty, as well as her interest, demands of her that she 
should make suitable provisions for them. They must not 
only be comfortably fed and clothed, but means and influences 
must be provided to subdue their previously-formed bad habits, 
develop and unfold the better qualities of their nature, and 
inspire them with ambition to rise above their present condi- 
tion ;' and influences of an opposite tendency must be removed 
beyond their reach. While our charities should have a proper 
limit, we should not adopt so narrow a policy as to defeat the 
objects for which they are designed. True, we should seek the 
cheapest methods for accomplishing these objects most effectu- 
ally, but, at the same time, we should avoid whatever would be 
likely to operate unfavorably to them. This is true economy. 

The objection to the present arrangements is that while we 
are doing very much to ameliorate the condition of these chil- 
dren, we cannot protect them from the baneful effects of the 
bad examples and bad influences of the adult paupers with 
whom they come in contact. And so long as we are obliged for 
the sake of bringing the expense of their support within a 
nominal sum, to intrust them in any measure to the care of 
5 



34 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. 

such unprincipled and vicious characters, we cannot make them 
what they should be. These ill-devised arrangements will only 
insure the necessity of additional juvenile reform institutions, 
and thus continue to swell the expenses of the State for a long 
series of years. 

Massachusetts has won an enviable reputation for charity and 
benevolence. She gives freely of her treasures for the relief of 
her suffering and needy children of misfortune. But when we 
see her means so lavishly expended upon those who are bene- 
fited only to a limited extent, and who give but little promise 
of future usefulness, while these children who might be made 
an untold blessing to the world are so indifferently regarded, 
we cannot but feel that her charities are sadly misdirected. 
This is not owing to any want of philanthropy, but because the 
subject has not yet received the attention and consideration 
which it deserves. When the relation of these children to the 
State is fully comprehended by her citizens, it is believed there 
will be no further delay in instituting a thorough system of clas- 
sification in the pauper department. And we trust that day is 
near at hand. It is easier to prevent than cure moral, as well 
as physical disease. Who can estimate the amount of good 
accomplished by the various orphan asylums and kindred insti- 
tutions. It is to these primary departments of charity we must 
look in hope for a diminution of the now almost yearly new de- 
mands for reformatory measures. It is earnestly hoped this 
subject will receive the attentive consideration of the ensuing 
legislature. 

In the management of this institution the past year, it has 
been "the constant aim and endeavor of the Superintendent to 
overcome, as far as possible, the evils of our present arrange- 
ments. It has also been his anxious purpose to administer the 
government over those committed to his charge with a sensitive 
regard to their highest moral and physical good. In all these 
endeavors I am happy to acknowledge the hearty and efficient 
co-operation of my Assistant-Superintendent, Mr. E. Wright, 
and of all my subordinate officers. 

I take pleasure also in stating that we have received frequent 
visits from the Alien Commissioners, and derived much advan- 
tage from their counsels and suggestions, and through their 
agency have been enabled to relieve the State from the expense 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 35 

of supporting a large number of paupers, by sending them to 
other places where they were entitled to their support. 

In closing, gentlemen, I embrace this opportunity to express 
my thanks to you for the deep interest you have taken in the 
welfare of this institution. Not a week has passed but one or 
more of your number have visited it. You have always been 
ready to advise and assist me in the performance of my duties, 
and all our relations have been harmonious and pleasant. 

Respectfully yours, 



S. D. BROOKS, Superintendent. 



State Almshouse, Monson, 
December 1, 1856. 



36 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Jan. 



BUILDING ACCOUNT. 

Received from the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth, the Special Appropriation of . 

I have expended the same under your direction, 
as follows : — 



1,500 00 



For Building Debts contracts last yr., $3,533 41 



Painting, . 






671 45 




Labor, 






566 60 




Plumbing, . 






333 17 




Shafting and Pump, 






424 17 




Hardware, 






226 37 




Fire Ladders, 






150 00 




Papering, . 






65 35 




Glass Water-Gauge, 






50 00 




Slating, 






11 50 




Brick, 






75 00 




Lumber, . 






392 98 








$6,500 00 










S. D. 


BROOKS. 



State Almshouse, Monson, 
December 1, 1856. 



1857.] SENATE— No. 7. 37 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse in Monson : — 

Gentlemen : — I have officiated during the last year, very 
much as I did previously. Through Divine Mercy I have been 
able to perform services every Sabbath ; constantly preaching 
in the forenoon, and aiding in the Sabbath School in the after- 
noon. When occasion has required, I have visited the sick, and 
attended funerals. 

On week-day evenings I have commonly read a portion of 
Scripture, and offered a prayer in the chapel previous to the 
singing, and the repeating of the Lord's Prayer by the children. 

In the management and teaching of the Sabbath School, I 
have been faithfully assisted by the teachers of the week-day 
schools, and several other young ladies and young gentlemen 
connected with the institution. 

We have used the question books which were used last year, 
with the addition of Infant Sabbath School Questions, published 
by the Massachusetts Sabbath School Society. 

I have continued the practice of questioning the older chil- 
dren each Sabbath afternoon, respecting the morning's discourse. 
Religious instruction has commonly been given to the children 
for a short time on Saturday afternoons, and early on Sabbath 
mornings ; and the children, with the older inmates, have re- 
ceived instruction a while from the Superintendent, on Sabbath 
afternoons, before the Sabbath School exercises. The number 
of scholars in the Sabbath School has been, on an average, a 
little over 350. The number of inmates who have attended the 
chapel services, has usually been not far from 450. 

Books from the library have been read considerably by a portion 
of the inmates, and a good deal by the officers of the institution. 



88 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Jan. '57. 

The officers have been accustomed to attend on preaching in 
the chapel ; and for most of the past year they have furnished 
singing ; which, accompanied by a melodeon, has increased the 
interest of our public exercises. I feel that my services have 
been sustained by the example and co-operation of the officers. 

A majority of the inmates have appeared to receive religious 
teaching attentively. Probably the seed sown has, in many 
instances, found an unfruitful soil ; but, in other instances, 
good fruit, I have no doubt, has resulted, and will result from it. 

I can say that it has given me pleasure to preach the Gospel 
to the poor, and to direct the sick and the dying to the Lamb of 
God. Several who have been removed by death, have given 
pleasing evidence that they were prepared for a better world. 

The general behavior of a large proportion of the inmates, 
under the parental government of the Superintendent, has been 
satisfactory. 

I am happy to add that the week-day schools have, in my 
view, continued to be prosperous. 

Yours very respectfully, 

EBENEZER B. WRIGHT, 

Chaplain. 
State Almshouse, Monson, ) 
December 1, 1.856. \ 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. '21. 



FOURTH ANNUAL EEPORT 



INSPECTOE8 



STATE ALMSHOUSE, 



AT M ON SON. 



OCTOBER, 1857 



BOSTON: 

WILLIAM WHITE, PRINTER TO THE STATE. 

1857. 



€oinmoiwealtl) of JBa60ad)useti0. 



INSPECTORS 5 REPORT 



To His Excellency the Governor, His Honor the Lieutenant 
Governor, and Honorable Council of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

A kind. and beneficent Providence has graciously brought us 
to the close of another financial year ; and with it the Inspectors 
of the State Almshouse, at Monson, submit their Fourth Annual 
Report. 

The subject of Almshouses, and how far the Commonwealth 
should extend its liabilities on account of them, belongs to the 
legislature, being approved by the governor, to determine. It 
is our duty as Inspectors, in connection with the superintendent, 
to carry forward to completion such work as is placed by their 
wisdom in our hands : honorably to ourselves and usefully to 
the Commonwealth. 

The reports of the superintendent, physician, and chaplain, 
as presented to the Inspectors, are truthful, concise, and easily 
understood ; we therefore annex them to our own, as a part 
thereof, and worthy a careful perusal. 

The statistical information found in the superintendent's 
report gives as the whole number in the institution — 

December 1, 1856, 713 

Admitted, and born in the institution since Dec. 1, '56, <o6(j 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

Discharged, deserted, and indentured since Dec. 1, '5Q, 699 

Died, 42 

Remaining, ........ 638 

There has been an increasing demand for children from the 
institution, since it has been known that a thorough course of 
training and discipline has been established, and that the 
various means calculated to improve the moral, intellectual, 
and physical growth of the little unfortunates thus thrown 
upon the charity of the Commonwealth have been applied 
with even greater success than' the most sanguine friends of 
the institution anticipated. 

The legislature of 1857 appropriated twelve hundred dollars 
for the erection of a suitable building in which to place those 
afflicted with that loathsome disease, smallpox, and for other 
purposes. The building has been erected at a cost of about 
four hundred and fifty dollars, ($450,) and has already been 
occupied by six persons at one time, demonstrating' clearly the 
wisdom of the appropriation. It is located where no fear from 
infection can arise, and is at the same time easy of access from 
the institution, thereby affording a receptacle for the sick, and 
security for those in health. 

Of the balance, four hundred and ninety-three -^\ dollars 
have been expended in improvements and repairs, and the 
remaining sum of two hundred and fifty-six -^fe dollars remains 
in the treasury of the Commonwealth, undrawn. 

It will be seen by the superintendent's report, that the 
farm has commenced making a generous return for the labor 
expended upon it, and the Inspectors have encouraged bringing 
into subjection other lands adjoining that upon which so much 
labor was expended the last year, so far as they could employ 
the inmate help to rid the soil of stone lying scattered about 
the grounds, and placing them in walls which are needed for 
security. 

Owing to the scarcity of inmate help much has been omitted 
which ought to be done; but, so far as completed, the work is 
permanent and important, and such as will commend itself to 
the judgment of every candid witness. Much still remains to 
be done, and we concur in the view of the superintendent, 
expressed in his report, of the estimated value of products for 



1857.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21. 5 

another year, and the reduced expense attending the raising of 
the same. 

The schools are still under the instruction of Mr. H. W. 
Stickney, assisted by Mrs. Harriet E. Darte and Misses Woods, 
Stickney, and Elwell, whose indefatigable exertions for the 
good of their pupils have secured for them the confidence of the 
Inspectors and the respect of the schools. 

It is but justice to the schools to say that the children have 
a common degree of intelligence, and will compare favorably 
with village schools. 

The indorsement of the alien commissioners by their official 
act, in sending children to the institution at Monson, does honor 
to the good feeling and judgment of the commission, while at 
the same time it makes us feel that the classification of children, 
as recommended by us in a former Report, is the true course to 
elevate them to the dignity of worthy citizens. 

The committee of the legislature of 1857, as was their duty, 
and as it will be the duty of subsequent committees, visited 
this institution and entered into a thorough investigation of its 
affairs ; and permit us to add, that, in our judgment, nothing 
can be more beneficial to the institution, or gratifying to the 
officers of it, than that it should be visited by the highest 
functionaries of the government, and be made to pass the most 
severe ordeal at their hands. 

The report of the physician, Dr. Samuel D. Brooks, by whose 
skill and tact the medical and sanitary departments are enjoying 
such prosperity, is, as we believe, a statement of facts in regard 
to health, and the way to promote and encourage a proper 
development of the system, giving vivacity to the intellect, 
muscle to the frame, and cheerfulness to the countenance of 
each of the children — making them to feel that they should 
become virtuous and intelligent citizens, and that those having 
charge of them are interested to do all for them that is necessary 
in order to secure so important a result ; and aided by the 
assistant-physician, Dr. J. W. Hastings, who is in all respects 
adequate to perform the duties of his office, the work is accom- 
plished, and vigorous intellectual " responsibilities " are seen 
on either hand. 

The report, also, of the chaplain, Rev. E. B. Wright, is 
encouraging to the friends of morality and religion throughout 



6 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

the Commonwealth ; and no one who knows this truly excellent 
Christian man, retiring in disposition, modest in deportment, 
and untiring in his efforts for the good of the institution, but 
will say unhesitatingly, that his influence over the ductile minds 
of the children cannot but be felt through coming years, and 
over those who have arrived at maturity it is always for good. 

In conclusion, the Inspectors take pleasure in saying that the 
institution, in its superintendent and matron, has officers of no 
ordinary merit ; and their integrity of purpose, with an adapta- 
tion to any emergency — as well as the subordinate officers, by 
their fidelity and honesty in the Commonwealth's service — 
commend them to our favorable regard. 

For further particulars, suggestions, and explanations, we 
beg to refer to the subjoined reports herewith presented. 

G-. OLCOTT BLISS,) 

CHAS. RICHARDS, \ Inspectors. 

G. M. FISK, ) 

State Almshouse, Monson, \ 
September 30, 1857. ) 



1857.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshovse, Monson: — 

Gentlemen : — The following is a statement of the affairs of 
this institution for the ten months ending September 30, 1857, 
and is respectfully submitted to you for inspection. 

The number in the institution at the commencement of 

the year, December 1, 1856, ..... 713 

The number of Men admitted during the year, . 267 

Women admitted during the year, 138 

Boys admitted during the year, . 157 

Girls admitted during the year, . 104 

Total, . . . . . . . 666 

Whole number in the institution during the year, . 1,379 



The number discharged and deserted, 


631 


Died, . . , . . 


42 


Indentured and now out on trial, 


68 


Total, ...... 




Present number of Men, . . . . 


76 


Women, .... 


107 


Boys, .... 


298 


Girls, .... 


157 


Total, 




Present number under 5 years of age, . 


77' 


between 5 and 15 years of age, 


378 


between 15 and 40 years of age, 


. 112 


between 40 and 60 years of age, 


. 50 


over 60 years of age, 


. 21 


Total, ...... 





741 



638 



638 



8 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



The number of children. having neither parent. 

one parent, . 
both parents, 

Total number of children, . 



95 

206 

154 

455 



The number of children having mothers in the institution, 89 
Largest number of inmates at any one time, . . . 713 

Smallest number of inmates at any one time, . . . 575 

Whole number admitted since the institution was opened, 3,078 

Nativities of persons admitted this year: — 



Massachusetts, 


. 189 


Germany, . 


■ . 22 


Other States, 


. 79 


France, 


2 


Ireland, 


276 


Canada, 


. 17 


England, 


45 


Other countries, . 


9 


Scotland, 


20 


Unknown, . 


7 



Nativities of persons now in the institution : — 

Massachusetts, . . . 303 Canada and 



British 



Other States, 


. 


76 


Provinces, 


. 25 


Ireland, 




. 196 


Other foreign countries 


, 21 


England, 


• 


17 






Towns from 


which paupers have been received this year : — 


Adams, 


. 


7 


Greenfield, 


. 13 


Auburn, 


. 


1 


Huntington, 


1 


Agawam, 


. 


1 


Holyoke, 


. 26 


Bernardston, 


. 


1 


Hinsdale, . 


1 


Bridgewater State alms- 




Longmeadow, 


1 


house, 


, 


45 


Lee, . ... 


5 


Belchertown, 


. 


3 


Lenox, 


3 


Boston, 


. 


. 27 


Leicester, . 


3 


Chester, 


. 


8 


Millbury, . 


4 


Chicopee, . 


. 


45 


Men don, 


4 


Deerfield, . 


. 


2 


Monson, 


23 


Fitchburg, . 


. 


1 


Milford, 


17 


Florida, 


. 


1 


Northampton, 


20 


Great Barrington, 


2 


Northbridge, 


3 


Grafton, 


. 


1 


North Brookfield, 


1 


Gardner, 


. 


1 


Orange, 


1 



1857.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21. 



Oxford, 


3 


Uxbridge, . 


2 


Palmer, 


180 


Warren, 


1 


Pittsfield, . 
Eussell, 


9 

2 


Westhampton, 
Wilbraham, 


1 
1 


Springfield, 
Southbridge, 


76 

2 


West Boylston, . 
Washington, 


1 

6 


South Hadley, 
South wick, 


7 
1 


Westborough, 
Ware, 


1 

3 


Sheffield, . 


1 


Wales, 


2 


Shelburne, . 


1 


Worcester, . 


50 


Stockbridge, 


4 


Westfield, . 


6 


Sandisfield, 
Spencer, 
Templeton, 
Tewksbury, 


4 

2 
1 
1 


Worcester hospital, 
West Springfield, 
Williamstown, 


4 

8 
4 



SCHOOLS. 

The schools, under the instruction of Mr. H. W. Stickney, 
Mrs. H. E. Darte, Misses Katie Woods, Emma A. Stickney, 
and E. A. Eelwell, are in a good condition. One of the older 
girls, who has been a member of the school nearly three years, 
and who, through the personal interest and attention of the 
teachers, together with her own industry, has become qualified 
to teach, now aids in teaching. 



The number of pupils in the schools, Dec. 1, 1856, 
Present number of pupils, .... 

Number who read easily, .... 

who read imperfectly, 
in the alphabet, .... 

Number who write with pen, .... 
who write with pencil, 

Number who study National Arithmetic, 

Common School Arithmetic, 
Mental Arithmetic, . 
Intermediate Geography, . 
Primary Geography, 



144 

178 
48 

74 
93 



368 
370 



370 



167 

1 

20 
78 
12 
50 



10 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

Number who study Grammar, . . . . . 20 

Physiology, 1 

United States History, . . 1 
All the children have exercises in singing. 

Quite a number of children have been added to the schools 
from Boston, and Bridgewater State Almshouse, by the authority 
of the alien commissioners. The fact that those who take 
children from the institution into their families select the oldest 
and best scholars, whose places are filled with those younger 
and less advanced, should be taken into consideration in order 
to appreciate the improvement and true character of the schools. 
Notwithstanding this disadvantage, the general advancement of 
the schools exceeds any former period. It has been our endeavor 
to render them equal to any of our public schools, and a source 
of just pride to every citizen who bears any part of the burden 
of their support, and we are not altogether without evidence of 
success. 

FARM. 

The farm has this year materially increased its products over 
any previous year. It is also in a condition which promises a 
much larger increase next year. The potato crop is less than 
it would have been but for the rust. The first year the farm 
produced only eight tons of hay ; the second year, twelve ; the 
third year, fourteen ; and the present year, forty-six. The 
coming year, with an ordinary season, it will produce from 
seventy to ninety tons, at a moderate estimate, — thereby pre- 
cluding the future necessity of purchasing hay, with a stock of 
fifteen to twenty cows, three yoke of oxen, and three horses. 

From this source alone, the farm will in future contribute to 
the support of the institution, at least one thousand dollars 
annually. 

The productiveness of the farm, in other respects, has been 
greatly improved during the last two years, yet there is much 
more to be done in the way of fencing and subduing its rough 
but naturally productive land. We have an abundance of 
fertilizers of our own, and the significant question may be 
repeated, — Shall these resources be made at once available in 
the support of the institution ? The farm has been under the 
charge of Mr. George Fisherdick from the first year, and he 



1857.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21 



11 



still continues to discharge the duties of farmer faithfully and 
acceptably. 

PRODUCE OF THE FARM. 

46 tons hay, at $15, 
20 bushels corn, at $1, . 
280 u rye, at |1, 
400 " potatoes, at 62 cts., 
125 " beets, at 25 cts., 
300 " turnips, at 25 cts., 
10 " beans, at $2, . 
16,000 heads cabbage, at 4 cts., 
1,500 bushels carrots, at 28 cts., 
3 tons squashes, at $20, 
10 " straw, at $7, 
20 bushels peas, at $2, 
30 " parsnips, at 50 cts., 
60 swine sold, 
720 lbs. veal, at 11 cts., . 
5,400 gallons milk, at 12^ cts., 
4,200 lbs. pork, at 11 cts., . 

Beef butchered from stock bought this year, 

$4,788 42 

FINANCIAL REPORT. 

On account of the improved condition of things at the com- 
mencement of the year, we have not been under the necessity 
of drawing nearly so much money from the treasury as during 
the same time in preceding years ; and our present improve- 
ments, on the farm and elsewhere, justify us in predicting a 
still greater reduction of the expenses to the treasury the 
ensuing year. 

Received from the treasury of the Commonwealth, 
from town of Leicester, for the support 
of pauper, ..... 

for the support of pauper, 
from inmates, ..... 

Amount accrued from sundry small sales, dis- 
counts, &c, this and last year, 



$690 


00 


20 


00 


280 


00 


248 


00 


31 


25 


75 


00 


20 


00 


640 


00 


420 


00 


60 


00 


70 


00 


40 


00 


15 


00 


217 


50 


79 


20 


675 


00 


462 


00 


745 47 



$37,566 68 


5 


00 


1 


00 


18 


00 


1,446 


12 


$39,036 


80 



12 



ALMSHOUSE AT MOXSON. 



[Oct. 



The expenditures of the year are as follows 



For 



Salaries, wages, and labor, 


87,587 63 


Pry goods, ...... 


3,353 94 


Flour, 


4,781 00 


Meats, 


5,631 13 


Rice and West India goods, . 


1,534 39 


Milk, . . . . 


2,024 26 


Fuel and lights, . . . . . 


3,561 31 


Grain, ....... 


976 24 


Boots, shoes, and leather, . . . 


894 57 


Hay and straw, 


636 86 


Potatoes, beans, and apples, . 


897 39 


Butter and cheese, .... 


388 65 


Medical supplies, ..... 


377 38 


Soap, potash, and sand, .... 


355 11 


School books, stationery, postage, brooms, 




brushes, freights, express, farm implements, 




blacksmithiug, hardware, stove fixtures, 




vinegar, salt, and furniture, 


4,922 08 


Pauper transportation, visiting sick paupers, 




and lawsuit in case of settlement, 


984 54 


Appropriation for library, . 


130 32 



639,036 80 



The amount expended does not show the actual cost of 
supporting paupers, inasmuch as it includes expenses for trans- 
porting paupers to their places of settlement, ascertaining settle- 
ments of paupers, indenturing children, &c, &c. 

To keep the expenses of the institution within the popular 
prescribed limits, and render it in all respects satisfactory to an 
enlightened public, is a task not easily performed. Of the 
responsibility which the Superintendent has felt, under the 
circumstances, you have not been unmindful. 



IMPROVEMENTS AND REPAIRS. 

An appropriation of twelve hundred dollars was made to 
this institution, by the last legislature, for building a smallpox 
house, and for other purposes. Of this amount, 6943.60 have 
been expended, and the balance, 8256.40, remains to be drawn 



1857.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21. 13 

from the treasury. We have built a smallpox house, twenty- 
four feet in width by thirty-four in length, and one story high. 
It is very conveniently located and arranged for its purposes, 
and sufficient to meet all emergencies. 

The buildings generally have been kept in a good state of 
repair. The rear yard has been much improved ; considerable 
stone wall built ; several acres of land cleared of stone, and 
prepared for crops the coming year. The plumbing throughout 
the house has been rearranged, more effectually to protect it 
from injury by freezing. The cemetery grounds have been 
improved ; the boys and girls' play-grounds essentially enlarged, 
much to the happiness and health of the children. 

A small blacksmith shop has been arranged, for light work, 
under the carpenter's shop, and various other improvements 
have been made in and about the premises, with a view to 
convenience and economy. 

MEDICAL DEPAETMENT. 



The whole number admitted into the hospital, 


52T 


The number of births, 


25 


of deaths, 


42 


of discharged, ..... 


423 


remaining in the hospital, 


8T 


The number admitted into the hospital in December, 


51 


January, 


73 


February, 


64 


March, . 


56 


April, 


34 


May, . 


50 


June, 


56 


July, 


44 


August, . 


60 


September, 


39 



14 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 

List of Diseases. 



[Oct. 



Abscess, . 
Apoplexy, 
Amaurosis, 
Amenorrhea, 
Bronchitis, 
Burns, 
Caries, 
Chilblain, 
Convulsions, 
Carbuncles, 
Cancer of Lip, 
Cancrum Oris, 
Cholera Morbus, 
Cholera Infantum, 
Croup, 

Disease of Heart, 
Dislocation Shoulder, 
Diarrhoea, 
Dysentery, 
Dyspepsia, 
Enteritis, 
Empyemer, 
Erysipelas, 
Epilepsy, 
Fever, Simple, 
Typhoid, 
Intermittent, 
Frost bite, 
Fracture, Fibula, 

Scapula, 

Rib, 

Ulna, 

Humerus, 
Gonorrhea, 
Granular Conjunctivitis, 
Hydrocephalus, 
Hemipligia, 
Hip Disease, . 



10 

1 

3 

11 

26 

3 

5 

11 

2 

4 

1 

2 

10 

12 

5 

3 

2 

9 
4 
3 

5 
1 
5 
3 

11 
10 
7 
8 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 



Hepatitis, 

Hooping Cough, 

Iritis, 

Internal Hemorrhage, 

Marasmus, 

Masturbation, 

Molusca, 

Menorrhagia, 

Measles, . 

Neuralgia, 

Opthalmia, Catarrhal, 

Opthalmia, Purulent, 

Phthisis, . 

Pericarditis, 

Pneumonia, 

Parturition, 

Prolapsus Uteri, 

Piles, 

Parotitis, 

Potts Disease, 

Pleurisy, . 

Rheumatism, 

Rupture, Perineum and Bladder, 

Syphilis, Primary, 

Secondary, 
Synoritis, 
Scrofula, 
Scarlatina, 
Tinea Capitis, 
Tonsititis, 
Ulcer, Indolent, 
Varicose, 
Worms, . 
Variola, . 
Varioloid, 
Varicella, 

Total, . 



527 



Four amputations — one of the thigh, two of the leg, and one 
of the arm — have been performed : two for caries and two for 
frost bite. 



1857.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21. 

Deaths. 



15 



NAMES. 


Age. 


Date. 


Cause of Death. 


John Driscoll, 


75 years, 


Dec. 20, 


Apoplexy. 


Peter Keating, 


32 years, 


Jan'y 14, 


Phthisis. 


Mary Ann Gillchrist, . 


3 years, 


Feb'y 3, 


Bronchitis. 


Charles Huntley, . 


5 years, 


3, 


Typhoid Fever. 


Sarah Kerwin, 


25 years, 


11, 


Internal Hemorrhage. 


William Shehea, . 


6 months, 


13, 


Marasmus. 


Thomas Welch, 


49 years, 


13, 


Pneumonia. 


Patrick Piggott, 


41 years, 


16, 


Phthisis. 


George Coleman, . 


11 months, 


17, 


Hydrocephalus. 


Maria Doolittle, . 


9 months, 


18, 


Hydrocephalus. 


Mary Vanderpool, 


75 years, 


23, 


Old Age. 


Daniel Durfee, 


2 years, 


March 7, 


Marasmus. 


James McGrath, . 


12 years, 


9, 


Scrofula. 


Johanna Moran, . 


9 months, 


14, 


Croup. 


Peter Vanderpool, 


76 years, 


18, 


Old Age. 


Daniel 'Brine, 


46 years, 


24, 


Phthisis. 


Davis, 


2 weeks, 


April 3, 


Syphilis. 


Thomas Finnegan, 


1 year, 


21, 


Cholera Infantum. 


Ellen McKnight, . 


3 years, 


May 7, 


Marasmus. 


Thomas Hannegan, 


7 years, 


9, 


Hepatitis. 


John F. Kelley, . 


9 months, 


13, 


Marasmus. 


Lyman Curtis, 


1 year, 


28, 


Cholera Infantum. 


Francis Cadavin, . 


69 years, 


29, 


Swinish habits. 


Francis J. Palmer, 


9 years, 


June 1, 


Phthisis. 


George S. Clarke, 


48 years, 


12, 


Frost Bite. 



16 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 
Deaths — Continued. 



[Oct. 



NAMES. 


Age. 


Date. 


Cause of Death. 


George W. Biscoe, 


17 years, 


June 


18, 


Phthisis. 


Claunder Humphrey, . 


56 years, 




20, 


Phthisis. 


Ellen Doherty, 


1 year, 




20, 


Marasmus. 


Thomas Welch, . 


33 years, 




24, 


Empyemer. 


John Abbott, 


29 years, 


July 


1, 


Psoas Abscess. 


William Johnson, . 


75 years, 




3, 


Old Age. 


David Welch, 


4 months, 




13, 


Cholera Infantum. 


Bridget Morrisey, 


11 months, 


August 1, 


Hydrocephalus. 


John C. O'Brine, . 


8 months, 




12, 


Marasmus. 


Catharine Kurley, 


1 year, 




15, 


Cholera Infantum. 


Eva A. Wallace, . 


1 year, 




17, 


Marasmus. 


Bridget Lehee, 


18 years, 




24, 


Phthisis. 


James Sullivan, 


35 years, 


Sept. 


1, 


Pericarditis. 


Hannah Patterson, 


3 years, 




3, 


Potts Disease. 


Ellen Murry, 


16 years, 




3, 


Hip Disease. 


Mary Finnegan, . 


8 months, 




18, 


Marasmus. 


Dennis McGrath, . 


35 years, 




20, 


Disease of Heart. 



The number of deaths in December, 

January, . 
February, 
March, 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, 
September, 
Total, 



42 



1857.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21. IT 

The number of deaths under 1 year of age, . /. 10 

between 1 and 5 yrs. of age, 10 

5 and 15 yrs. jf age, 3 

15 and 30 yr^. of age, 5 

30 and 40 yrs. of age, 4 

40 and 50 yrs. of age, 4 

50 and GO yrs. of age, 1 

over 60 years M age, . . 5 

Total, — 42 

It will be observed that our mortality, recognizing the condi- 
tion and circumstances of those admitted, has not been large. 
Diseases have readily yielded to treatment, and the health of 
the institution compares favorably with any time past. 

The children, with but few exceptions, are healthy and 
robust, possessing increased vigor and more effectually resisting 
the common causes of disease. Among an average of nearly 
four hundred children, between the ages of five and fifteen, 
only one acute case has resulted unfavorably. 

The scarlet fever and measles prevailed to some extent in 
the spring and summer, but attended with no instance of 
fatality. Thirteen cases of smallpox have all recovered. There 
have been but few cases of opthalmia. The eyes are stronger 
and less susceptible to attacks from taking cold. No case of 
permanent injury in sight or appearance, either by accident or 
disease, has happened in the institution since it was opened. 
These gratifying results are due, in no small degree, to the 
healthful location of the institution, and care in the selection 
and preparation of diet. Among so large a number, whose 
systems have suffered from bad nutrition and neglect, frequent 
change, stimulating and carefully prepared food, are indispen- 
sable to improvement in health. Growing children, too, whose 
systems are undergoing important changes in the formation of 
structure, require a different diet from adults. The location is 
not only such as to afford a large limit for open air exercise, 
consistent with proper discipline, but from the elevation, its 
clear and invigorating atmosphere is unsurpassed in New 
England. 

Dr. J. W. Hastings, my medical assistant, has rendered me 
valuable service in this department. 



18 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

It is an alleviating circumstance to the heavy burden which 
this class of expenditures imposes upon the people of the 
Commonwealth, that out of an average of six hundred and 
forty persons supported in this institution, nearly four hundred 
are at an age wnich brings them under the training and 
discipline of the school department, where they enjoy the best 
advantages for instruction and improvement, while but for 
such provisions they would be most likely to become any thing 
but desirable members of society. If, by any means, good 
citizens can be made out of a large number of those who, 
if left to themselves, would become the pest and ruin of 
society, it is obviously a wise policy to use such means for such 
ends. 

The sentiments which I have formerly expressed in regard to 
the utility and importance of the classification of State paupers, 
as a settled policy, remain unchanged. 

Before multiplying institutions for the relief or improvement 
of the various conditions of society, would it not be good policy 
for the State to take some pains to ascertain whether the wants 
of society may not be met better, and with less expense, by 
improving or changing the character and arrangements of those 
institutions already provided ? For instance, let one of these 
institutions be recognized and fostered, as designed to prevent 
the development of criminals among that class of children who 
are congregated in the State almshouses, and would not a 
prolific source of vice be in a great measure removed, and the 
necessity of so extensive provisions for reforming already 
developed criminals, greatly diminished ? 

The old adage, u an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of 
cure," expresses the true policy of economy in the bestowment 
of our public charities, and one which is deserving of very care- 
ful attention. 

I feel under obligations to the Alien Commissioners for the 
interest which they have manifested in the prosperity of the 
institution, and for the assistance they have rendered me. I 
acknowledge, also, in the management of the institution, the 
faithful services of Mr. B. Wright, my Assistant-Superintendent 
for the last three years. I can only speak in terms of approba- 
tion of all my other officers for their faithfulness and common 



1857.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21. 19 

desire to promote the best interests of the institution. I 
express my indebtedness to you, gentlemen, for your kindness 
to myself and my family, and the readiness with which you 
have at all times advised and sustained me in the discharge of 
my duties. 



Respectfully, 



S. D. BROOKS, 
Superintendent and Physician. 



State Almshouse, Monson, 
September 30, 1857. 



20 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 



CHAPLAIN'S HEPOET 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, at Monson : — 

Gentlemen : — My field of labor is, in my view, an interesting 
one. I often think that there is a striking resemblance between 
persons to whom I am called to minister, and those to whom 
the Saviour ministered, when he dwelt on earth. It devolves 
on me to seek the spiritual good of the poor, the lame, 
the blind, and the sick. There are in our congregation those 
who have been taught erroneous sentiments, those who have 
been grossly immoral, those who appear to be hardened sinners, 
with some who seetn " not far from the kingdom of God," and 
a few who give evidence of true piety. Nearly an hundred 
adult inmates, more than three hundred children, and also 
most of the officers of the institution, have commonly been 
present at our Sabbath meetings. We have had excellent sing- 
ing, and a good degree of interest has been manifested in the 
exercises generally. I have myself preached in the chapel, 
since the last yearly report, on all the Sabbath mornings but 
two ; and on those I procured a supply, by exchanging with 
other ministers. As in past years, I have superintended the 
Sabbath school, and aided in teaching on Sabbath afternoons. 
The school teachers, and several others, have commendably 
assisted in the Sabbath school. Many children, who were 
among the most forward the last year, have been removed from 
the institution, and others have been admitted. The number 
and attainments of the Sabbath school, therefore, do not appear 
to vary much from what they were a year ago. Dr. Brooks, 
the faithful superintendent of the institution, has given instruc- 
tion to the inmates on Sabbath afternoons, previous to the 
Sabbath school exercises, as in former years. I have conducted 



1857.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 21. 21 

evening worship in the chapel, visited the sick and afflicted, and 
attended funerals, as usual. 

In regard to the result of efforts to promote the good of the 
inmates, it may be remarked, that much immorality has proba- 
bly been prevented ; those who gave evidence of piety when 
they came to the institution, have appeared to be in a measure 
edified ; now and then an instance of true conversion, it is 
hoped, has occurred ; and it can hardly be questioned, that the 
instruction which the children have received will, with the 
divine blessing, prove of great advantage to many. In view of 
my own services, however, I feel that I have no occasion for 
boasting. 

Very respectfully yours, 

EBENEZER B. WRIGHT, 

Chaplain. 

State Almshouse, Monson, ) 
September 30, 185T. J 



& Jiin^ ■, 7 

PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 29. 

FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



INSPECTORS 



STATE ALMSHOUSE, 



AT MONSON. 



OCTOBER, 1858 



BOSTON: 

WILLIAM WHITE, PMNTER TO THE STATE. 
1858. 



(EommomDealtt) of Jtta00ad)U0ett0. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT 



To His Excellency the Governor, and the Honorable Council: — 

la compliance with law and custom, the Inspectors of the 
State almshouse at Monson submit their Annual Report for the 
year ending September 30, 1858. 

THE PAST YEAR. 

The financial revulsion of 1857 threw into the State alms- 
houses, during last autumn and winter, a larger number of 
paupers than they had ever before contained. The institution 
under our inspection, which had not at any previous time 
accommodated over seven hundred and thirteen, rapidly filled 
till the number reached nearly eleven hundred. As the build- 
ings were not originally designed for more than five hundred 
inmates, to provide for so large an increase was a source of 
much anxiety to Superintendent and Inspectors. Temporary 
lodging places were prepared, and a building occupied for a 
wood-house and shoemaker's shop was converted into a hospi- 
tal for males, and the hospital room vacated in one of the wings 
of the main building was changed to a dormitory. By this 
arrangement all persons sent to the institution have been 
temporarily or permanently accommodated. The new hospital, 
in its isolated position, secures quiet for the sick and less 
exposure in case of fire. 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT l^ONSON. [Oct. 

The number of inmates in the institution September 30, 

1857, was, 638 

Admitted and born since September 30, 1857, . . 2,300 
Discharged, indentured, deserted, and died during the 

year, ..." 2,373 

Remaining September, 30, 1858, 565 

Average number supported during the year, . . 823 

Increase over the average number supported last year, 179 

Further statistics and particulars relating to inmates, may be 
found in the Superintendent's report, annexed to our own. 

THE FARM. 

The farm lias this year yielded a generous increase over pre- 
vious years. The crop of hay already gathered amounts to 
eighty-five tons — being an increase of thirty-nine tons over last 
year's crop. It is estimated that the crop of potatoes will be 
nearly five hundred bushels larger than that of last year, while 
the quantity of garden vegetables will fully equal any previous 
crop. 

The last winter was highly favorable for making improve- 
ments upon the farm, and all able-bodied male inmates were 
constantly employed in clearing rocks and stumps from the 
soil. Six acres were thus fitted for cultivation, besides build- 
ing one hundred and seventy five-rods of stone wall. Prom 
five to seven acres will be converted into grass land this fall ; 
several acres of wet soil will be drained, and about eight acres 
of waste land will be reclaimed another year. 

The Inspectors believe that all the unwooded portion of the 
farm, not needed for the cultivation of garden vegetables and 
potatoes, should be converted into mowland and pasturage. 
When this is accomplished a large portion of the milk, which 
now costs the State nearly $3,000 a year, may be produced on 
the farm. 

THE SCHOOLS. 

Mr. H. W. Stickney, who for four and a half years had faith- 
fully discharged the office of superintending teacher of the 
schools, resigned on the first of April last, since which time 
Mrs. Harriet E. Darte has had supervision of the schools, 



1858.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 5 

assisted by Misses Elwell, Woods, Crocker and Condon. 
When it is considered that nearly all the children enter the 
institution without the rudiments of education, it is surprising 
to witness the talent and advancement which a thorough and 
systematic course of instruction develops. 

The first business of the teacher is to instruct them in habits 
and principles which form character — to inspire them with an 
ambition to be something more than paupers — to instill into 
their minds an abhorrence of every thing that is wrong, and an 
admiration of whatever is right. They are taught to believe 
that if they form habits of honesty, industry and perseverance, 
they will soon find pleasant homes, out of the institution, where 
they will grow up to become respectable men and women. 
They are encouraged by daily singing in the schools, by occa- 
sional exhibitions, holidays, parades, and rambles over the 
farm with their teachers. In all their recreations there is sel- 
dom any quarreling or contention. In their play-yards they 
cultivate flowers and vegetables, and in the season of gardening 
the boys go out to assist the men in removing weeds from the 
soil. This is the process of preparing these little " unfortu- 
nates " for entering families. The results may be seen in their 
cheerful countenances, vigorous constitutions, and their anxiety 
to be transferred from a State almshouse to the quiet homes of 
farmers and mechanics. 

BINDING OUT CHILDREN. 

The almshouse is almost daily visited by persons desirous of 
taking children, and, while the Inspectors have succeeded in 
finding homes for a large number, many more could have been 
indentured had they been older. Those who take children are 
generally farmers who desire boys and girls large enough to 
render immediate assistance. In the majority of cases the chil- 
dren indentured give satisfaction, and furnish evidence that 
they are growing up to become useful citizens. 

The Inspectors have adopted the practise of sending yearly to 
guardians of indentured children for a report of their conduct, 
habits, health and advancement during the year. The returns 
are usually of a most encouraging nature. They have also 
adopted the practise of advertising for situations, and they be- 
lieve that the employment of an agent by the State, in finding 



6 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

homes for the children in its charitable institutions, would be 
attended with success. 

CLASSIFICATION OP PAUPERS. 

This subject has been so frequently alluded to in previous 
Reports, that we deem further arguments in its favor unneces- 
sary. So far as is possible the children in this institution are 
separated from adults. The wider this separation the easier it 
is to discipline the children, and the less liable are they to 
become contaminated by the vicious habits of older inmates. 

SANITARY CONDITION. 

To the favorable location of the institution, an invigorating 
mountain air, pure water, wholesome food, and the successful 
attentions of Dr. J. W. Hastings, the Physician, may be attrib- 
uted the healthy condition of the inmates. Although the num- 
ber of deaths has been larger this year than last, the causes for 
this increase are set forth in the Physician's report, to which we 
invite attention. There have been one thousand and thirty-two 
admissions to the hospital during the year, and one hundred 
and two deaths. 

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS. 

Religious services have been continued as heretofore by Rev. 
E. B. Wright, Chaplain of the institution. His efforts in behalf 
of both young and old have been attended with gratifying suc- 
cess. Preaching is customary on the Sabbath, prayer is at- 
tended every evening, and the Sabbath school is an interesting 
feature in the moral training of juvenile inmates. For further 
particulars on this subject we refer to the Chaplain's report. 

RETRENCHMENT. 

In accordance with the prevailing desire for retrenchment in 
State expenses, the salaries of subordinate officers connected 
with this institution have been reduced, and the services of sev- 
eral assistants dispensed with. The resident carpenter, who 
had received a salary of $600 a year, was discharged early in 
the spring, the buildings being in such a state of repair as to 
need his services no longer. The withdrawal of Mr. Stickney 
from the schools, and the substitution of a female teacher, con- 



1858.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 7 

siderably reduced expenses in that department; though the 
Inspectors are of opinion that the interests of the schools de- 
mand a male teacher at their head, and they have engaged Mr. 
E. M. Brown, of South Adams, who comes well recommended 
for the position. Mr. Brown takes the place of a female 
teacher, and, with the assistance of the clerk, supplies the place 
of the person who has had charge of the boys when out of the 
school-rooms. By this arrangement, one assistant is dispensed 
with, a competent superintendent of the schools secured, and 
the amount of salaries not increased. 

A reduction of $200 has also been made in the salary of 
Physician, making a total reduction of salaries, in all depart- 
ments, since the first of April, of over seventeen hundred dollars. 
The Inspectors contemplate further retrenchment in salaries 
when in their opinion it can be done without impairing the 
efficiency and usefulness of the institution. 

CONCLUDING REMARKS. 

Viewing pauperism as essentially a disease, the Inspectors 
have directed such treatment as in their judgment would 
prevent instead of encourage it. While they would exercise 
frugality in every department, they do not believe that true 
economy consists in starving mind or body, or treating with 
inhumanity and neglect the unfortunate inmates of a pauper 
establishment. By a course of discipline and education they 
believe the children may be saved from a life of vice and pau- 
perism. For the sick and infirm they would afford comfort and 
assistance ; for those in health constant employment. 

The idea of a workhouse for the adult portion has frequently 
been discussed, but we do not think it would be economical to 
erect one at present. The farm has thus far furnished employ- 
ment, at all seasons of the year, for those who have been able 
to labor. For female inmates, the sewing-room, cooking and 
laundry departments always furnish employment. 

It is thought that an appropriation of thirty-eight thousand 
dollars (138,000) will be sufficient to defray current expenses 
the coming year. No appropriation for improvements is asked. 
A small amount for furnishing force-pumps and hose would 
better secure the safety of the buildings ; but it is hoped that 
by employing efficient watchmen, and using proper precaution, 



8 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

an outbreak of fire may be prevented, and the fearful conse- 
quences of such an accident avoided. 

In closing, we take pleasure in acknowledging the co-opera- 
tion of the Superintendent in our plans and suggestions, and 
commend him for the earnestness and fidelity with which he 
has labored for the interests of the State. We also bear testi- 
mony to the faithful services of the Matron, and all subordinate 
officers, believing that they have discharged their respective 
duties in a manner creditable to themselves and the Common- 
wealth. 

GORDON M. FISK, 
SAMUEL BANISTER, 
GILBERT A. SMITH, 

Inspectors, 

State Almshouse, Monson, ) 
September 30, 1858. J 



1858.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse at Monson:- 



Gentlemen, — I present the following as the Fifth Annual 
Report of this institution. 

The number in the institution at the date of the last 

report, September 30, 1857, 638 

The number admitted since, including twenty-two born 

in the institution, ....... 2,300 



Whole number supported since the last report, 2,938 

Number discharged, deserted and indentured, . 2,271 
Died, . . . . . . . ' . 102 

Remaining October 1, 1858 :-— 
Men, ........ 55 

Women, ...... 

Boys under 15 # years of age, 

Girls, ...... 

Total, .... 



74 
279 
157 



565 



2,938 



Average number supported through the year, 823. Increase 
over last year of 179. 



arsons admitted this year were born in 




Massachusetts, ..... 


. 337 


Vermont, ...... 


34 


New Hampshire, ..... 


18 


Maine, 


21 


Connecticut, ...... 

2 


41 



10 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Rhode Island, 












19 


New York, 












91 


Other States, . 












33 


Ireland, . 












964 


England, 












. 340 


Scotland, 












147 


British Provinces, 












134 


Germany, 












56 


France, . 












12 


Other countries and at sea, 








22 


Unknown, 


• 










31 



2,300 

Towns and Counties in Massachusetts from which Paupers 
have been received during the year. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 


Northampton, .... 16 


Pittsfield, . . 13 


Hadley, . 






3 


Williamstown, 




1 


South Hadley, 






4 


Washington, . 




1 


Huntington, . 






3 


Lanesboro', 






1 


Belchertown, . 






4 


Dalton, . 






6 


Williamsburg, 






6 


Becket, . 






2 


Easthampton, . 






1 


Clarksburg, 






3 


Enfield, . 






3 


Sheffield, 






2 


Westhampton, 






4 


Cheshire, 






1 


— 


Adams, . 






3 


82 


Lee, 






6 


HAMPDEN COUNTY. 


Tyringham, 






4 


Chicopee, .... 102 


Windsor, 






1 


Holyoke, 






42 


Lenox, . 






1 


Palmer,* 






1,184 


45 


Chester, . 






1 


FRANKLIN COUNTY. 


Longmeadow, . 






1 


Greenfield, 


Springfield, 






88 


Deerfield, 






2 


Westfield, 






11 


Bernardston, . 






9 


West Springfield, . 






6 


Leyden, . 






7 


Wilbraham, . 






4 


Conway, . 






1 


Southwick, 






2 


— 


Monson, . 






55 


30 


Agawam, 






1 


HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 


Wales, . 






1 


Ware, ..... 22 


Ludlow, . 






2 


Worthington, . . . . 1 


Brimfield, 






5 


Whately, .... 2 




Amherst, . . . . 13 


1,505 



* Nearly all travelling paupers. 



1858.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29, 

Table — Continued. 



11 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 




Sutton, .... 


33 


Taunton, 


1 


Upton, . 
Barre, 






5 
1 


WORCESTER COUNTY. 




Hard wick, 






2 


Worcester, 


157 


Warren, . 






19 


StUrbridge, 








8 


Westborough, . 






3 


Leicester, 








7 


North Brookfield, 






8 


Brookfield, 
Milford, . 








8 
33 


West Boylston, 
Fitchburg, 






2 
4 


Webster, 








12 


Petersham, 






2 


Grafton, . 








39 


Holden, . 






10 


Oxford, . 








7 


Ashburnham, . 






5 


Uxbridge, 








13 




462 


Southbridge, 


# 






23 


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 


Dudley, . 








8 


Boston, 


26 


Millbury, 








34 






Paxton, . 








6 


Tewksbury Almshouse, . 


52 


Auburn, . 








5 


Transient, . 


80 


Northbridge, . 








3 


Born in the house, . 


22 



A good measure of health has been enjoyed in the institution 
during the greater portion of the year. In the months of 
December and January last, scarlet fever and measles prevailed 
quite generally among the children. Of these diseases there 
were some two hundred and fifty cases. The number of deaths 
during the year has been one hundred and two. For a more 
detailed account under this head, you are respectfully referred 
to the Physician's report. 

It has been my purpose, as far as possible, to keep constantly 
employed all such inmates as are able to work ; daily labor is 
of the highest importance to all the healthy adults ; habits of 
idleness will greatly encourage multitudes to apply for aid, and 
thereby increase the number of permanent paupers. Labor, 
therefore, of some kind must be strictly required of all the 
adults who are not sick and infirm. 

In the agricultural department, improvements are continually 
being made. The unproductive portions of the farm are being 
subdued and brought under cultivation as rapidly as circum- 
stances will permit. There can be but one sentiment, I think, 
in regard to this farm ; that with proper care and management, 
and a reasonable length of time, it will become very productive 



12 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



and do much towards supporting the inmates of the institution. 
The buildings generally, are in a good condition. There is great 
need, however, of having more labor and time bestowed upon 
the fences, especially upon those on the outskirts of the farm. 
The number of swine is quite large, and in my judgment a 
smaller number would be more profitable to the Common- 
wealth. An increase in the number of cows will soon become 
desirable ; the benefit of supplying the institution with milk 
from the farm, must be apparent to every one. 



85 

4 

6 

4 

800 

100 

600 

150 

350 

250 

50 

1,544 

8,000 
20 
7 
40 
10 
50 

8,759 

535 

447 

132 

1 

50 



PRODUCE OF THE FAKM. 




tons hay, at $10, ...... 


$850 00 


" corn stalks, at $5, .... 


20 00 


" pumpkins, at $1, . . . . ,, . 


6 00 


" squashes, at $15, ..... 


60 00 


bushels potatoes, at 25 cents, 


200 00 


" corn, at $1, . 


100 00 


" carrots, at 25 cents, .... 


150 00 


" onions, at 62 cents, .... 


93 00 


" beets, at 25 cents, .... 


87 50 


" turnips, at 25 cents, 


62 50 


" parsnips, at 25 cents, 


12 50 


gallons of milk, since June 1st 1858, at 




12J cents, ...... 


193 00 


heads cabbage, at 4 cents, .... 


320 00 


bushels peas, at $1.25, .... 


25 00 


" beans, at $1.25, .... 


8 75 


" cucumbers, at 25 cents, . 


10 00 


" tomatoes, at 25 cents, 


2 50 


" apples, at 25 cents, 


12 50 


lbs. pork, previous to June 1st, 1858, at 




10 cents, ....... 


875 90 


lbs. pork, since June 1st, at 10 cents, . 


53 50 


lbs. veal, previous to June 1st, at 10 cents, . 


44 70 


lbs. veal, since June 1st, at 10 cents, . 


13 20 


calf sold previous to June 1st, 


4 00 


swine sold previous to June 1st, . 


128 52 


swine sold since June 1st, .... 


141 43 



$3,474 50 



1858.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



13 



FARMING UTENSILS, &C. 






2 ox sleds, 


$18 00 


4 ox carts, 








280 00 


1 ox wagon, . 








90 00 


1 two horse wagon, 








90 00 


1 two horse top carriage, , 








150 00 


1 horse top carriage, . 








150 00 


1 horse buggy, . 








50 00 


1 horse buggy, . 








25 00 


4 double harnesses, 








38 00 


3 single harnesses, 








31 00 


1 double sleigh, . 








35 00 


1 single sleigh, . . , . 








10 00 


2 ox harrows, .... 








20 00 


5 stone drags, 








12 50 


6 set ox bows, . 








4 50 


11 ox yokes, 








34 00 


14 ox chains, shovels, hoes, forks, and rakes, 


106 00 


8 ploughs, 10 iron bars, 20 picks, axes and wedges 


135 00 


1 corn planter, 1 seed sower, and 1 cultivator, 


22 00 


3 feed cutters, . . 


41 00 


1 stump machine, ..... 


250 00 


1 set butcher's tools, and 1 set drilling tools, 


105 00 


1 doz. scythe snaths, wood and cross cut saws, 


21 00 


5 wheelbarrows, 


12 50 


8 buffalo robes, 


36 00 




$1,766 50 


STOCK ON THE FARM. 




8 oxen. 




1 bull. 


♦ 


10 cows. 




1 yearling heifer. 




3 spring calves. 




3 horses. 




34 hogs. 




32 pigs. 











14 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

Expenditures for bills from October 1, 1857, to June 1, 1858. 



id for dry goods, 






. $3,763 33 


flour, .... 






. 4,901 08 


milkj .... 






. 1,452 71 


boots and shoe stock, 






. 1,197 60 


potatoes, .... 






570 15 


grain, .... 






. 1,132 10 


beef and pork, 






. 5,380 49 


groceries and West India goods 


? 




. 1,871 58 


beans, .... 






191 15 


fuel and lights, 






732 74 


salt and fresh fish, . 






212 17 


crackers, .... 






105 30 


stoves and fixtures, . 






501 53 


butter and cheese, . 






345 61 


lime, cement and sand, . 






122 30 


railroad frieght, 






332 30 


express and telegraph company 






47 64 


postage, .... 






58 74 


soap and potash, 






298 63 


lumber, .... 






355 11 


furniture, .... 






225 62 


tin ware, .... 






60 83 


fruit and vegetables, 






97 34 


poultry, eggs and oysters, 






124 41 


medical supplies, 






390 08 


books, stationery and printing, 




254 45 


hardware and farming utensils, 




203 34 


hay and straw, 




147 26 


smith work, .... 






124 23 


brooms, mops and brushes, 






166 85 


crockery, ..... 






154 07 


paints and oils, 






49 05 


repairs, . 






206 71 


plumbing repairs, 






76 35 


transportation of paupers, 






1,762 64 


consultation fees, 






183 00 


stock, ..... 






602 00 


interest, 






60 00 



1858.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



15 



Paid for salaries and labor, 
sundries, . 



. $6,512 62 
634 25 



Cr. by cash for articles sold and surplus 

cash, $800 00 

Cr. by cash of State Treasurer, . . 34,807 36 



$35,607 36 



$35,607 36 



The above expenditures were made by my predecessor pre- 
vious to June 1, 1858. 

Expenditures for bills from June 1, 1858, to October 1, 1858. 



id for dry goods, ..... 


. $466 34 


flour, ...... 


1,193 63 


milk, . . . . .,- . 


912 65 


boots and shoes, .... 


126 26 


potatoes, 


57 42 


grain, ...... 


346 23 


beef and pork, .... 


524 31 


groceries and West India goods, 


345 06 


beans, ...... 


81 69 


fuel and lights, 


2,524 43 


salt and fresh fish, . 


81 44 


crackers, ....... 


24 33 


butter, 


39 33 


lime and cement, 


39 88 


railroad freight, 


14 31 


express and telegraph company, 


11 00 


postage, 


17 65 


soap and potash, . 


116 81 


furniture, . . . . . . 


43 00 


tin ware, 


6 43 


beef butchered from stock bought since 




June 1st, 


231 14 


fruit and vegetables, 


34 87 


poultry and eggs, 


9 97 


medical supplies, . . . . . 


109 94 


books and stationery, . f . 


41 37 


hay and straw, 


123 23 



16 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Paid for smith work, 

hardware and farming utensils, 

brooms, mops and brashes, 

crockery, .... 

paints and oils, 

repairs, .... 

plumbing repairs, 

transportation of paupers, 

salaries and labor, . 

straw hats, 

expenses, 

sundries, .... 

Cr. by cash for articles sold, 

of State Treasurer, . 



$284 26 
10,337 11 



$42 58 

33 69 

59 99 

3 00 

6 40 

70 33 
26 91 

176 78 

2,558 88 

15 00 

33 81 

71 28 

$10,621 37 



10,621 37 



Building account in October, 1857 : — 
Cash paid for stone, lumber and labor, . 
Cr. by cash received of State Treasurer, 



$256 40 
256 40 



Expenditures for quarter ending March 31, 1858, 

for which $11,000 were appropriated, are . . $13,208 15 
Less for surplus cash, ...... 600 00 

Total amount drawn from State Treasurer, $12,608 15 
Making $1,608.15 more than the appropriation. 



Expenditures for six months commencing April 

1, 1858, and ending September 30, 1858, are . $18,201 38 
Less by cash for things sold, ..... 284 26 



Cr. by cash received of State Treasurer, 



.$17,917 12 



Total expenditures for nine months commencing 
January 1, 1858, and ending September 30, 
1858, are . . $30,525 27 

Cr. by cash received of State Treasurer from 
January 1, 1858, to September 30, 1858, . . 30,525 27 



1858.] ' PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 17 

As there was no invoice of personal property and supplies 
taken and appraised at the commencement of the present 
financial year, and as there is no record of the time when, and 
the amount of moneys received and paid out, in consequence of 
the absence of the cash book, I am unable to show the exact 
cost per head of supporting the inmates at this institution 
during the past year. 

The schools, numbering three hundred and sixty-six pupils, 
with all the interruptions in schools of the character of these, 
have shown a good degree of improvement. 

About one hundred of this number are in the alpha- 
bet. Of the others, the great majority can read and spell 
more or less readily, write with pen and pencil, and are 
engaged in studying arithmetic and geography to the same 
extent as other children of the same age in our public 
schools. 

The children admitted here, as a general thing, are ignorant 
of the first rudiments of education, having known little or 
nothing of schools ; hence a considerable time is necessary for 
discipline and good training in order to form right habits 
suitable for study. 

With this preparatory discipline, I see no reason why these 
children may not compare favorably with those of a corres- 
ponding age in our common schools throughout the Common- 
wealth. A commendable desire on the part of all the teachers 
to advance and elevate the pupils, has been apparent to every 
observer. And it gives me pleasure to testify to their fidelity 
in every effort to promote the highest good of these poor 
unfortunates. 

Mr. Edgar M. Brown, a highly competent teacher, has the 
general charge of the schools and also of the boys while 
engaged in their sports and out-door exercises. Experienced 
female teachers are employed as assistants in the same work of 
benevolence. 

The moral condition of the institution is fully set forth in 
the Chaplain's report, to which I would respectfully refer 
you. 

3 



18 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

To each of you, gentlemen, who have always been ready to 
advise and assist me, and who have been active in promoting 
the best interests of this institution, I am glad of the oppor- 
tunity to express my obligations and my gratitude. 

Most respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 



JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jr. 



Monson State Almshouse, 
October 1, 1858. 



1858.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



19 



PHYSICIAN'S EEPOET 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, ]$Qnson :— 

Gentlemen, — The time lias arrived when it becomes my 
duty to present to you a statement of the condition of the 
medical department of this institution, for the year ending 
September 30, 1858. 

I have collected the following statistics from the hospital 
records, to show the class of patients admitted, and the influ- 
ence of age and season upon disease. 

The number remaining in the hospital, September 80, 



The number admitted during the year, 


1,032 


of births, 


22 


of deaths, 


102 


discharged, ...... 


972 


Present number in the hospital, 


67 


The number admitted under 5 years of age, 


349 


between 5 and 10 years of age, 


287 


10 and 15 years of age, . 


94 


15 and 30 years of age, 


184 


30 and 50 years of age, 


81 


over 50 years of age, . 


87 


The number admitted into the hospital in October, . 


90 


November, 


90 


December, 


143 


January, . 


150 


February, 


74 


March, 


91 


April, 


53 



20 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



The number admitted into the 


hospital in May, 


. 


51 




June, . 


78 




July, . 


84 




August, 


61 




September, . 


61 


The folloiving is a list of the different diseases treated 


F # 


Abscess, .... 


. 23 


Hepatitis, .... 


5 


Abscess, Mammary, . 


4 


Hip Disease, 






3 


Amenorrhea, . 


3 


Influenza, 






. 40 


Bronchitis, 


. 54 


Jaundice, . 






3 


Burns and Scalds, 


8 


Menorrhagia, 






9 


Croup, .... 


. 10 


Measles, . 






. 76 


Caries, .... 


5 


Marasmus, 






. 15 


Cholera Infantum, 


. 11 


Neuralgia, 






3 


Cancrum Oris, . 


. 13 


Opthalmia, 






. 61 


Cholera Morbus, 


7 


Orchitis, . 






4 


Congestion of Brain, 


3 


Pleurisy, . 






. 18 


Diarrhoea, 


. 25 


Pneumonia, 






. 31 


Dislocation of Elbow, 


1 


Parotitis, . 






. 25 


Hip, . . 


1 


Piles, 






4 


Shoulder, . 


2 


Parturition, 






24 


Dysentery, 


13 


Potts Disease, . 






1 


Dysmenorrhea, 


3 


Phthisis, . 






24 


Delirium Tremens, . 


4 


Paralysis, . 






9 


Epilepsy, .... 


3 


Peritonitis, 






8 


Erysipelas, 


14 


Bheumatism, 






11 


Enteritis, .... 


6 


Syphilis, Primary, 




4 


Fever, Intermittent, . 


14 


Secondary, 




6 


Typhoid 


15 


Scabes, 




80 


Simple, . 


11 


Scarlatina, 




165 


Fracture of Pubis, . 


1 


Scrofula, . 




4 


Tibia, . 


3 


Synovitis, 




3 


Clavicle, 


2 


Tinea Capitis, . 




39 


Bibs, 


2 


Tabes Mesenterica, . 




2 


Humerus, 


1 


Ulcer, 


-» . 


41 


Gonorrhoea, .... 


4 


Variola, . 




7 


Gastritis, 


2 


Varioloid, 




4 


Whooping Cough, . 


5 


Varicella, 




4 


Hydrocephalus, 


6 


Various diseases, 




27 



There have been during the year one hundred and two 
deaths. 



1858.] public document—no. 29. 

Causes of Death. 



21 



Anemia, ..... 1 


Hepatitis, 1 


Abscess, . 






1 


Jaundice, . 






1 


Bronchitis, 






1 


Laryngitis, 






1 


Cholera Infantum, 






4 


Marasmus, 






10 


Croup, 






2 


Measles, . 






1 


Cancer of Uterus, 






1 


Meningitis, 






2 


Chronic Diarrhoea, 






1 


Old Age, . 






4 


Cirrhosis, . 






1 


Pneumonia, 






5 


Dysentery, 






1 


Peritonitis, 






2 


Dentition, 






2 


Phthisis, . 






19 


Enteritis, . 






2 


Paralysis, . 






1 


Foundling, 






2 


Scarlatina, 






18 


Gastritis, . 






1 


Scrofula, . 






3 


Hydrocephalus, 






5 


Strangulated Hernia, 




1 


Hsematemesis, . 






1 


Typhoid Fever, 




3 


Hip Disease, 






2 


Tabes Mesenterica, . 




2 



The number of deaths under 5 years of age, . . 61 

between 5 and 10 years of age, 9 

10 and 15 years of age, 4 

15 and 30 years of age, 12 

30 and 50 years of age, 6 

over 50 years of age, . . 10 



The number of deaths in October, 

November, 

December, 

January, 

February, 

March, . 

April, . 

May, . 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 



1 
1 

23 
23 
11 
11 

5 
5 
7 
9 
4 
2 



As the foregoing statistics show, there has been a greater 
amount of sickness and mortality than during the previous 



22 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

year. This is owing in part to the crowded state of the insti- 
tution, but chiefly to the enfeebled condition to which many of 
the persons who became inmates, were reduced by the privation 
and exposure, previous to their admission, during the " hard 
times " of last winter. A large proportion of these persons 
were young children, many of whom had never experienced the 
diseases common to childhood. Being here brought directly in 
contact with these diseases, they very soon contracted them, 
and became inmates of the hospital. The scarlet fever prevailed 
extensively through the winter. It at first assumed a malig- 
nant form, but with the addition of one large room to the hos- 
pital accommodations, enabling us to classify the sick, and to 
remove the feeble and convalescent from those who were con- 
fined with acute disease, together with the strictest attention to 
ventilation, and to the diet of those, who from their feeble con- 
dition were predisposed to an attack, this alarming form of a 
terrible disease, was prevented from extending, and became 
more mild in its character, and more within the reach of 
remedial measures. 

The deaths were almost entirely confined to young chil- 
dren, — three years and under, — and to those who had been in 
the institution only a short time. Of the eighteen fatal cases, 
fourteen had been inmates of the house less than four weeks. 
The prevalence of the measles at the same time with the scarlet 
fever, in many instances following closely upon it, in others but 
just preceding it, frequently rendered cases otherwise simple, 
complicated, and often left the patient with some local disease 
of a serious nature. More than one-fourth the number of deaths 
were occasioned by tuberculous disease. This mortality might 
be considered large in proportion to the number of cases treated ; 
but it must be remembered, that in an institution of this kind 
it is impossible to give the sick that change of air, exercise, and 
diet, which is necessary to a successful treatment of this form 
of disease. 

The inmates, a large proportion of whom are children, were 
never in a more healthful condition than now. There have 
been but few cases of the usual diseases of summer and early 
autumn. Ophthalmia, that pest of an almshouse, has almost 
entirely disappeared. It is very seldom that a case now occurs 
among the children, except it be from accident, or a recent 



1858.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 23 

admission. The immunity which has existed the past year 
from diptheritic disease, to which there is a strong tendency 
among almshouse children, is one among other evidences of the 
sound condition of those who have been here for any length of 
time. This freedom from almshouse disease, is no doubt the 
result of the care which has been taken to furnish the inmates 
with good, fresh food at all seasons of the year, and of the 
attention paid to their clothing, cleanliness, and habits. The 
removal of the male hospital from the main building, beside 
furnishing better accommodations, has no doubt contributed to 
the general health of the institution. 

I desire to acknowledge my indebtedness to Dr. S. D. 
Brooks, the former able and efficient Superintendent, to whom 
much credit is due for the prosperity enjoyed by this depart 
ment. 

It gives me pleasure also to acknowledge the valuable service > 
rendered by Mrs. Harriet A. Hall, nurse. • 

In conclusion, allow me to express to you, gentlemen, and t * 
Dr. J. M. Brewster, Jr., the Superintendent of this institution, 
my thanks for kindness shown me. 

JOSEPH W. HASTINGS, 

Physician. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
September 30, 1858. 



24 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse , at Monson : — 

Gentlemen, — My services, the past year, have in general been 
similar to what they were in previous years. 

On week-day evenings I have conducted worship in the chapel, 
as formerly. I have visited the sick, when it has appeared that 
my ministrations might be likely to benefit them ; and have 
attended funerals, when called upon to do so. I have supplied 
preaching every Sabbath morning but one during the year. 
The officers of the institution, and those of the inmates who 
have been able, have very generally attended upon preaching. 
The assembly has usually appeared serious, and frequently quite 
solemn. Our congregation was considerably larger during the 
winter season than it had been at any former period, the num- 
ber in the institution being greater. On Sabbath afternoons, I 
have assisted in the Sabbath school, which has been large and 
interesting. 

During the last half of the year, I have attended a meeting 
weekly on Friday evenings, in addition to the usual chapel 
services. This meeting has been held, in consequence of an 
increased disposition in those connected with the institution, to 
attend to the subject of religion. In the month of March, some 
began to manifest unusual seriousness. Since that time, about 
ten of the officers, and not less than twenty of the inmates, are 
thought to have experienced the renewing grace of God. Most 
of the inmates who appear to have been converted are children 
of the Sabbath school. A large proportion of the older children 
have evidently had a deep sense of the importance of religion. 
Religious books belonging to the library have been read by them 



1858.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 25 

more than ever before. Profaneness and other immoralities 
have not often been witnessed in any of the children. 

A much beloved officer of the institution, and three or four 
inmates who have died during the year, manifested eminent 
piety. They expressed ardent desires for the salvation of souls ; 
and no doubt, spiritual blessings have been granted in answer 
to their prayers. 

I do not know that any cases of conversion have occurred 
very recently ; but those who have expressed hope in Christ, 
continue in general to give pleasing evidence that their hopes 
are well founded. 

I am happy to acknowledge that I have received important 
assistance from the former and the present Superintendent, and 
other officers of the institution ; and also from some neighbor- 
ing clergymen, especially from the Rev. Dr. Vaill, of Palmer, 
who has frequently been present at our evening meetings. 

I can truly say, that I have experienced much pleasure in 
officiating here ; and I hope it will appear hereafter, that 
my labors, though very imperfect, have not been altogether in 
vain. 

Wishing, gentlemen, that the Divine blessing may rest on 
you and on the institution of which you are the Inspectors, I 
remain very respectfully yours, 

EBENEZER B. WRIGHT, Chaplain. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
September, 1858. 



■"' ~~} 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 29. 

SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



IN SPECTORS 



STATE ALMSHOUSE 



AT MONSON, 



OCTOBER, 1859. 



BOSTON: 

WILLIAM WHITE, PKINTER TO THE STATE, 

1859. 



€otnmomucnltl) of Massachusetts. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

The management of the almshouse under our inspection, 
during the past financial year, has been similar to that of the 
year previous. It has been the aim of both Superintendent 
and Inspectors, to adopt any measure for the improvement of 
inmates and the advantage of the Commonwealth, that expe- 
rience or necessity might suggest. 

At the close of the year, ending September 80, 1858, 

the number of inmates in the almshouse was . . 565 

Number admitted and born since September 30, 1858, . 1,378 
Discharged, indentured, deserted, and died during the 

year, 1,448 

Remaining September 30, 1859, . ... . 495 
Average number supported during the year, . . . 581 
Decrease from the average number supported the pre- 
vious year, . . . . ... . 242 

Of the number admitted, one hundred and sixty were received 
from the Bridgewater and Tewksbury almshouses. Three 
hundred and seventy-eight of the present number are children. 
The male adults are either too old to labor, or are incapacitated 
by disease. The services of the whole number have not been 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

equal to the labor of three good men. The female adults have 
been more useful, most of them having assisted in the several 
departments of in-door labor. The majority of this class have 
been forced into the almshouse with from one to four children, 
by the desertion or death of their husbands. They could very 
well support themselves, but are unable to provide for their 
offspring, and to avoid a separation accompany them to the 
almshouse. Here they remain till their children are inden- 
tured, or till some fortunate circumstance opens a way for their 
maintenance unassisted by the State. Several mothers in this 
situation have been furnished with employment for themselves 
and their children, in manufacturing villages during the past 
year. 

There is another class, who, from a course of criminality, 
have been obliged to seek the almshouse as a lying-in hospital, 
or as a home for themselves and illegitimate children. We are 
aware that this is an increasing evil, yet we can see no way by 
which it can be avoided. At least a dozen unfortunate young 
women of this class have been admitted during the year. In 
several instances the authors of their disgrace have been found 
and compelled to provide for their support. 

CHILDREN AND SCHOOLS. 

The large number of children in this institution renders it 
necessary to maintain suitable schools for their instruction. 
Four teachers are employed — -one male and three females— who 
are earnest in their efforts to instruct and discipline their pupils. 
The schools are kept six hours each day — with two intermissions 
of thirty minutes each — excepting the afternoons of Wednesday 
and Saturday of every week, which are occupied in bathing, 
and changing clothing. 

The accumulation of idiotic and deformed children, with 
those suffering from hereditary diseases, presents a gloomy 
feature among the juvenile inmates. They are repulsive in 
appearance, and their association with other children cannot 
but exert a pernicious influence. Some of the demented might 
receive benefit by attending the idiotic school ; for others there 
is no hope of improvement. If these unsightly beings, in the 
several almshouses, were placed in one institution, removed 
from the view of other inmates, the effect would be salutary. 



1859.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 5 

The number of children indentured during the year, and 
now out on trial, is 139 — a larger number than has been simi- 
larly disposed of in any previous year. The children are 
usually happy and contented, and the yearly reports received 
from their guardians are generally of a most encouraging 
character. 

HEALTH OF INMATES. 

A remarkable degree of health has been enjoyed by inmates. 
The number of deaths during the year has only reached 45 — a 
smaller number than has been reported in any previous year. 
No epidemic has visited the institution, and the cause of death 
in most cases was from diseases incurable from the first. 

It is not unfrequently the case that towns convey paupers to 
the almshouse when in a dying condition, with the evident 
intention of avoiding the expense of burying them. Under the 
present statutes they claim a right to do so ; but the practice is 
inhuman and should be prevented by legislation. 

Dr. J. W. Hastings, resigned his position as Physician last 
October, and Dr. G. M. Nichols, of Palmer, was appointed in 
his place. The report of Dr. Nichols will exhibit full par- 
ticulars concerning the hospitals. 

MORAL CONDITION. 

The inmates are usually decorous, manifesting proper regard 
for the rules and regulations of the institution. All in health 
attend religious services on the Sabbath, and prayers every 
evening. 

Rev. E. B. Wright, who had officiated as Chaplain for five 
years, resigned last January. His place was filled by Rev. A. 
D. Bullock, pastor of the Second Baptist Church in Palmer, 
but failing health obliged him to resign in June last. Rev. 
John A. Yinton, of Boston, was then appointed Chaplain, and 
his report will be found attached to our own. 

THE FARM. 

The process of improving the farm still goes on. During the 
past year seven or eight acres have been cleared and fitted for 
pasturage. Wet soil has been drained, and considerable stone 
wall built where wood fences had become decayed. The yield 



6 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

of crops in field and garden lias been good. Dry weather some- 
what affected the rowen crop, which is not so large as that of 
last year. There is yet much to be accomplished in the way of 
removing stumps and stones from the soil, draining and sub- 
duing new land, before all portions of the farm will be brought 
into a suitable state of cultivation. The work of improving 
may be carried on from year to year, principally by inmate 
labor. 

Mr. George Fisherdick, for several years the Farmer, resigned 
in the autumn of 1858, and George Lee, a practical farmer of 
Becket, was appointed in his place. 

PROTECTION FROM FIRE. 

The inflammable materials of which the almshouse buildings 
are composed, and the danger to life which a conflagration 
would occasion, have been remarked by almost every visitor. 
To guard against a disaster of this nature an appropriation of 
one thousand dollars was made to each almshouse by the legis- 
lature last winter. With the amount allotted to this institution 
the Inspectors have purchased three never-failing springs of 
water, ninety-two rods south of the almshouse, and are now 
erecting a reservoir and putting in pipe to bring water to the 
rear of the buildings. Thence it may be taken through 
hydrants and hose to any part of the premises. The reservoir 
is at an elevation seventy feet above the cupola of the alms- 
house, and is capable of holding forty thousand gallons. The 
Commonwealth has the right to enlarge the reservoir to what- 
ever capacity may hereafter be needed without additional 
expense for land. The pipe bringing the water is made of 
cement and iron, having a bore six inches in diameter one- 
third of the way, the remainder being four inches in diameter. 



$100 00 



The cost of the springs, including land damages for 
reservoir, was ....... 

Expense of constructing reservoir and digging pipe- 
ditch, 

Cost of water-pipe and laying, .... 

Estimated expense of over 500 feet of leather hose, 
hydrants and fixtures, ..... 

Making the cost, as at present estimated, . $1,921 00 



455 


00 


846 


00 


520 


00 



1859.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 7 

This amount exceeds the appropriation by nine hundred and 
twenty-one dollars, but in consequence of the great exposure 
of the buildings to fire, and the precaution suggested by the 
burning of other charitable institutions, the Inspectors have 
felt justified in making this outlay, confident that the next 
legislature will approve of their action and grant an appro- 
priation sufficient to defray the expense incurred. 

The almshouse, has hitherto been furnished with water from 
an open brook and wells, the former sometimes being impure 
and unfit for drink, or cooking purposes. The supply from the 
new source will be sufficient, and pure at all seasons. 

APPROPRIATION NEEDED. 

In 1857 the Inspectors leased of Rufus F. Fay about two 
acres of land for a play yard for the children, with the privi- 
lege of purchasing the same at the expiration of the lease, for 
one hundred dollars per acre. The land is a triangular piece 
which should belong to the State, if for no other reason than 
to give symmetry to the boundary line between the Common- 
wealth's land and that of Mr. Fay. The same is needed for 
play grounds, and if not purchased at the expiration of the 
lease next May, we believe that it cannot be obtained at any 
future time on so favorable terms. 

The steam boiler now used, is insufficient for the wants of 
the institution. It has become much worn from constant use, 
and the engineer informs us that if the present demand upon 
it should be continued, a new one will be needed in two or 
three years. It sometimes happens that cooking and washing 
in the inmate department are suspended for a day or two to 
allow of repairs upon the boiler. If another boiler should be 
added, this evil would be remedied, and with sufficient pipe the 
buildings could be warmed by steam, thereby securing greater 
uniformity of temperature in cold weather, and less danger 
from fire. 

INVENTORY. 

In obedience to an Act passed by the legislature last winter, 
the Inspectors have taken an inventory of the stock, produce, 
goods, and all other articles on hand and owned by the Com- 
monwealth, September 30, 1859, which they present as follows : 



8 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Live stock on the farm, $2,466 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, .... 2,810 25 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . 2,147 27 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . 2,452 00 

Beds and bedding in the inmates' department, . 6,556 00 

Other furniture in the inmates' department, . . 2,914 52 

Personal property in the Sup'ts department, . 3,141 95 

Ready made clothing, ...... 2,480 17 

Dry goods, 709 47 

Provisions and groceries, ..... 1,000 78 

Drugs and medicines, ...... 704 18 

Fuel, 2,424 27 

Library, 354 56 

130,161 42 

officers' salaries. 

John M. Brewster, Jr., Superintendent, . . $1,200 00 

John A. Vinton, Chaplain, 400 00 

G. M. Nichols, Physician, 600 00 

Mrs. C. S. Brewster, Matron, . . . . 300 00 

Mrs. H. C. Nichols, 1st AssH Matron, . 156 00 

Sarah Dewey, 2d AssH Matron, . . . . 156 00 

Elizabeth A. Reid ; Nurse, 208 00 

Mrs. E. S. Norton, Seamstress, .... 182 00 

E. N. Montague, Teacher and charge of boys, . 250 00 

Maggie E. Hills, Teacher, 156 00 

Marietta Hannum, Teacher, . . . . 156 00 

Mary E. Kingsley, Teacher, 156 00 

William Spear and wife, Cooks in inmates' dept., . 575 00 

Mrs. Lucina Wansor, Cook in Supfs department, . 156 00 

W. J. Clark, charge of male department, . . 300 00 

W. L. Dunlap, Engineer, . . . . . 480 00 

Charles Gates, Baker, 276 00 

George Lee, Farmer, ....... 250 00 

Bela B. Tiffany, AssH Farmer, . . . . 200 00 

Ansel Millard, Teamster, 216 00 

Gilbert Clark, Washer, 168 00 

J. H. Brewster, Clerk, 400 00 



6,941 00 



1859.J PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 9 

INSPECTOKS. 

Gordon M. Fisk, $100 00 

Samuel Banister, 100 00 

Gilbert A. Smith, 100 00 



$300 00 

CONCLUSION. 

The Superintendent's report, annexed, sets forth particulars 
concerning the management of the almshouse, more minutely 
than our own. 

The present system of supporting paupers has been so elabo- 
rately discussed, and with so little benefit, that it may be sup- 
posed there is but one side to the question, and that a gloomy 
one. The testimony of our experience is that the almshouses 
are working a gradual cure for pauperism. They are no longer 
doubtful experiments, but practical charities, which reflect 
credit upon the benevolent character of the Commonwealth. 
They have faults and evils which time and experience only can 
remedy ; they have also merits which commend them to public 
favor and Christian philanthropy. 

Should no financial embarrassment occur to the country, we 
have reason to hope that the decrease in the number of inmates 
will in a few years be such that the annual current expenses of 
this institution will not exceed twenty-five thousand dollars. 

We again commend the Superintendent and all subordinate 
officers for their faithfulness and fidelity in the discharge of 
their respective duties. 

GORDON M. FISK, 
SAMUEL BANISTER, 
GILBERT A. SMITH, 

Inspectors. 

State Almshouse, Monson, Sept. 30, 1859. 

2 



10 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almhouse at Monson : 

Gentlemen, — Being brought to the close of another financial 
year, I present for your inspection the sixth annual report of 
this institution. 

The number in the institution at the date of the last 
report, October 1, 1858, 565 

The number admitted since, including nineteen born in 

the institution, 1,378 



Whole number supported since last report, . . 1,943 
Number discharged, deserted, and indentured, . 1,403 



died, 


. 


45 


Remaining October 1, 1859 : 


* 




Men, 


. 49 




Women, . 


. 68 




Boys under 15 years of age, 


. 237 




Girls, " " " . 


. 141 




Total, 


. 


495 

1,943 



Average number supported through the year, 581. 
Fifty-nine paupers sent out of the State. 

Persons admitted this year were born in 

Massachusetts, 308 

Maine, 17 

New Hampshire, 9 

Yermont, 9 



1859.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



11 



Connecticut, . 












23 


Khode Island, 












8 


New York, 












63 


Other States, . 












34 


Ireland, 












551 


England, 












156 


Germany, 












38 


Scotland, 












61 


British Provinces, 












38 


France, 












6 


Other countries and at sea, 








26 


Unknown, 












29 



1,378 

Towns and Counties in Massachusetts from which Paupers 
have been received during the year. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 




HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 


Adams, .... 


2 


Amherst, .... 2 


Becket, .... 


2 


Belchertown, 








4 


Cheshire, . . 


2 


Chesterfield, . 








1 


Florida, 


1 


Easthampton, 








3 


Great Barrington, . 


3 


Greenwich, 








1 


Hinsdale, 


1 


Hatfield, 








1 


Lenox, . . . 


1 


Middlefield, 








1 


Lee, .... 


4 


Northampton, 






5 


Mount Washington, 


5 


South Hadley, 






4 


Pittsfield, 


9 


Ware, 






13 


Stockbridge, . 


4 


Westhampton, 






5 


Tyringham, . 


3 


Worthington, . 






1 


West Stockbridge, . 


1 


— 


Washington, . 


5 


41 


Williamstown, 


9 


HAMPDEN COUNTY. 




— 


Blandford, .... 3 




52 


Brimfield, 








4 


FRANKLIN COUNTY. 




Chicopee, 








34 


Bernardston, . 


1 


Holyoke, 








12 


Deerfield, 


3 


Holland, 








1 


Greenfield, 


8 


Longmeadow, 








4 


Shelburne, 


1 
13 


Ludlow, . 
Monson, . 
Palmer* 








4 

11 

633 



* Nearly all travelling paupers. 



12 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 

Table — Continued. 



[Oct. 



Southwick, .... 1 


Southbridge, .... 1 


Springfield, 
Wilbraliam, . 






56 
5 


Sutton, . 
Sturbridge, 






1 
5 


Westfield, 






5 


Uxbridge, 






2 


West Springfield, 
Russell, . 






4 

1 

778 


Worcester, 
West Brookfield, 
Warren, 
Webster, 






35 

4 
8 
1 


WORCESTER COU 

Barre, . 


NTT. 

2 


West Boylston, 
Westborough, 






1 
3 


Charlton, 






1 


Athol, . 






1 


Dudley, . 
Fitcliburg, 
Gardner, 






1 


1 


97 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 


Hardwick, 






2 


Boston, 


Holden, . 
Harvard, 
Milford, . 






1 

1 
5 


Tewksbury State Almshouse, 
Bridge water " 


104 
69 


Millbury, 






9 


Rainsford Island, . 


3 


North Brookfield, 
Oxford, . 






1 

1 


Northampton Insane Hospital, 
Transient, 


2 
192 


Spencer, 






1 


Born in the house, . 


19 



Of the number received, 189 come into the State the present 
year ; and of the 1,378 received during the year, all but about 
100 are of foreign birth and parentage. 

Expenditures from October 1, 1858, to October 1, 1859 : 



Paid for dry goods, 


. 


$2,287 22 


flour, 


. 


4,400 87 


milk, 


. 


2,856 31 


beef and pork, 


. . . 


1,633 84 


fish, 


. . . 


165 91 


fuel and lights, 


• • . . 


2,644 72 


tin and wooden ware, 


. 


149 29 


books, stationery and 


printing, 


113 03 


fruit and vegetables, 


* 


122 52 


straw, 


... 


135 64 


groceries and West India goods, 


2,158 78 






ILIC DOCUMENT— No _ 



Paid for medical supplies, 






_ 13 


paints and oil. 




. 


railroad freight. 




1 24 


express and telegraph compani 




" 04 


hardware and farm: 




. 


be d leather, 




1 18 41 


mi and brooms, 






158 


furniture, 






44 64 


lumber, .... 






121 78 


poultry and egg-, . 






. 


blacksmithi 






1 1 71 


lime, cement, and sand. 






11- 10 


_ tin, .... 






1 72 


potato ... 






5 41 


beans, .... 






244 Bl 


pos( _ . 






.54 63 


beef cattle and other stock, 






3.179 74 


soap and potas 






: 20 


crockery, 






144 M 


crack*. 






73 94 


• ves and fixture-. 






. 


powder. .... 






9 W 


straw hats. 






65 25 


labor of sundry person 






140 72 


repairs. .... 






. 


plumbing repairs, . 






50 26 


permanent improvements. 






13. 82 


transportation of paupers. 






26C :. 


expenses. 






25" : : 


consultation fee^, , 






24 :: 


salaries 






7.126 43 


sundries. 






m ;: 




$32,820 60 


Inspectors' salaries. 


expenses. 


289 48 


833,410 )8 



14 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

Cr. by cash of the alien commissioners, 
per John G. Locke, Esq., for the sup- 
port of paupers from Boston and 

Paxton, $ 62 84 

Cr. by cash of several towns and indi- 
viduals for the support of paupers, . 80 00 
Cr. by cash for articles sold, . . 462 00 
" " of State Treasurer, . . 32,805 24 

$33,410 08 



$64.73 of the expenditures ^are for bills made 
previous to June 1, 1858. 

Total expenditures for the year ending September 



30, 1859, are 


. $33,410 08 


From this deduct — 




Bills of former year, .... 


$64 73 


Transportation of paupers, . 
Permanent improvements and repairs, . 
Lime, cement, and sand, 


260 32 
829 27 
118 10 

1 070 AO 




_L,^J 1 J-i tt-— 


Total amount of running expenses, 


.$32,137 66 


The amount of expenditures for nine months, com- 


mencing January 1, 1859, and ending September 

30, 1859, are $22,932 54 

Inspectors' salaries, 225 00 

" expenses, . . . . 240 83 



$23,398 37 

Cr. by cash of Alien Commissioners, per 
J. G. Locke, Esq., for support of 
paupers, . . . . . . $62 84 

Cr. by cash of several towns and indi- 
viduals for the support of paupers, . 80 00 
Cr. by cash for articles sold, . . 462 00 
" " of State Treasurer, . . 22,793 53 

$23,398 37 



1859.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



15 



The amount of supplies, furnishing goods, mechan- 
ical machinery, farming utensils, stock, &c, on 



hand as per invoice of June 1, 1858, ; 


ire . . $28,085 10 


Total amount of cash received of State Treasurer, 


from June 1, 1858, to September 30, 1859, . 45,127 92 




$73,213 02 


From this amount should be deducted 


as per in- 


voice, September 30, 1859 — 




Live stock on the farm, 


$2,466 00 


Produce of the farm on hand, 


2,810 25 


Carriages and agricultural implements, 


2,147 27 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 


2,452 00 


Beds and bedding in the inmates' depart- 




ment, ...... 


6,556 00 


Other furniture in the inmates' depart- 




ment, 


2,914 52 


Personal property in the Superintend- 




ent's department, .... 


3,141 95 


Keady made clothing, . . 


2,480 17 


Dry goods, 


709 47 


Provisions and groceries, 


1,000 78 


Drugs and medicines, .... 


704 18 


Fuel, 


2,424 27 


Library, 


354 56 


For transportation of paupers, 16 mos., 


437 10 


For permanent improvements and repairs, 




16 months, ..... 


926 51 


For consultation fees, .... 


24 60 


Cash on hand, 


519 04 



$32,068 67 



Making the net sum for the support of inmates, . $41,144 35 
being $65.42 for each pauper 16 months, or 95 
cents per week, 

ESTIMATED PRODUCE OP THE FARM. 

3 hogs sold, $39 50 

4 pigs sold, 9 50 

2 calves sold, 27 00 

8,015 pounds pork, at 10 cents, .... 801 50 



16 



2/785 
1,027 

81 



6,000 

700 

1,100 

366 

31 

10 

203 

150 

332 

17 

5 

45 

2,9861 

4.910 



ALMSHOUSE AT MOXSOX 



pounds beef, at 8 J cents, 

pounds veal, at 10 cents, 

tons hay, at 812, . 
" straw, at 86.50, . 
" corn fodder, at 8S, 
" squashes, at 815, . 

heads cabbage, at 4 cents, . 

bushels rye, at 81. 

" potatoes, at 50 cents, 
" carrots, at 25 cents, 
" onions, at 75 cents, . 
" cucumbers, at 25 cents, 
" tomatoes, at 25 cents, 
", beets, at 25 cents, . 
" parsnips, at 25 cents, 
" turnips-, at 25 cents, 
" peas, at 81.25, 
" beans, at 81.25, 
" apples, at 50 cents, . 

gallons milk, at 12^ cents, . 



., " sweet,' 



at J ce 



it, 



[Oct. 



8236 


72 


102 


70 


972 


00 


13 


00 


40 


00 


45 


00 


240 


00 


33 


50 


350 


00 


350 00 


274 50 


7 75 


2 50 


50 


75 


017 

01 


50 


83 


00 


21 


25 


6 


25 


22 


50 


373 


31 


36 


83 


84,176 


56 



The farm is being gradually improved, and annually increas- 
ing in productiveness. Underdraining has been carried on to 
a considerable extent during the year, and I propose to con- 
tinue the same to a still greater degree in the year to come. I 
fear that the farmers of Massachusetts do not fully understand 
and appreciate the benefits of this particular mode of augment- 
ing the value of their lands. It should receive the attention of 
every intelligent cultivator of the soil. 

To save and apply judiciously our liquid manure, has been a 
subject of much thought and study. The maturity of vege- 
tables is materially hastened, as well as increased in quantity, by 
being highly manured. Hence the value I attach to the saving 
of all our natural home manures. The more fertility, the 
earlier and better the crops. The products of the farm, as 
will be seen by the preceding estimates, have been highly satis- 
factory. 



1859.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 17 

The schools, during the year, have been quite prosperous. 
Their numbers have averaged three hundred and forty. Some 
of these pupils appear remarkably well, and would honor any 
of our private or select schools. Mr. Edwin N. Montague, and 
Misses Hills, Haimum and Kingsley, are employed as teachers ; 
the former having the general charge of the schools, and also 
of the boys in all their sports and pleasures. It is well and 
fitting that the State should make this ample provision for the 
intellectual and moral wants of these unfortunate children. 
The education of the head and heart, a correction of the habits 
and purposes, and the giving of right impressions in regard to 
the common duties of life, have been most diligently taught. 
Earnestness and fidelity, on the part of teachers, have con- 
tributed largely to their success. I take great pleasure in 
commending them for the proper discharge of their responsible 
duties. 

I desire, in this connection, to acknowledge the able and 
efficient services of Mr. Edgar M. Brown, and Misses Colton, 
Clarke and Trask, who were teachers for several months during 
the year. 

The health of the institution has been as good as could 
reasonably be expected. The number of deaths has been forty- 
five. For particulars under this head, I would refer you to the 
doctor's report. 

The religious interests of the institution, for the first eight 
months of the year, were under the guidance of the Rev. 
Messrs. Wright and Bullock. Their ministrations were highly 
valued, and will be found, it is hoped, to have been the means 
of doing much good in correcting the lives and purifying the 
hearts of those who received them. The chaplaincy, for the 
balance of the year, has been filled by the Rev. John A. Vinton, 
of Boston. To his report I would respectfully refer you. 

As the present system of supporting State paupers is so well 
known, it would seem wholly unnecessary that I should devote 
a single moment to an exposition of a policy with which your 
Board is already perfectly familiar. I must say, however, that 
in my judgment, the real value and importance of these State 
3 



18 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct, 

charities can hardly be overestimated. Hundreds of children, 
taken annually from the temptations of vice and crime, are 
embraced within the fostering arms of the State, and taught to 
be industrious, honest, truthful, virtuous and happy, and edu- 
cated to feel that they must be something and do something, 
and thereby prepared to become respectable members of society. 
There have been put out on trial and indentured, the past 
year, more than one hundred children. 

The present mode of warming the house is expensive, unsafe? 
and inconvenient. It would be a very great improvement to 
have the building heated by steam. As we now are, with only 
one small boiler for cooking and washing, there is often great 
delay, and sometimes an entire suspension of steam power for 
a day or more, in order to make repairs, thereby disturbing the 
culinary department of the establishment to our great disad- 
vantage. The means of generating more steam are greatly 
needed. 

I wish to express my obligations to the Alien Commissioners 
for their interest in the institution, and for the assistance and 
kind attentions which they have given me. 

To all the officers who have been connected with me in the 
management of the institution, much praise is due for the 
faithfulness and efficiency with which they have discharged 
their respective duties. 

I close my report, gentlemen, with a lively sense of its 
deficiencies in doing justice to so noble a charity as has beeii 
committed to my hands, but with strong faith in this system, 
and with still stronger faith in the blessings of heaven, I have 
the honor to submit these pages, thanking you for the kindness 
and counsel with which you have been pleased to favor me. 

JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jb., Superintendent. 
Monson State Almshouse. Oct. 1, 1859. 



1859.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 19 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — -The medical department of this institution, for 
the current year, presents little that is new. Such facts as my 
records furnish, together with any suggestions relative to this 
department, are embodied in the following, as the sixth annual 
report, and is respectfully submitted. 

Considering the nature of our inmates, the institution has 
enjoyed a fair degree of health. The average number of inmates 
for the current year has been less than the preceding year. 
Such of the adults as were capable of earning a support, were 
early discharged, leaving behind a class with broken down 
constitutions and chronic diseases, unfit for but little service 
and requiring considerable medical attendance. The children, 
constituting full two-thirds of our number, have been subjected 
to epidemics and contagious diseases, many of whom found a 
place on the sick list. During some of the winter and spring 
months, influenza, whooping cough and chicken pox prevailed 
quite extensively. In the main, recovery resulted without 
serious consequences ; few suffered from pneumonia as the 
sequel of the first two named diseases. At the present time 
measles are prevailing ; otherwise our children are, generally, 
in the enjoyment of health. Of the acute diseases originating 
here, few cases have terminated fatally. 

The percentage of mortality, based upon the amount of sick- 
ness, and the number of inmates, as well as the whole number 
of deaths, has been smaller than in any other year since the 
institution was opened. Most of the deaths, as will be seen by 
reference to table No. 1, have been the result of fatal forms of 
disease. 

I desire to call your attention to an evil, and an evil, as it 
seems to me to be, of no small importance ; I refer to the act 



20 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

of the overseers of the poor of towns and cities sending to our 
State almshouses moribund cases. The allusion to this subject 
is nothing new. Others in a similar position of myself have here- 
tofore called attention to this evil, giving, at the same time, a 
decided expression against such an inhuman practice. Persons 
are sent here actually dying, past any reasonable hope of their 
living but a few hours, at the most, when their removal is a source 
of great suffering, and the cause of an earlier dissolution. This 
is not all. Patients are sometimes sent us in the midst of an 
acute disease ; soon after reaching here, die, when, if they had 
been left to quiet and decent care, might have, in all probability, 
recovered. To show the evil in its proper light, I will take one? 
among other cases, as an illustration. Last February a man 
was sent to this institution from a town nearly one hundred 
miles distant, subject to exposure and the changes of convey- 
ance, when soul and body were about separating. At the time 
he left his home, he was suffering from a very serious difficulty, 
involving the pleura, lungs and heart, of a sub-acute character. 
Doubts, I understand, were expressed before starting, as to 
whether this suffering man could survive the journey, such 
being the severity of his disease.* It must have been evident 
to the common observer that the patient was in a dying state 
before leaving his home. 

Now to cart around the poor under the circumstances alluded 
to, simply to save expense falling upon an individual town or 
place, is an act, worthy not of the man of heart or soul, and 
certainly unbecoming to the charity of our Commonwealth. 

Synopsis of the annexed tables, presenting some of the principal 

facts, with additional statements. 
Whole number of patients in, and admitted to the hospital 

during the year, 703 

Births during the year, . . . , . .19 

Discharged during the year, 596 

Deaths during the year, ....... 45 

Percentage of deaths on the whole number of patients, . 6.40 
Percentage of deaths on the whole number of inmates, . 2.25 
Number remaining in the hospital September 30, . . 62 

* Less than ten hours after being received here he died. Post mortem 
examination followed. 



1859.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 21 

The details of this report are arranged under the annexed 
tables, which see. 

Table No. 1 shows the causes of death, the whole number, 
the sex, the number for each month, and the ages of those who 
have died in the State almshouse, Monson, for the same time. 

Table No. 2 shows the number of cases of sickness, the names 
of the principal diseases, the sex, the numbers for each month, 
and the ages of the patients in the State almshouse, Monson, 
from October 1, 1858, to September 30, 1859. 

I would cordially acknowledge the valuable services rendered 
by Dr. William Workman, consulting physician. Also much 
is due Miss Reid, the nurse, for her efficiency and kindness in 
her department. And gentlemen, permit me, before closing 
this my first report, to express my sincere thanks to you for 
kindness and favors received. May this institution continue to 
receive your very efficient and valuable services. 

G. M. NICHOLS, Physician, 
State Almshouse, Monson, Oct, 1, 1.859. 



22 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



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1 rH I | I I I rH | | I 


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rH 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•-fpijp 


1 CM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 < 1 1 1 1 CO 1 1 .1 1 1 


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i 1 1 I rH 1 I rH rH 1 ! 


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1 TJH I rH 1 1 1 1 rH 1 1 


■OIBJIJE 


rHGOrH | rH CM rH CO rH rH rH 


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rHCMrHrHrHCMrHCOCMrHrH 

rH 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 


Bronchitis, .... 
Consumption, .... 

Cyanosis, 

Congestion of Lungs, 

Dentition, 

Debility, 

Fit, . . . . . . 

Heart, Disease of, 
Hydrocephalus, 

Hepatitis, 

Hemorrhage, .... 



1859.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29, 



23 



! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r-i 


CM 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CM 


i i i i I I i' i • r r i 1 ih 


1 1 i 1 1 1 I 1 1 i ! 


>o 


1 1 1 f t tH tH | [ | [ 1 'CO 


rH 1 tH 1 I III f I 1 


H/< 


i i i i i t-h i i r f i 


CM 


1 ! r i 1 1 F 1 1 1 1 I oo 


1 tH tH <M i-i \ 1 tH tH CM 1 


a> 


1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 t 1 |H 


1 1 1 CO ! I II 1 tH 1 


o 

tH 




1 1 I rH I rH I I II 1 


HH 


i 1 1 I 1 1 i i I tH tH j CO 


i i f i i r r i i i i | cm 


1 1 1 tH tH I | | | ! | 


' HH 


1 1 tH 1 | | I I I 1 II"* 


1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 tH 1 


VO 


iH I I rH I | I | I I ! 


CO 


1 tH i i i i I tH i i i r o 


i i i r i i i \ i rH i 


rH 


1 1 rH I I 1 • r 1 tH I I 


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1 
i i i i i i tH r f i i j th 


1 1 1 CM I tH ■ I II I 1 


b- 




rH | 1 rH 1 rH I I I iH tH 


: rH 
rH 


IrHCMHHtHrHtHrHtHCM 1 


co 


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Hip Disease, 

Inanition, .... 

Inflammation of the Brain, 

Marasmus, 

Meningites, Tubercular, , 

Peritonites, 

Pleuro-Pneumonia, . 

Pneumonia, 

Scurvy, .... 

Tabes Mesenterica, . 

Tumor, Abdominal, . 


1 



24 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 





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1 IH I CM .1111 tH 1 | rH 1 I 


•Ofi 0} o* moiji 


'l IH 1 H I ] I | rH, | r_) | | | 


■Qf oi 08 moaj 


1 IH CO (M rH I I | CM CM 1 | 1 rH 


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1 1 CM rH CM rH I I | (MO 1 O) | N 


•OS o^ 01 uioj^ 


1 1 CO CO 1 t^ 1 rH H CO O | | | | 


•01 o% fi uicaa 


1 O O OH O ^ N OJ 00 I G | Ol H 
rH t— 1 r- 1 


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1 1 CM CM I CM 1 1 rH CM ( rH |. | ! 


| z o; i rao.i^ 


CM 1 CO II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•atja.f Xjopufi 


CM 1 CM II 1 r-H | I 1 1 I I I I 




•jaquis^das 


1 1 CO CM CO rH | rH | CO rH CO 1 1 1 


•;sn.§ny 


•* IN CO 1 II (Ml COICMIII 


■A«r 


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■aunp 


IH | || IH I | IICMIII 


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III HH CU CO I H 1 (MHHH 


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ICMCO rHrH CM I LO CO rHCMIIICO 


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IICM H 1 rHlrHl 1 I 1 1 1 H 


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•^■euio^ 


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rH rH rH r-i 


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CO CMrH rH CM CM rH rl 


DISEASES. 


Alimentary Canal, Diseases of — 
Cholera Infantum, 
Cancrum Oris, . 
Diarrhoea, .... 

Other Dis. of Alimentary Canal, 
Debility, 

Eye, Diseases of — 
Opthalmia, 

Purulent, . 

Strumous, . 

Ulceration of Cornea, 

Other Diseases of the Eye, ; 
Epilepsy, ..... 
Fever, Simple, .... 

Bilious, . . ... 

Brain, . . . 

Intermittent, . 



1859.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



25 



III 1 H | 1 | 1 1 rHllllllllllllll CM 


1 CM 1 llllll 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 H 1 H 1 1 iH 


iCOl llllll 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rH rH H 1 H 1 1 1 1 H 


III llllll 1 HI|l||rH|||rH|HH|| rH 


CO CO H llllll 1 CO 1 1 IHOJH |H | | 1 O 1 (M 00 


05 1 (N llllll i-l rHllllllllH|H||lO rH 


HH 1 CM | (NHWOOrtl rH CM CO 1 rH | 1 1 r- 1 | lOOJ 1 1 HH CO 
CM 


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CM "* rH 


III Q 1 OSH^ | CM rHIIIIIrHll.llllCMl rH 


III CO 1 CO CM H I lO I III'I 1 1 I 1 1 1 II t 1 1 


1 IH lOIIIII rH 1 1 1 1 1 ! I 1 1 I 1 ! 1 1 1 1 




IH I 1 1 H CM CM rH HH COI|lll|rH||rH|rH|rH CO 
rH 


CM 1 1 llCOrHlOO CM COIIIIIIIIIIIrHlOl CM 

rH 


COII lll|ll CM llllllllllllrHlrH rH 


CM 1 1 lllrHll I |rHrHl||rH||||rH||| CM 


rHll 1 1 IH ItH 1 lllllllll|rH||COCM CM 


rHCMrH |H| | ICO CM rHllllllrHllllCMlrH CO 


COII CO CM 1 1 i I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CM 
rH 


1 IH O 1 1 1 HH 1 I ICM|H||||rHt~rH|rH|| | 


H r-l H |H|rHO| 1 COIIII|H||HH(MICO|| H 
CM 


CMIH IIIICMH CM HH||||lH|||||rH|| Hi 

CM 


COCMI 1 1 1 1 HH 1 H Hl||H|H|rH|rH|||| rH 
CM 


HCMCO IIHCMHI rH |H|||CMllllllllCO CM 
CM 




C5 rH HH lOWOiNHCO O 00H||tH|CM|CMICMICMCOCO t~ 
tH rH CM 


1 t- CO 00HOHNH G> t^ CO H H 1 CM CM CM 1 HHHQOiOlO Oi 
MiOH tH r-t 


OS 00 ]>• CO HH lO CO 00 1>» HH lO tH H rH H CM "HH CM CM H CO rH O CO 00 CO 
rH CM rH CO £>- rH rH rH rHrH Ol 


Parturition, .... 
Rheumatism, .... 
Spine, Diseases of, . . . 

Skin, Diseases of- — 
Chicken Pox, . 
Erysipelas, 

Measles, .... 
Scald Head, 

Scabies, .... 
Tetter, Dry, 

Other Diseases of the Skin, 

Surgical Diseases — 

Abscess, .... 
Caries, .... 
Dislocation of Elbow, 
Thumb, 
Wrist, . 
Fracture of Femur, . 
Radius, . 
Tibia, . 
Ulner, . 
Frost Bite, 

Synovitis, .... 
Stricture, Urethral, P'rman't, 
Ulcer, .... 

of the Ear, 
Venereal, .... 

Other Surgical Diseases, . 



26 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



•08 <n 01 racu.1 


1 iH 1 1 I I I |H 


i» 


'02. o* 09 raoi.1 


rHH 1 1 r-H | | | ,-1 | <N 


'09 "J OS moij 


1 CM 1 1 OJ 1 1 is 


CM 


•05 oj of- raojj CM CO CO 1 I iH I HtQ 


CO 


•Of o; 08 tuoi^ 


| lO "<H | S T* 1 CO 00 CO 
1 S 


•08 o; qz raoja 


tfHN IW 1 1 (MM 


CO 


•0Z o; oi taojj 


1 r- 1 H H H OI r- 1 ^^ 


o 


•01 oj § uiojj 


1 S 

1 HCOH05WH |CO CO 
rH \ Oi 


•g oi z raojj 


1 1-H 1 1 1 i-l rH <M lO 1 "*f 
rH 1 CO 


Z <n i raoa^ 


1 1 1 1 1 HCJ 1 HH 


i— 1 

co 


'xea£ i japoQ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 O IH 
i— 1 


CO 
CM 




•jaqra^das 


iH OJ i— 1 1 i OJ 1 lO Oi 


CO 

s 


•?sn3nv 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CMCO 


CO 
CO 


•A«f 


1 H i-t | I | | | H 


S3 


•autif 


■H CO H | | | | | CO 


3 


'^K 


rH rH | i— 1 I I | 1 i— 1 


l 
S 
CO 


Iiady 


CO 1 1 1 1 rH | IS 


co 

lO 


•qOJBI\[ 


1 1 rH | | tH O 1 rH 
CM 


CO 
lO 


-£remq3j{ 


1 CO <M 1 lO rH GO | H 
CM rH 


00 
00 


■Xibtiiibp 


1 rH rH | VO CO 1 CO rH 


Oi 
CO 


U8qni90a(i 


1 rH CO H« Oi CM 1 1 CM 


00 

CO _ 


•jaqmsAox 


1 CN rH | CO rH I I CM 1 O 


uaqo^oo 


i ! 

HiOOl | | | | Old 1 H 
1 00 




•apjnia^ 


S CO CM CM Hi 00 CO lOlO 
rH CM CM 


CM 


•3IBK 


1 CO rH CO 00 CO lO SO 
rH rH OI rH CM 


416 


•roox 


S Oi CO lO OI T* 00 CMO 
rH rH Tjl rH CO rH ^ 


CO 

o 
s 


DISEASES. 


Throat and Chest, Diseases of- — 
Asthma, .... 
Bronchitis, 
Consumption, 

Croup, .... 
Influenza, .... 
Pneumonia, 
Whooping Cough, 

Other Dis. of Throat and Chest, 
Various Diseases, 


Totals, .... 



1859.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT—No. 29. 27 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, at Monson : 

Gentlemen, — During my connection with this institution, a 
period of nearly four months, I have been here every day, and 
have regularly performed such services as came within my 
province. I have preached, in the chapel, on the morning of 
every Sabbath, to the officers and inmates. The attendance on 
this service has been very regular and uniform ; all the inmates, 
who are able, being required to be present. The number in 
attendance has usually been at least four hundred and fifty. I 
have endeavored, in these exercises, to adapt myself to the 
capacities of my hearers, and as far as I could to meet their 
state of mind ; to be easy and familiar in style, without descend- 
ing to modes of expression or of illustration offensive to a correct 
taste, or which would derogate from the purity and sublimity 
of revealed truth ; to be clear in statement, affectionate in 
manner, earnest in delivery, seeking always to reach the con- 
science and the heart. I have been pleased to observe in many 
of my hearers, a thoughtful, if not earnest attention ; a quiet, 
sedate, serious deportment in the place of worship. The sing- 
ing has been performed by the children, in a style if not artistic, 
at least reverent and solemn. The exercises have been brought 
within the compass of an hour ; and the hour, to my own mind 
certainly, has been a happy one. My feelings have been deeply 
interested and moved, as I have looked over an audience so 
peculiar in its character, and of such antecedents : more than 
three-fourths of them in the morning of life ; placed here by the 
bounty and under the fostering care of the State, to receive an 
impress, it may be hoped, favorable to their future and final 
welfare. 

I have superintended the Sabbath school, in the afternoon of 
every Lord's day, and have myself regularly taught a class 



28 ALMSHOUSE. AT MONSON. [Oct. 

therein. The teachers of the week-day schools, and one or two 
of the other officers have also been engaged in instructing 
classes. All the children of suitable age have been present on 
these interesting occasions. 

In the interval between the morning service for preaching 
and the Sabbath school, a religious exercise, partly devotional, 
and partly didactic, has been statedly conducted by the worthy 
Superintendent of the institution ; upon which all the inmates, 
young and old, who have had sufficient health, have been 
required to attend. 

There have been evening prayers daily, and prayers on Sab- 
bath mornings, in the chapel, at which I have habitually 
officiated. These exercises have been attended by the children 
and a few of the adults. On these occasions, a brief portion of 
Scripture, selected commonly from the book of Genesis, the 
Psalms, or the Evangelists, has been read ; a few plain remarks 
by way of illustration have been thrown in ; a short prayer 
offered ; a simple hymn has then been sung by the children ; 
closed with the Lord's prayer, repeated by them in unison, and 
that inimitable stanza of Watts — 

" Now I lay me down to sleep " — 

which John Quincy Adams, during his long and useful life, 
never failed to repeat on retiring to his pillow. The entire 
service has occupied but fifteen or twenty minutes ; and to 
visitors, casually present, has seemed touching and impressive. 
The influence of such a service, at the still, solemn hour of 
sunset, immediately preceding the repose of the night, can 
hardly fail of being happy on the three hundred young immor- 
tal minds who daily join in it. That divinely-taught address to 
the Deity — "Our Father!" &c, those sweet Christian melo- 
dies ; that simple, yet matchless stanza, already quoted, the 
boys and girls here taught, can never forget. Wherever they 
may rove in after years, these words of heavenly wisdom, these 
accents of prayer and praise, must linger in the chamber of 
memory while life shall last ; and united with other happy influ- 
ences — or possibly, alone — shall draw the feet, even of the erring 
and wayward, into the paths of duty and salvation. 

I have visited the week-day schools occasionally, and have 
been pleased to notice the diligent and faithful endeavors of the 



1859.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 29 

teachers in imparting the rudiments of an education. These 
schools are well taught and well disciplined, and have been 
pronounced by intelligent and well informed visitors, not infe- 
rior to other schools of the same grade elsewhere. 

The hospitals I have visited more or less frequently, as 
circumstances seemed to require. I have conversed and prayed 
with the sick, as opportunity occurred. Some have died during 
the season, giving pleasing evidence that they made a happy 
exchange of worlds. 

In an institution like this, and in connection with labors 
such as it has been my privilege here to perform, it would be 
unreasonable, perhaps, to expect any very marked, signal, and 
immediate results. The aim and design of this institution is, 
to a great extent, prospective. The influence of Divine truth 
operates here, as elsewhere, silently, gradually, with no outward 
display, yet powerfully "and decisively ; issuing, in many cases to 
us here unknown, in established virtue and in everlasting life. 
Such, I am encouraged to hope, may be the issue of my labors 
here. Looking to God for his blessing, I would take to myself, 
and tender to you, the comfort of that divine exhortation, — 
" In the morning sow thy seed, and in the evening withhold not 
thy hand ; for thou knowest not whether shall prosper, this or 
that, or whether they both shall be alike good." 

With sentiments of great respect, gentlemen, 

I remain very truly yours, 

JOHN A. YINTON, Chaplain. 

State Almshouse, Monson, Sept., 1859. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 35. 

SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



INSPEOTOES 



STATE ALMSHOUSE 



A.T MONSOK 



OCTOBER, 1860 



BOSTON: 

WILLIAM WHITE, PRINTER TO THE STATE. 
1860. 



€ommonu)£Qltl) of Jitaseartjueetts. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT 



To His Excellency the Governor ', and the Honorable Council : 

The Inspectors of the Monson State Almshouse herewith 
submit their Annual Report of the condition of the institution 
for the year ending September 30, 1860. 



The number of inmates in the almshouse, October 1 

1859, was, . . . 
Admitted and born during the year, 
Discharged, indentured, deserted and died, 
Remaining September 30, 1860, . 
Average number supported through the year 
Decrease from the average number supported last year 

Cost of supporting inmates per week, 99^ cents. 



495 

1,414 

1,390 

519 

570 

11 



The general management of the institution during the past 
year has varied little from that in previous years. 

The farm has been productive, yielding a generous reward 
for the labor bestowed upon it. Yery little inmate help has 
been employed on the farm during the summer, not more than 
two or three able-bodied men having been in the institution. 

The almshouse contains so many children, that it is necessary 
to furnish permanent means for their education. Two primary 
schools are kept by female teachers, and a grammar school is 
taught by a male instructor, who has an assistant. The teach- 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

ers are competent and faithful. The primary schools are too 
crowded for the health of the children, as many as one hundred 
often attending each. Should the number of small children 
continue as large as at present, it will be necessary to provide 
another primary school. 

One hundred and eighteen children have been indentured 
during the year, and one hundred and twenty-three have been 
received from the almshouse at Bridgewater. Persons who 
take children usually select the oldest, consequently a large 
number of small boys and girls remain. At least one hundred 
more could have been indentured had they been of an age cor- 
responding with the wants of applicants. In several instances 
where guardians have failed to comply with the terms of the 
indentures, children have been removed, and the indentures 
annulled. 

The general health of inmates has been excellent, only forty- 
five deaths having occurred during the year. Dr. G. M. 
Nichols, for nearly two years physician of the institution, 
resigned in August, and Dr. Joseph D. Nichols, of Taunton, 
was appointed to fill his place. His report will be found 
attached to our own. 

Rev. E. B. Wright, formerly Chaplain, was reappointed to 
supersede Rev. Mr. Vinton, in July last. The Chaplain's 
report is annexed. 

At the time of making our last Report, a reservoir, cement 
and iron water pipe and hydrant were in process of construction. 
An appropriation of one thousand dollars had been made for 
this purpose, but the Inspectors, finding the sum insufficient, 
applied to the extra session of the legislature for leave to use 
one thousand dollars, if that amount should remain unex- 
pended from the regular appropriation for current expenses, to 
complete the work. Leave being granted, that sum was used 
to complete the enterprise. 

The reservoir contains fifty thousand gallons, and is fed by 
never-failing springs. It is located about ninety rods from the 
almshouse, at an elevation one hundred and fifty feet above the 
hydrant in the rear of the main buildings. Hose has been 
procured sufficient to convey water to any part of the buildings, 
and such is the supply and force, that in case of fire, the 
premises could be deluged in a few moments. 



I860.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 5 

The following will show in what manner the appropriations 
were expended : 

Paid Rufus F. Fay, for springs and land, . . $100 00 

C. G. Rice, for cement and iron pipe, and lay- 
ing same, 803 34 

A. Bemis, Miner & Co. , for 500 feet leather and 

rubber hose, couplings, &c, . . . 332 26 

James Gammell and A. R. Fenton, for digging 
reservoir and pipe ditch, .... 

Western Railroad, for freight, 

Gilbert A. Smith, for services, . . 

E. Brown, for lead pipe, .... 

G, M. Fisk, for services and expenses, . 

Homer, Foot & Co., for tubing, 

James G. Allen, for making writings, 

W. N. Flynt, for stone work, .... 

E. Nichols, for tin roofing on hydrant and hose 
house, ....... 

Rufus F. Tay, for stone, and damages to land, 

James Perrey, for painting hydrant and hose 
house, ....... 



First appropriation, ...... 

Second appropriation, ...... 

Calf taken by Mr. Fay in payment for springs, 

$2,025 00 

At the last session of the legislature the sum of two hundred 
dollars was appropriated for the purchase of about two acres of 
land, for several years leased of Rufus F. Fay, for a play-yard. 
One hundred ninety-six dollars and twenty cents was expended 
for this purpose, and the balance returned to the State Treasurer. 

INVENTORY. 

Live stock on the farm, . . . . $2,624 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, .... 2,840 09 
Carriages and agricultural implements, . . 2,171 74 



522 59 


65 


78 


34 


16 


12 


24 


53 55 


1 


26 


2 


00 


20 


00 


12 


87 


56 


67 


8 


28 


$2,025 00 


$1,000 00 


1,000 


00- 


25 


00 



6 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 

Other furniture in inmates' department, including 

apparatus for extinguishing fire, 
Personal property in Superintendent's department, 
Ready-made clothing, . 
Dry goods, . 
Provisions and groceries, 
Drugs and medicines, . 
Fuel, .... 
Library, 



officers' salaries 

John M. Brewster, Jr., Superintendent, 

Mrs. J. M. Brewster, Matron, 

Ebenezer B. Wright, Chaplain, 

Joseph D. Nichols, Physician, 

Joseph H. Brewster, Clerk, . 

Elizabeth A. Ried, Nurse, .... 

Edwin N. Montague, Teacher and charge of boys, 

Maggie H. Brewster, Teacher, 

Marietta Hannum, " ... 

Katie Lacy, " ... 

Eliza S. Norton, Seamstress, 

Lucretia G. Bodfish, Assist ant- Matron, 

Sarah S. Nichols " " 

Stillman Thurston and wife, Cooks in inmates 
department, ...... 

Lucina Wansor, Cook in Superintendent's depart- 
ment, 

W. J. Clark, Supervisor, 

John N. Lacy, Engineer, 

Charles Gates, Baker, . 

Bela B. Tiffany, Farmer, 

Charles Adams, " 

Frank H. Wood, Assistant, 

Sanford C. Bond, Watchman, 



$2,439 00 


6,672 83 


3,632 11 


2,911 


86 


3,303 


16 


894 


33 


1,109 86 


700 


00 


2,611 


60 


351 


83 


132,262 41 


$1,200 00 


300 


00 


400 


00 


600 00 


400 


00 


208 00 


300 


00 


156 


00 


156 


00 


156 


00 


182 


00 


156 


00 


156 


00 



575 00 



156 


00 


300 


00 


480 


00 


312 


00 


300 


00 


250 


00 


216 


00 


200 


00 



$7,159 00 



I860.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 7 

INSPECTORS. 

Gordon M. Fisk, ..... . . $100 00 

Samuel Banister, 100 00 

Gilbert A. Smith, 100 00 



$300 00 



We renew our recommendation for the introduction of steam 
for warming purposes. The estimated cost is about five thou- 
sand dollars. 

We also recommend that a building be erected for a hospital. 
There is considerable timber on the farm which could be used 
in its construction, so that an appropriation of one thousand 
dollars would be sufficient. 

Where so many persons are fed and lodged under one roof, a 
hospital for the sick in the same building must be injurious to 
those in health. In the autumn of 1857 the male hospital was 
removed from the main building to a building originally intended 
for a wood-house. Since its removal the annual mortality has 
greatly diminished. A removal of the female hospital would, 
we are confident, further conduce to the health of the inmates. 

The almshouse system, as now pursued, is by no means per- 
fect. The mingling together of persons whose vicious habits 
have brought upon them infirmities and pauperism, with young 
children who are easily influenced by the examples of their 
associates, is entirely wrong. The evil is partially remedied in 
this almshouse by a separation of adults from the children; yet 
there are occasions when they are unavoidably brought together. 
A classification of State paupers, by making one of the alms- 
houses a school for all the children, and the other two recep- 
tacles for adults, is the only way to obviate the difficulty. 

Pauperism is not considered a crime, though crime makes 
more paupers than misfortune. There are cases where punish- 
ment is due rather than charity ; yet all share alike in the 
comforts which the Commonwealth provides. 

If the overseers of poor were required to investigate more 
thoroughly the condition and circumstances of those applying 
for assistance, there would be fewer persons sent to the alms- 
houses. 



8 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

For further particulars relating to the management and con- 
dition of the institution, we refer you to the report of the 
Superintendent, which accompanies our own. 

In closing, we again bear testimony to the earnest labors and 
faithful care of the Superintendent and subordinate officers in 
the discharge of their respective duties. 

GORDON M. FISK, 
SAMUEL BANISTER, 
GILBERT A. SMITH, 

Inspectors. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
September 30, 1860. 



I860.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse at Monson : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit the following report 
of the institution under my charge, for the year ending October 
1,1860: 



The number in the institution at the date of the last 

report, October 1, 1859, 495 

The number admitted since, including sixteen born in 



II1C JLllBtllUl/lUll, .... 


last 


report, 


. 


J-,'±-L'± 


Whole number supported since 


1,909 


Number discharged and deserted, 




, 


1,227 




indentured and on trial, . 


. 


. 


118 




died, 


. 


. 


45 




Remaining, October 1, 1860 : 










Men, . . . % . 


. 


. 50 






Women, . . . . 




76 






Boys under 15 years of age, . 


'. 


264 






Girls, " " " " . 


. 


129 






Total, .... 


.• 




519 


1,909 



Average number supported through the year, 570. 
Seventy paupers sent out of the State. 



Persons admitted this year were born in 
Massachusetts, .... 
Maine, 

2 



312 
15 



10 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



New Hampshire, 












11 


Vermont, 












7 


Connecticut, . 












35 


Rhode Island, 












6 


New York, 












67 


Other States, . 












36 


Ireland, . 












545 


England, 












172 


Germany, 












32 


Scotland, 












76 


British Provinces, 












58 


France, . 












8 


Other countries and at sea, 








19 


Unknown, 












15 



1,414 
Towns and Counties in Massachusetts from which Paupers have 

been received. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 


Easthampton, .... 6 


Adams, 6 


Enfield, . 






2 


Becket, . 
Hancock, 








1 
1 


Goshen, . 
Hadley, . 






1 

1 


Hinsdale, 








1 


Northampton, . 






8 


Lee, 








2 


South Hadley, 






1 


Otis, 








3 


Ware, . 






7 


Peru, 








2 


Westhampton, 






1 


Pittsfield, 








19 


36 


Sandisfield, 








5 


Sheffield, 








3 


.HAMPDEN COUNTY. 


Stockbridge, 
Tyringham, 








6 
1 


Agawam, 
Blandford, 








1 

1 


Washington, . 
West Stockbridge, 
Williamstown, 
Windsor, 






1 
7 
2 
4 


Brimfield, 
Chicopee, 
Chester, . 
Granville, 








5 

25 

1 

1 


64 


Holyoke, 
Holland, . 








14 
1 


HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 


Ludlow, . 








3 


Amherst, .... 2 


Palmer,* 








865 


Belchertown, .... 7 


Springfield, 








53 



* Nearly all travelling paupers. 



I860.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 

Table — Continued. 



11 



West Springfield, ... 2 


New Braintree, 


2 


Westfield, .... 4 


Southbridge, . 






4 


Wilbraham, .... 10 


Sutton, . 






4 


986 


Sturbridge, 
Upton, . 






3 
1 


FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Bernardston, .... 1 
Deerfield, .... 4 
Greenfield, . . . . 1 
Shelburne, .... 1 


Uxbridge, 
Warren, . 
West Boylston, 
West Brookfield, 
Westborough, . 
Worcester, 






3 

4 
2 
4 
8 
52 


7 




130 


WORCESTER COUNTY. 






Auburn, 2 


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 




Douglas, . 








2 


Boston, .... 


22 


Fitchburg, 








7 






Gardner, 








1 


NORFOLK COUNTY. 




Grafton, . 








5 


Koxbury, . 


1 


Hardwick, 








3 




* 


Holden, . 








2 


Bridgewater State Almshouse, 


123 


Millbury, 








1 


Tewksbury State Almshouse, . 


8 


Mendon, . 








1 


Rainsford Island, . 


8 


Milford, . 








11 


Transient, . . . . 


13 


North Brookfic 


Id, 






8 


Born in the house, . 






16 



Of the number received, 165 came into the State in 1859, 
and 208 in 1860 ; and of the 1,414 received during the year, 
all but about 120 are of foreign birth and parentage. 

Expenditures from October 1, 1859, to October 1, 1860 : 



Paid for dry goods, 


$3,629 91 


flour, 


3,964 33 


milk, 


3,565 45 


beef and pork, .... 


. 2,340 03 


fish, ....... 


248 62 


fuel and lights, 


3,122 41 


tin and wooden ware, . 


93 40 


books, stationery and printing, 


114 88 



12 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Pa 


id for fruit and vegetables, 


. 1128 38 




straw, ...... 


164 56 




sundry groceries, .... 


. 2,464 98 




medical supplies, .... 


208 60 




railroad freight, .... 


252 62 




express and telegraph companies, . 


15 81 




hardware and cutlery, 


59 95 




boots, shoes and leather, . 


820 57 




brooms, mops and brushes, 


153 25 




furniture, ..... 


33 37 




poultry and eggs, . . .... 


58 46 




blacksmithing, .... 


91 18 




lime, cement, sand and brick, . 


92 13 




grain, ...... 


745 38 




potatoes, 


160 37 




postage, 


50 22 




beans, 


114 83 




beef cattle and other stock, 


. 2,600 24 




soap and potash, .... 


310 90 




crockery, . . . ... 


115 31 




crackers, 


69 60 




stoves and fixtures, .... 


122 76 




powder, 


9 29 




hats and caps, ..... 


137 00 




labor of sundry persons, . . . 


150 45 




repairs and improvements, 


. 1,546 00 




transportation of paupers, 


170 91 




tobacco, 


21 78 




vinegar, 


40 77 




expenses, 


257 19 




Dr. Jones, for services rendered in the 






absence of resident physician, 


40 00 




salaries, ...... 


7,126 81 




farming implements and seeds, 


166 18 




wagons, . . . . 


175 00 




malt, ....... 


7 50 




baskets, ....... 


21 18 




rent of land, 


12 00 




invoicing State property, . 


67 50 




advertising homes wanted for children, . 


41 75 



153 80 

16 17 

158 71 


$36,259 49 
300 00 
304 15 


$36,863 64 



I860.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 13 

Paid for coal sifter, . $27 00 

Inspectors, for the purpose of completing 
the provisions of the Resolve, chapter 
64, of 1859, ralating to the better pro- 
tection of the State Almshouses from 

fire, 

town of Uxbridge, for support of paupers, 
sundries, 



Inspectors' salaries, 
" expenses, 



Cr. by cash, of Alien Commissioners, for 

the support of pauper from Raynham, $29 00 

Cr. by cash, of towns and individuals, 

for support of paupers, . . . 55 86 

Cr. by cash, for articles sold, . . 1,325 27 

Cr. by cash, of State Treasurer, . . 35,453 51 

$36,863 64 

$18.66 of the expenditures are for bills made pre- 
vious to June 1, 1858. 

Total expenditures for the year ending September 

30, 1860, are $36,863 64 

From this deduct — 

Bills of former year, .... $18 66 

Transportation of paupers, . . . 170 91 

Repairs and improvements, . . . 1,546 00 

Lime, cement, sand and brick, . . 92 13 

Invoicing State property, . . . 67 50 
Cash paid Inspectors, towards the com- 
pletion of work for protecting the 

buildings from fire, .... 153 80 

Cash paid Dr. Jones, for medical services, 40 00 
Cash received for articles sold, and for 

support of paupers, . . . . 1,410 13 



$3,499 13 



Total amount of running expenses, . . $33,364 51 



14 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

The amount of expenditures for nine months, com- 
mencing January 1, I860, and ending September 
30, 1860, is $25,819 49 

Inspectors' salaries, . . . . . 225 00 

" expenses, . . . . . 247 75 



$26,292 24 



Cr. by cash, for articles sold and for 

support of paupers, . . . . $983 13 
Cr. by cash of State Treasurer, . . 25,309 11 

■ $26,292 24 

Balance remaining of the appropriation for the year 

1860, . . . . . . : .. . $9,690 89 

Special appropriation for land in the year 1860 : 

Cash paid Rufus Fay for land, . . $196 20 

Cash paid for recording deed, . . 50 

$196 70 

Cr. by cash of State Treasurer, .... 196 70 

The amount of inventory September 30, 1859, was $30,161 42 
Total amount of cash received from State Treasurer, 

from October 1, 1859, to October 1, 1860, . . 35,453 51 



$65,614 93 



From this amount should be deducted, as per invoice 
September 30, 1860 : 

Live stock on the farm, .... $2,624 00 
Produce of the farm on hand, . . 2,840 09 
Carriages and agricultural implements, . 2,171 74 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 2,439 00 
Beds and bedding in the inmates' depart- 
ment, 6,672 83 

Other furniture in the inmates' depart- 
ment, including apparatus for fire de- 
partment, . . . . . . 3,632 11 



I860.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 



15 



Personal property in the Superintendent's 
department, .... 

Ready made clothing, . 

Dry goods, . 

Provisions and groceries, 

Drugs and medicines, . 

Fuel, . ... 

Library, . 

For repairs and improvements, including 
lime, cement, sand and brick, 

For transportation of paupers, 

For invoicing State property, . 

For cash paid Dr. Jones, for medical 
services, 

S\)r cash received for articles sold, and 
for support of paupers, 

For cash paid Inspectors towards the 
completion of work for protecting the 
buildings from fire, . . . . 

For cash paid towards springs for Inspect- 
ors, 

For expense of boarding workmen while 
engaged in laying the water pipes for 
Inspectors, 

Cash on hand, . 



. 3,303 


.16 


. 894 33 


. 1,109 


86 


. TOO 00 


. 2,611 


60 


. 351 


83 


! 1,638 13 


. 170 


91 


67 50 



40 00 



1,410 13 



153 80 



25 00 



37 50 
432 71 



Making the net sum for the support of inmates, 
Being 851.54 for each pauper one year, or 99^ cents 
per week. 



$36,238 09 



,376 84 



ESTIMATED PRODUCE 


OP THE FARM. 




29 pigs sold, $126 79 


1 yoke oxen, . 








200 75 


4,005 pounds pork, at 10 cents, 








400 50 


3,033 pounds beef, at 8 cents, 








242 64 


622 pounds veal, at 10 cents, 








62 20 


77 tons hay, at $12, . 








924 00 


2 " cornstalks, at $6, . 








12 00 


7 " oats, at $12, . 








84 00 



16 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



1 

8 
i 

2 

750 

2,400 

250 

75 

67 

18 

400 

75 

125 

30 

42 

50 

9 

5,000 

2,500 



ton 


rye, 


$16 00 


tons 


squashes, at $15, . 


120 00 


acre corn fodder, . 


25 00 


bush 


3ls potatoes, at 50 cents, 


375 00 


a 


carrots, at 25 cents, . 


600 00 


u 


onions, at 75 cents, . 


188 00 


u 


corn, at $1, 


75 00 


a 


green corn, at 37J cents, . 


25 12 


a 


peas, at 11.25 . 


22 50 


u 


beets, at 25 cents, . 


100 00 


a 


parsnips, at 25 cents, 


18 75 


a 


turnips, at 25 cents, . 


31 25 


u 


tomatoes, at 25 cents, 


7 50 


a 


cucumbers, at 25 cents, . 


10 50 


a 


apples, at 50 cents, . 


25 00 


loads 


pumpkins, at $1.50, 


13 50 


heads of cabbage, at 4 cents, 


200 00 


gallons milk, at 121 cents, . 


312 50 



$4,218 50 



General prosperity has attended our labors in all the depart- 
ments of the institution. The crops, though not all secured, 
are giving the promise of an abundant harvest. The vegetable 
garden, containing some six acres, if not the model, is one of 
the largest and most valuable in western Massachusetts. The 
cultivation of this garden has been carried on by the old men 
and boys, whose labors elsewhere upon the farm would not have 
been very productive. The out-door inmate help, through the 
summer months, has been very light, being equal to no more 
than one good able-bodied man. In the winter, our male 
strength is much greater ; then I am in the habit of employing 
a large number in blasting rocks, drawing stones, and building 
under-ground drains, cutting bushes, and removing stumps, 
when the snows and frosts permit, thereby keeping all the adult 
males busy, who are able to work, believing it to be uncharita- 
ble and not humane for the State to support them without 
labor. 

The schools continue to maintain their character for good 
order, faithful instruction, and kind parental discipline. Those 



I860.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 17 

who have been accustomed to visit the schools cannot but 
accord a good degree of praise to the teachers for their diligence, 
industry, and the success with which they have discharged 
their duties. The scholars have averaged some three hundred. 
The number of children too young to attend school is now much 
larger than in any previous year since I have been connected 
with the institution. Of these very small children there are 
about one hundred, and the feeling of responsibility becomes 
proportionally greater. The faithful guardianship of such a 
trust calls for the most constant vigilance and undeviating 
adherence to truth and duty. 

Good homes have been provided, during the year, for upwards 
of one hundred of these orphan children. This is one of the 
most redeeming features in the whole State pauper system, the 
placing so many poor children, from year to year, under the 
protecting care of intelligent Christian families. 

The condition of the medical department will be fully set 
forth by the resident Physician, whose report is annexed to my 
own. 

The Chaplain's report, also annexed, will show the moral and 
religious state of the institution, to which I respectfully refer 
you. 

Among the various improvements of the year, the greatest of 
all has been the introduction of water into the court-yard, for 
the express purpose of extinguishing fire. Should such a 
catastrophe befall us, which Heaven forbid, we feel ourselves 
reasonably secure against this devouring element. We have 
ability to throw water with great power throughout all the 
buildings and barn, by means of strong leather hose attached to 
a hydrant fed by pipes of six and four inches calibre, leading 
from a reservoir ninety rods distant, containing fifty thousand 
gallons of water supplied by unfailing springs at a height of 
one hundred and fifty feet above the surface of the yard in 
which the hydrant is situated, and seventy feet above the balus- 
trades of the main portion of the building. With all this pro- 
tection for such combustible buildings, and for such a family as 
this, composed as it is of the old and infirm, of the sick and 
idiotic, of helpless infancy and thoughtless childhood, — the State 
cannot but congratulate herself upon the constant presence of 



18 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

this admirable enginery to assist in the warding off and escape 
from such a dreadful calamity. 

The many necessary repairs have considerably increased the 
expenses of the institution during the past year. The original 
floors throughout the establishment were very poor, and I have 
been obliged to relay some of them, and many more need to be 
made good, in the same manner. As early in the spring as will 
be suitable, the whole exterior of the buildings should be cov- 
ered with a rich coat of paint. It will be economy to have this 
done soon as may be, and a special appropriation of one thou- 
sand dollars will be needed to meet the expense. It would be 
well to draw the attention of the legislature early to this 
subject. 

In my judgment, it would be highly advantageous to the State 
were the laws more rigid in regard to admissions and discharges. 
Too many seek support in our State almshouses, who would not 
be found within their walls were the laws more specific and 
stringent. 

In submitting this annual report, gentlemen, I would ac- 
knowledge your devotion to the interests of the institution, and 
the kind assistance and support I have received at your hands. 

The experiences of the past year cannot fail to fill our hearts 
with gratitude to Him who has thus carried us safely through 
all its duties, trials, anxieties and cares. In the coming year 
may His blessing rest upon the institution. 

JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jr., 
Superintendent, 

Monson^ State Almshouse, ) 
October 1, 1860. J 



I860.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 



19 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — I beg leave to submit the following report, 
which will exhibit the condition of the medical department of 
this institution, for the year ending September 30, 1860. 

Allow me to premise, that as I have had charge of this 
department only for the last six weeks, the statements which 
follow are for the most part drawn from the records of my 
predecessor, rather than from my own personal observations. 



Number remaining in the hospital September 30 1859, . 62 

Admitted during the year, 490 

Births, 16 

Deaths, 45 

Discharged, 385 

Remaining in hospital, . . . . . ' .60 



The following synopsis shows the diseases which have been 
treated, and the number in each disease. 



Abscess, 






7 


Contusion, 








3 


Amaurosis, 






1 


Debility, 








13 


Amenorrhea, 






1 


Dislocation, 








3 


Amputation finger, 






1 


Diarrhoea, . 








7 


Angina Simp, 






2 


Dyspepsia, . 








1 


Asthma, 






1 


Diphtheritis, 








2 


Bronchitis, . 






7 


Endogastritis, 








11 


Burns, 






3 


Erysipelas, 








4 


Cancrum Oris, . 






4 


Fevers, 








1 


Caries, 






2 


Fits, . 








3 


Chilblains, . 






. 2 


Fever, Simplex, 








12 


Cirrhosis, . 






. 2 


Billious, 








. 2 


Conjunctivis, 






. 2 


Intermittent, 






2 


Colic, 






2 


Frost Bite, 








5 



20 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Fracture, . 






. 4 


Purpura, 






. 1 


Gangrene Lungs, 






. 2 


Phthisis, 






. 11 


Gonorrhoea, 






. 2 


Paralysis, . 






3 


Gunpowder Accidents 






. 2 


Rheumatism, 






11 


Hydrocephalus, . 






. . 1 


Roseola, 






1 


Herpes Zoster, . 






. 1 


Rachitis, 






. 2 


Hypochondriasis, 






. 1 


Scrofula, 






. 3 


Hysteria, . 






. 3 


Scabies, 






. 3 


Insanity, 






. 1 


Stye, . 






. 1 


Jaundice, . 






. 3 


Syphilis, Primary, 






1 


Measles, 






46 


Secondary, 






2 


Meningitis, . 






. 1 


Synovitis, . 






. 2 


Necrosis, 






. 1 


Scarlatina, 






1 


Ophthalmia, 






. 206 


Spinal Disease, . 






2 


Orchitis, 






. 2 


Tinea Capitis, 






o 


Psoriasis, . 






. 4 


Tabes Mesenterica, 






1 


Pertussis, . 






. 9 


Tonsillitis, . 






2 


Pneumonia, 






. 14 


Ulcer, Legs, 






11 


Parturition, 






. 16 


Ulcer, 






3 


Pleuro-Pneumonia, 






. 1 


Vicarious Menstruation, 




1 


Piles, . 






. 1 




Causes of Death. 


Apoplexy, 1 


Marasmus, . . . .6 


Burn, 






. 1 


Measles, 






1 


Cancrum Oris, . 






1 


Ovarian Tumor, 






1 


Cholera Infantum, 






1 


Phthisis, 






11 


Cirrhosis, . 






. 1 


Pneumonia, 






2 


Congestion Brain, 






. 1 


Rachitis, 






1 


Cyanosis, . 






1 


Scarlatina, . 






1 


Debility, 






3 


Spinal Disease, . 






2 


Dentition, . 






1 


Scrofula, 






1 


Gangrene Lungs, 






. 1 


Syphilis, 






1 


Hydrocephalus, -. 






3 


Tabes Mesenterica, 






1 


Jaundice, . 






2 











Besides the diseases already enumerated as having been 
treated during the year, there are many cases of temporary 
sickness relieved without admission to the hospital, and con- 
cerning which there is no record. 

It will be seen that there have been a large number of cases 
of ophthalmia admitted into the hospital. The records show 
that last spring this disease was almost unknown in the institu- 
tion. It then made its appearance, as I have been told, among 
children brought here from Bridgewater, and spread with such 



I860.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 21 

rapidity that in August there were over one hundred cases in 
the hospital. By close and unremitting attention this number 
has been materially reduced, and there are but twenty-two 
cases remaining at the close of the year. My efforts in the sore 
eye ward have been ably seconded by Mrs. Brennan, an inmate 
woman who has charge of that department, and it is but justice 
to say, that her faithful services have materially contributed to 
the measure of success which has attended my labors in that 
department. 

Permit me to suggest an improvement in regard to the floors 
in the hospitals. These floors were laid with unseasoned 
hemlock boards — unmatched — many of them shaky, and have 
shrunk so as not only to reave wide insterstices between the 
boards, but yawning seams in the boards themselves, wherever 
they are shaky ; and such instances are by no means unfre- 
quent. These floors are washed two or three times a week, 
being drenched with a plentiful supply of soap and water. A 
goodly portion of this water finds its way into these instertices 
and seams, to say nothing of what is absorbed into the boards 
themselves, and leaves a dampness for hours, uncomfortable to 
the well, and very injurious to the sick. These floors should 
be covered or replaced with hard pine, thoroughly seasoned 
and matched. They could then be kept clean by dry scrubbing, 
using sand or sand paper to remove the spots should there be 
any, and the necessity of deluging them with water be avoided 
entirely, or only be necessary at long intervals. I cannot but 
indulge the hope that an improvement costing so little and 
contributing so largely to the comfort and well-being of the 
sick, will promptly receive that attention which an enlightened 
humanity dictates, and which its importance evidently demands. 

Allow me in conclusion, to express my grateful acknowledg- 
ments for the kindness and consideration with which I have 
uniformly been treated during my connection with the insti- 
tution. 

JOSEPH D. NICHOLS, Physician. 

State Almshouse, Monson, Sept. 30, 1860. 



22 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, at Monson : 

Gentlemen, — I have officiated as Chaplain only the last five 
months of the past year. My services during this time have 
been similar to what they were* when I was employed here 
formerly. Every evening, except in a very few instances when I 
have been abroad, I have read a portion of Scripture and offered 
prayer in the chapel ; after which the children have sung a 
hymn, and then repeated the Lord's prayer, together with those 
four lines which thousands of pious mothers have taught their 
children to repeat when about to take their nightly rest. At 
our evening worship all the school children, unless prevented 
by illness, and a few adults, have commonly been present. 
Every Sabbath morning at half-past eight o'clock, the children 
have assembled as a Sabbath school. In this I have constantly 
assisted, being aided faithfully by the school teachers and some 
other officers of the institution. The exercises of the Sabbath 
school have always been opened with prayer and closed with 
singing. 

At ten o'clock Sabbath mornings, there has uniformly been a 
meeting for preaching and devotional exercises, the congrega- 
tion consisting of the inmates, of all ages, who have been able 
to attend, and the officers of the institution. At this meeting, 
we have usually had singing ; once by the children, and two or 
three times by some of the officers, assisted by a melodeon. 
In my discourses I have endeavored to present important truths 
plainly, seriously, and affectionately; and my hearers have 
appeared to give commendable attention. As the children 
receive so much religious instruction in the Sabbath school, I 
have thought it proper to adapt many of my sermons rather to 
the adult hearers ; a considerable number of whom are present 
every Sabbath morning. Several discourses consisting very 



I860.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 35. 23 

much of Scripture narratives, have seemed to be especially 
interesting to the children. 

Sabbath afternoons our respected Superintendent has regu- 
larly met the inmates in the chapel and performed some services 
for their benefit, as in former years. 

There has been an interesting prayer-meeting in the men's 
hospital, statedly, on Friday evenings, at which I have received 
help from several pious inmates. I believe this meeting has 
been beneficial to them, and to some others. One sick young 
man, who came to the almshouse without a Christian hope, and 
who died after being here two months, seemed to be much 
benefited by means of the prayers which he heard offered, and 
the instruction which he received in the hospital. It was his 
belief that his heart was savingly changed during his residence 
here. 

I have visited the sick when I thought it expedient, and 
when an inmate has died I have, in almost every case, offered a 
prayer before the body has been taken away. 

In conclusion, I would say, I am conscious that my services 
have been imperfect, and were I not assured, that Cod is pleased 
sometimes to render imperfect services a means of good, I 
should not choose to be employed in my present situation. 

With feelings of gratitude, gentlemen, for the kindness which 
you have shown me, I subscribe myself, 

Very truly yours, 

EBENEZER B. WRIGHT, Chaplain. 

State Almshouse, Monson, Sept., 1860. 



. * < 
PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 30. 

EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



INSPECTORS 



STATE ALMSHOUSE, 



A.T l^LON & ON . 



OCTOBER, 1861. 



BOSTON: 

WILLIAM WHITE, PRINTER TO THE STATE. 
1861. 



Commonweal!!) of iltci00acl)U0£tt0. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor , and the Honorable Council : 

With the year closing September 30, 1861, the Inspectors of 
the State Almshouse at Monson submit their Annual Report. 

The history of the institution during the past year is little 
different from that of previous years. The same attentive care 
has been exercised, the same economy and prudence used, that 
have heretofore characterized its management. 

The number of inmates in the Almshouse at the time of 

making our last Report, October 1, 1860, was . . 519 

Admitted and born during the last year, . . . 2,085 

Discharged, indentured, deserted and died, . . . 2,008 

Remaining September 30, 1861, . . . . 596 

Average number supported through the year, . . 590 

Increase from the average number supported last year, 20 

Cost of supporting each inmate per week, $1.02-| 

Improvements on the farm have been going on as in years 
previous. A large amount of stone wall has been built, with 
the intention of soon having the whole farm well fenced with 
such durable material. 

Considerable land, hitherto so wet and encumbered with 
stumps and rocks as to be nearly worthless, has been under- 
drained and cleared, adding several acres to the productive 
portion. 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

The hay crop has been increased twenty tons over that of last 
year. More milk has been produced on the farm, and less 
purchased for the use of the inmates. 

"Vigorous efforts now making to reclaim all unproductive land, 
and to enrich every portion, will in a few years render the farm 
one of the best in the Commonwealth. 

General health has blessed the inmates to a remarkable 
degree. The mortality has slightly increased over that of last 
year, yet it has not been greater than the usual average in 
communities of equal population. The Physician's report, 
annexed, gives full particulars of the sanitary department. 

Three schools, with an average attendance of three hundred 
and twenty-five children, have been kept by competent and 
faithful teachers. The number of pupils is too large in each 
school, and the necessity of adding another branch to this 
department is apparent. As the little girls and boys are fitted 
for indenturing by their teachers, receiving impressions of a 
permanent character, we consider the schools an important 
feature of the institution. 

The number of children indentured and put out on trial 
during the year is eighty-nine. This is a smaller number than 
were indentured in each of the two preceding years, and is 
owing, no doubt, to the unfortunate condition of the country. 

The binding out of children is a source of constant solicitude 
to the Inspectors. While the larger portion bound out prove 
satisfactory, in some instances the guardian makes a bad bargain, 
and after keeping the child several months, and in some cases 
three or four years, the Inspectors are called upon to annul the 
indentures and take the child back. The complaint is usually 
that the child has developed a stubborn disposition and become 
unmanageable. The fault is sometimes on the other side, and 
to ascertain the real state of the case, to do what is best 
for the child, and deal justly by the guardian, is no enviable 
undertaking. 

We renew the recommendation we have made for several 
years — classification of State paupers. The more we experience 
of pauper life and almshouse management, the more convinced 
we are that until the children are separated from adults, and 
the herding of old and young together in one institution is 
abandoned, the system will be far from perfect. 



1861.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 5 

The moral and religious condition of the inmates is set forth 
in the Chaplain's report, which accompanies our own. 

An appropriation of twelve hundred dollars ($ 1,200) was 
made by the last legislature for a new boiler and boiler-house. 
The Inspectors have drawn and expended one thousand and 
sixty dollars (11,060) of the appropriation in carrying out the 
resolve, and the remainder will be required to complete the 
work. The old boiler is still in position, and can be used at any 
time should an accident occur to the new one, thus remedying 
delays and expense, which often occurred when reliance was 
placed upon a single boiler. The new boiler is the best that 
could be obtained, larger than the old one, and with proper care 
will last many years. 

The legislature also appropriated two thousand dollars 
($2,000) for a hospital building, but in consideration of the 
large demand upon the treasury to aid in sustaining the General 
Government, the Inspectors have decided not to draw the money, 
but to get along with present accommodations till the State is 
relieved of its heavy burden. The sum of one thousand dollars 
($1,000) of unexpended money appropriated for current ex- 
penses, was also granted for laying new floors, but this amount 
will not be drawn for the same reason. 

While the cost of supporting inmates per capita has slightly 
increased over that of last year, the amount of money drawn for 
maintaining the almshouse during the fiscal year, ending 
September 30, is two thousand and sixty dollars ($2,060) less 
than for the previous year. 

While we are thus able to show that a system of continued 
economy is pursued, we take pleasure in stating that the 
inmates are well fed and clothed, that neglect in any department 
is not permitted, and that the almshouse and its management 
will bear comparison with any other similar institution. 

INVENTORY. 

Live stock on the farm, $2,701 25 



Produce of the farm on hand, 
Carriages and agricultural implements, 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 
Beds and bedding in inmates' department, 



3,413 56 
2,234 47 

2,745 00 
6,701 12 



6 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Other furniture in inmates' department, including 

apparatus for extinguishing fire, . . . $3,815 82 

Personal property in Superintendent's department, 2,691 64 

Ready-made clothing, 3,183 94 

Dry goods, 703 15 

Provisions and groceries, 1,316 72 

Drugs and medicines, 715 25 

Fuel, ......... 2,551 25 

Library, 351 83 



OFFICERS AND THEIR SALARIES 

John M. Brewster, Jr., and wife, 

Ebenezer B. Wright, 

Joseph D. Nichols, 

Joseph H. Brewster, 

Elizabeth A. Ried, 

Edwin N. Montague, 

Lucy M. Calton, . 

Mattie A. Browning, 

Lois Bliss, 

Eliza S. Norton, . 

Lucretia G. Bodfish, 

Sarah S. Nichols, 

Stillman Thurston and wife, 

John N. Lacy, 

Willard J. Clark, . 

Charles Gates, 

Bela B. Tiffany, . 

Charles Adams, 

Elisha B. Hubbard, 

Frank H. Wood, . 

Sanford C. Bond, 



INSPECTORS. 



Gordon M. Fisk, 
Gilbert A. Smith, 
Samuel Banister, 
J. M. Rice, . 



$33,125 00 


. 11,500 


00 


400 


00 


600 


00 


500 00 


208 00 


300 


00 


156 


00 


156 


00 


156 


00 


182 


00 


156 


00 


156 


00 


575 


00 


480 


00 


300 00 


312 


00 


300 00 


250 00 


216 


00 


216 00 


200 00 


$7,319 00 


$100 00 


100 00 


52 


24 


47 


76 



$300 00 



1861.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 7 

Full particulars in regard to expenditures and management 
of the almshouse during the year may be found in the Super- 
intendent's report, following our own. 

We take pleasure in commending the Superintendent and 
subordinate officers for their faithfulness in the discharge of 
duties committed to their care ; and with grateful acknowledg- 
ment for blessings of the past, we enter upon the duties of 
another year, relying upon the favor of Him who hath said — 
" Thou shalt open thy hand wide unto thy brother, to thy poor, 
and to thy needy." 

GORDON M. FISK, 
GILBERT A. SMITH, 
J. MARCUS RICE, 

Inspectors. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
September 30, 1861. 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — I respectfully submit the following report for 
the year ending September 30, 1861 : 

The number in the institution at the date of last report, 

October 1, 1860, 519 

The number admitted since, including seventeen born in 

the institution, 2,085 



Whole number supported since 


last 


report, 


. 2,6C 


Number discharged and deserted, 


• 




1,866 


indentured and on trial, . 


. 


. 


89 


died, .... 


. 


. 


53 


Remaining, October 1, 1861 : 








Men, 




68 




Women, 


. 


92 




Boys under 15 years of age, . 


. 


29T 


* 


Girls under 15 years of age, . 


. 


139 




Total, .... 


. 




596 



2,604 



Average number supported through the year, 590. 
Number of paupers sent out of the State, 186. 



Persons admitted this year were born in 




Massachusetts, 


. 382 


Maine, . . . ... 


17 


New Hampshire, 


11 


Vermont, . . . . . 


20 


Connecticut, 


35 



1861.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



Rhode Island, 
New York, 
Other States, . 
Ireland, 
England, 
Germany, 
Scotland, 
British Provinces, 
France, . 
Other countries, 
Unknown, 



18 
109 

65 

824 

296 

42 

81 

132 

10 

19 

24 

2,085 



Towns and Counties in Massachusetts from which Paupers have 

been received. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 


HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 


Adams, ...... 9 


Amherst, 3 


Alford, . 






2 


Belchertown, 








6 


Cheshire, . 






1 


Chesterfield, 








1 


Dalton, 






2 


Cummington, 








1 


Great Barrington, 






2 


Easthampton, 








4 


Hinsdale, . 






3 


Enfield, . 








2 


Lanesborough, . 
Lee, . 






1 
1 


Granby, . 
Middlefield, 








1 
2 


New Marlborough, 






1 


Northampton, 








10 


Pittsfield, . 






. 18 


Pelham, . 








1 


Sheffield, . 






1 


South Hadley, 








1 


Washington, 






3 


Ware, 








. 19 


Williamstown, . 






2 


Williamsburg, 








2 


West Stockbridge, . 






4 


Worthington, 








3 


50 


56 




HAMPDEN COUNTY. 


FRANKLIN COUNTY. 




Buckland, .... 10 


Brimfield, . 








3 


Conway, . 








2 


Blandford, 








3 


Deerfield, . 








6 


Chester, . 








3 


Gill, . 








1 


Chicopee, . 








49 


Greenfield, 








5 


Granville, 








1 


New Salem, 








8 


Holyoke, . 








22 


Rowe, 








2 


Longmeadow, 








1 


Sunderland, 








1 


Ludlow, . 








1 





Monson, . 








. 13 


35 


Palmer,* . 








1,685 



* Nearly all travelling paupers. 



10 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



Springfield, . . . . 99 


Sturbridge, . . . . 2 


Tolland, . 






8 


Spencer, . 






10 


Westfield, 






8 


Sutton, 






3 


West Springfield, 
Wilbraham, 






8 
8 


Upton, 
Uxbridge, 






1 
1 


1,612 


Phillipston, 
Webster, . 






2 
5 


WORCESTER 

Brookfield, 
Dudley, . 
Gardner, . 
Grafton, . 


cou* 


[TY. 


2 

1 

. 16 

3 


Worcester, 
Westminster, . 
West Springfield, 
Westborough, . 
Warren, . 






56 
4 
1 
3 

8 


Fitchburg, 






9 


242 


Hardwick, 
Holden, . 






3 
17 


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Boston, ..... 5 


Leicester, . 






1 


Chelsea, . . . . . 3 


Milford, . 






40 


8 

Bridge water State Almshouse, . 52 


Millbury, . 
North Brookfield, 






32 
6 


Ebrthbridge, 
Oxford, . 






2 
1 


Tewksbury State Almshouse, . . 9 
Rainsford Island, . . 1 


Rutland, . 






1 


Transient, .... 3 


Southbridge, 






12 


Born in the house, ... 17 



Of the number received, 280 came into the State in 1860, and 
367 in 1861 ; and of 2,085 received during the year, all but 
about 130 are of foreign birth and parentage. 

Expenditures from October 1, 1860, to October 1, 1861 : 



Paid for flour, .... 




• • 


$4,565 50 


beef and pork, 






. 4,201 24 


fish, 






26.5 48 


milk, 






3,312 30 


fruit and vegetables, 






91 03 


potatoes, . 






251 22 


beans, 






277 47 


grain, 






738 08 


dry goods and bedding, . 






2,565 14 


hats and caps, . 






143 75 


boots, shoes and leather, . 






768 67 


furniture, 






54 55 


brooms, mops and brushes, 




154 67 


hardware and cutlery, 






36 95 



1861.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



11 



Paid for books, stationery and printing, 
tin and wooden ware, 
stoves and fixtures, 
fuel and lights, 
sundry groceries, 
tobacco, . 
vinegar, . 
farm stock, 
fanning mill, . 

farming implements and seeds, 
poultry and eggs, 
straw, 

medical supplies, 
postage, . 
crockery, 
crackers, . 
malt, 
baskets, . 

transportation of paupers, 
repairs and improvements, 
lime, cement, sand and brick, 
blacksmithing, 
railroad freight, 

express and telegraph companies, 
soap, 

salaries, . 
steam pump, 
sleigh, 
harnesses, 
consultation, 
expenses, 
. ' powder, . 

advertising homes wanted for children, 
invoicing State property, 
labor of sundry persons, 
sundries, . 

Inspectors' salaries, . 
" expenses, 



$112 or 


59 14 


58 53 


3,270 14 


1,857 78 


99 21 


33 90 


159 00 


13 00 


281 54 


147 18 


123 41 


186 70 


56 27 


95 14 


57 78 


6 38 


22 33 


144 72 


837 91 


71 07 


91 78 


246 45 


16 29 


477 40 


7,431 34 


300 00 


32 00 


103 00 


35 00 


213 14 


17 50 


19 75 


54 00 


41 50 


30 93 



$34,229 33 
300 00 
273 88 



$34,803 21 



$57 86 

390 00 

34,355 35 


(34,803 21 


K 


$144 72 

837 91 

71 07 

54 00 




447 86 


$1,555 56 





12 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

Cr. by cash, of towns and individuals, 

for support of paupers, 
Cr. by cash, for articles sold, 
Cr. by cash, of State Treasurer, . 

Total expenditures for the year, 

From this deduct — 

Transportation of paupers, . 

Eepairs and improvements, . 

Lime, cement, sand and brick, 

Invoicing State property, 

Cash received for articles sold, and sup- 
port of paupers, .... 

Total amount of running expenses, . .$33,247 65 

The amount of expenditures for nine months, com- 
mencing January 1, 1861, and ending September 
30, 1861, is $24,576 00 

Inspectors' salaries, 225 00 

" expenses, . . . . . .' 208 78 

$25,009 78 

Cr. by cash, for articles sold, and sup- 
port of paupers, . . . $302 72 
Cr. by cash, of State Treasurer, . . 24,707 06 

$25,009 78 

Balance remaining of the appropriation for the year 
1861, $10,292 94 

The amount of inventory September 30, 1860, was . $32,262 41 
Total amount of cash received from State Treasurer 

from October 1, 1860, to October 1, 1861, . . 34.355 35 



$66,617 76 



From this amount should be deducted, as per invoice 
September 30, 1861 : 

Live stock on the farm, .... $2,701 25 
Produce of the farm on hand, . . 3,413 56 
Carriages and agricultural implements, . 2,234 47 



1861.] 



PUBLIC ^DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



13 



Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 


$2,745 00 


Beds and bedding in the inmates' depart- 




ment, ...... 


6,701 12 


Other furniture in the inmates' depart- 




ment, including apparatus for fire de- 




partment, 


3,815 82 


Personal property in the Superintendent's 




department, . . . .. . 


2,691 64 


Keady-made clothing, . 


3,183 94 


Dry goods, 


703 15 


Provisions and groceries, 


1,316 72 


Drugs and medicine, . 


715 25 


Fuel, 


2,551 25 


Library, 


351 83 


For repairs and improvements, including 




lime, cement, sand and brick, 


908 98 


For transportation of paupers, 


144 72 


For invoicing State property, . 


54 00 


For consultation, . 


35 00 


For cash received for articles sold, and 




support of paupers, . 


447 86 


Cash on hand, 


409 52 




<fcQ* IOC AQ 




■ ypou yXAU \jo 



Making the net sum for the support of inmates, . $31,492 68 
Being $53.39 for each pauper one year, or $1.02J 
per week. 



ESTIMATED PRODUCE OP THE FARM. 




39 pigs sold, $126 50 


3,746 pounds pork, at 10 cents, 






374 60 


3,320 pounds beef, at 8 cents, 






265 60 


1,150 pounds veal, at 10 cents, 






115 00 


100 tons hay, at $12, . 






1,200 00 


2 " cornstalks, at $6, . 






12 00 


3i " oats, at $12, . 






42 00 


2 " rye, at $15, . 






30 00 


8 " winter squashes, at $15, 






120 00 


1 ton summer squashes, . 






15 00 


900 pounds flax, . 






15 00 


1 acre corn fodder, . 






25 00 



14 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



1,000 bushels potatoes, at 45 cents, 
85 " onions, at 75 cents, . 
2,200 " carrots, at 25 cents, . 
65 " corn, at $1, 
40 " green corn, at 37J cents, 
201 " peas, at $1.25, . 
340 " beets, at 25 cents, . 
60 " parsnips, at 25 cents, 
435 " turnips, at 25 cents, 
35 " tomatoes, at 25 cents, 
50 " cucumbers, at 25 cents, 
10 " apples, at 50 cents, 
4 loads pumpkins, at $1.50, 
4,000 heads cabbage, at 4 cents, 
5,378 gallons milk, at 12-|- cents, 
lettuce, 



1450 00 


63 


75 


550 


00 


65 


00 


15 00 


25 


62 


82 


50 


15 


00 


108 37 


8 


38 


12 


50 





00 


6 


00 


160 


00 


672 25 


10 


00 


$4,590 07 



The events of another year are added to the annals of this 
institution. These events, so full of interest as the occurrences 
of such an institution necessarily must be, have been spread in 
their details before the Board from time to time, and have been 
witnessed by you, to a great extent, in the frequent visits 
belonging to your official duties. These events are so made up 
of personal matters, and so interwoven with the joys and sorrows 
of those who have here sought assistance, that an account of 
their incidents, however interesting, would be a violation of the 
confidence existing between the Superintendent and his charge. 
Without any betrayal of trust, however, a few general facts can 
be given, and suggestions offered, which may be of service to the 
institution, and beneficial to the public. 

The management of the farm is a subject of increasing interest. 
It is a hard, rough farm, abounding with stones, stumps, and 
waste land. It is too much to expect a rapid subduing of its 
unproductive portions, for our circumstances do not permit it. 
None are brought here who can support themselves elsewhere, 
consequently they are poor helpers. Still, we cannot but con- 
gratulate ourselves that so much is done, rather than so little. 
In a reasonable length of time we shall hope to make the farm 



1861.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 15 

very productive.* Some boggy and very wet lands, which were 
formerly actually worthless, so far as regards the production of 
a crop, have for a year or two past paid the interest of more 
than five hundred dollars per acre. A portion of this land, 
reclaimed within three years, has produced the past season (at 
two cuttings) nearly four tons of good hay to the acre. Some 
six to eight acres, which were nearly unproductive three years 
ago, will be seeded the coming season, greatly increasing the 
growth of grass and thereby contribute considerably towards 
supplying the institution with milk. It will be seen by the 
experienced and practical farmer that these permanent improve- 
ments which we have been making for the last three years, 
though not appreciated perhaps by the captious and casual 
observer, have been made to pay. The long lines of heavy stone 
wall, both under and above ground, for drains and fences, and 
the hundreds upon hundreds of stumps extracted during the 
year, show the patience and great amount of labor necessary in 
order to prepare for a remunerative and intelligent cultivation. 
Our success in subduing the land, the annual increase of crops, 
the ability to keep a larger herd of cows, and the pleasure of 
seeing a general improvement, stimulates to more vigorous effort, 
and encourages to greater diligence in agriculture. 

The great inconvenience of not having a coal-house is now 
being remedied. I shall hope, during the autumn and winter, 
without any expense to the State, to be able to complete this 
indispensable appendage. 

The necessity of having all the buildings well painted is 
becoming very urgent. I cannot but think it poor economy to 
allow them to suffer for the want of timely repairs. A small 
appropriation for this specific purpose is greatly needed, and I 
would respectfully recommend that it receive early attention. 

The sanitary condition of the institution receives constant 
and unremitting watchfulness and care. A good degree of 
health has been enjoyed throughout the year. No epidemic has 

* You will see, gentlemen, by reference to my annual report of 1858, 
that the estimated value of farm products that year was $3,474.50 : this 
year the estimated value is $4,590.07 ; making an increase of value in three 
years of $1,115.57 ; thus giving unquestioned evidence of the advancing steps 
of improvement, and also showing the greatly enlarged productive capacities 
of the farm. 



16 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

prevailed. The number of deaths has been fifty-three. Consid- 
ering the character and number of inmates, and the condition 
in which many of them are sent to the almshouse, the bill of 
mortality is certainly not very large. A wholesome diet, clean- 
liness, ventilations, seasonable hours, abstinence from habits 
which enfeeble the body and debase the mind, and a discipline 
subjecting to order and subordination — these all contribute their 
share in giving health, sobriety, and comfort to the recipients of 
this noble charity. 

The moral and religious influences exerted here, under all the 
circumstances, especially upon the young, are most happy and 
salutary. A proper regard for the Sabbath is always observed 
in attendance upon public worship and the Sabbath school, and 
in the universal quiet and propriety of conduct so suitable to 
this sacred day. Evening prayers are invariably attended in the 
Chapel by all the children of a suitable age, immediately before 
retiring for the night. To engage in these evening devotions 
cannot but incline their hearts to reverence and to love. Our 
schools, I am happy to say, have continued to prosper. The 
average attendance during the year has been three hundred and 
twenty-five. No where else in the Commonwealth, I venture to 
say, can there be found so large and so interesting an assemblage 
of this class of children as is here gathered together. 

There have been indentured, adopted, and put out on trial, 
for the past year, eighty-nine. This number would have very 
much increased had the times been more favorable. 

I would most respectfully recommend and earnestly urge the 
importance of classification. I would place in one of the three 
institutions all the children five years of age and upwards, and 
in the other two all the adults, only retaining in the former a 
sufficient number for domestic purposes. It is impossible to 
educate properly these pauper children, and bring them under 
good and healthful influences, unless separated from the adults. 
The children are the only hopeful and promising class of inmates, 
and ought to be removed far away from the sight or hearing of 
the profane and profligate, so as not to be in the least endangered 
by their evil examples, either in word or deed ; and thus isolated, 
they should be watched over and instructed with all the kindness 
and care which their peculiar circumstances demand. The 
separation of the child from the vicious and vile is ever upper- 



1861.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 17 

most in the mind of the affectionate, watchful and anxious 
parent. Should the State be less solicitous for the welfare of 
her children ? Whatever else is sufferable, whatever else the 
heart is called to endure, who can bear a ruined child ? 

Gentlemen, I would not forget to acknowledge my obligations 
for your assistance in the discharge of varied and constant 
responsibilities. May the same kind Providence which has 
safely conducted us through the duties of the past, graciously 
strengthen our hands for the work that is before us in the 
future. 

JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jr., 

Superintendent. 

Monson State Almshouse, 
October 1, 1861. 



18 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S KEPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson 



Gentlemen., — The following report will show you the condi- 
tion of the medical department of this institution, for the year 
ending September 30, 1861. 



Number remaining in hospital, September 30, 1860, 
admitted during year, 
births, 
deaths, 
discharged, 
remaining in hospital, 



60 

500 
18 
53 

431 
59 



Diseases which have been treated, and the number in each 
disease : 



Abscess, . 
Amenorrhea, . 






18 

2 


Insanity, . 
Luxation Humerus, 








Anasarca, . 






2 


Femur, 








Ascites, 






1 


Micturition, 








Bronchitis, 






1 


Cerebral Effusion, 








Burn, 






4 


Concussion, 








Cancrum Oris, . 






6 


Coup de Soliel, 








Caries, 
Chilblains, 
Cholera Infantum, 






4 

. 28 

7 


Croup, 

Cynanche Tonsillitis, 
Parotidaej 


h 




2 
6 
3 


Morbus, 
Hematemesis, . 






, 10 
1 


Debility, . 
Diarrhoea, . 






13 

29 


Hysteria, . 
Ileus, 

Jaundice, . 
Influenza, . 






2 
1 

1 

7 


Dementia, 
Dysentery, 
Dyspepsia, 
Entozoa, . 






1 
5 
2 

8 


Iretis, 






1 


Eczema, . 






4 


Irritation of Stomach 


> 




21 


Epilepsy, . 






6 



1861.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



19 



Felon, 








2 


Pemphigus, 


1 


Fever, Simple, . 






22 


Periostitis, * 


1 


Bilious, . 






8 


Pleurisy, .... 


4 


Typhoid, 






5 


Purpura Hemorrhagica, . 


1 


Puerperal, 






1 


Phthisis, .... 


11 


Scarlet, 






2 


Pneumonia, 


11 


Fistula in Ano, 






1 


Rheumatism, . . 


14 


Fracture, Leg, . 






9 


Scabies, .... 


44 


Thigh, 






2 


Syphilis, Primary, 


2 


Patella, 






1 


Secondary, 


5 


Spine, 






1 


Schirrhus, 


2 


Fore Arm, 






1 


Sprain, .... 


10 


Frostbite, . 






1 


Spinal Irritation, 


8 


Gonorrhoea, 








4 


Scrofula, .... 


1 


Marasmus, 








1 


Tinea Capitis, . 


2 


Neuralgia, 








7 


Ulcer, .... 


6 


Oedema, . 








1 


Urticaria, .... 


4 


Ophthalmia, 








73 


Wounds, Incised, 


2 


Otitis, 








1 


Contused, . 


3 


Paralysis, . 








1 


Gunpowder, 


2 


Parturition, 








. 18 


by Boar, . 


1 



The foregoing does not include many cases that have received 
medical aid without admission to the hospital. 

Causes of Death. 



Anasarca, .... 


2 


Epilepsy, . ft . 






. 2 


Apoplexy, .... 


1 


Fever, Typhoid, 






1 


Asthma, .... 


1 


Puerperal, 






1 


Cancer, * 


1 


Hydrocephalus, . 






2 


Cholera Infantum, 


6 


Influenza, . 






1 


Convulsions, 


1 


Marasmus, . 






1 


Coup de Soliel, . 


1 


Pneumonia, 






3 


Cynanche Tonsillaris, 


1 


Phthisis, 






10 


Debility, 


14 


Scrofula, . 






1 


Dysentery, .... 


. 1 


Syncope, . 






1 



It is certainly a subject of congratulation that we have 
escaped the visitation of any of those epidemics that sometimes 
make such fearful ravages in crowded institutions like this. 

The two cases of scarlatina which are recorded as occurring 
during the year, did not originate here. They were brought 
in from an infected district during the progress of the disease, 
and happily it was not communicated to any of the inmates here. 

The number of admissions to the hospital during the past 



20 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

year but slightly exceeds those of the preceding year, being 
500 to 490, while the number of deaths has been 53 against 45 
the year before. But when we take into consideration that 
during the year ending September 30, 1860, there were 206 
cases of opthalmia admitted into the hospital, and during the 
past year only 73, it will be seen that the number of diseases 
treated which threaten life has been much greater, and the 
percentage of deaths much less the past year than during 
the preceding one. 

The number of deaths the past year has been largely 
increased, as it undoubtedly has been to a greater or less 
extent during preceding years, by foundlings deserted by their 
parents at a tender age, and brought in here in a state of 
exhaustion, and who die from the effect of exposure or con- 
genital disease, by persons sent in here to die frequently in the 
last stages of some incurable disease, and by aged people whose 
sands of life have almost run out, and whose deaths have, 
in some instances, been undoubtedly hastened by shaking their 
few running sands in removing them hither. Of the eighteen 
births that have occurred during the year, one was stillborn. 

I wish to acknowledge my obligations to Miss Reed, the 
faithful and intelligent nurse, for her judicious and unremitting 
care of the sick committed to her charge. 

Firmly relying upon Divine Providence, with grateful recol- 
lections of the past, and an humble hope for the future, I 
remain, 

Respectfully yours, 

J. D. NICHOLS, Physician. 

Monson, October 1, 1861. 



1861.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 21 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse at Monson : 

Gentlemen, — During the past year I have preached in the 
Chapel on all the Sabbath mornings but three. On two of those 
I procured preaching by exchanges. On one I was sick, and a 
sermon was read by the Superintendent. There have commonly 
been at the Sabbath morning meeting about 125 adult inmates, 
and somewhat over 300 children. These meetings have also 
been attended by most of the officers of the institution. I have 
aimed to present scriptural truth in language so plain that it 
might be understood by adult persons, though illiterate, and by 
the older children. Serious attention has appeared to be given 
to preaching, yet there has not been evidence of conversions, as 
in some former years. We have usually had singing at each 
Sabbath morning meeting ; once by the children and twice by a 
choir consisting of several of the officers. Many of the children 
manifest a remarkable aptitude for learning tunes ; and they sing, 
in quite an interesting manner, the sacred songs commencing, 
" Who shall sing, if not the children ? " " This is the day when 
Christ arose ;" " How sweet is the Sabbath !" " Pleasant is the 
Sabbath bell ;" " How shall the young secure their hearts ? " 
" When little Samuel woke ;"■ " I think when I read that sweet 
story of old ; " "I want to be like Jesus ;" " Come, children, 
hail the Prince of Peace ; " " Around the throne of God in 
Heaven ;" and a variety of others. 

There have constantly been religious services Sabbath after- 
noons, for the benefit of the inmates, conducted by our worthy 
Superintendent. The children have been instructed as a Sabbath 
school, every Sabbath in the year, with but one or two exceptions. 
For a considerable part of the year several of the officers have met, 
Sabbath evenings, to attend to portions of Scripture, as a Bible 



22 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. '61. 

class. Evening worship has been regularly maintained in the 
Chapel as formerly. There has been, through the year, a weekly 
prayer-meeting, on Friday evenings, in the men's hospital, in 
which I have been assisted by a number of the inmates. Among 
the adult inmates who have spent a considerable part or the 
whole of the year in the institution, there are some whom I 
regard as true Christians ; while not a few, I fear, may be said 
to be " far from righteousness." The children generally appear 
to be as moral in their conduct as most children in other situa- 
tions ; yet the morals of some are doubtless injured by the bad 
examples which they witness in older persons. I have visited 
the sick when I have considered it my duty to do so, and when 
a death has occurred, I have, in almost every instance, offered 
a prayer with reference to it. A few weeks since my health 
was so feeble that I thought it might be expedient for me to 
resign my office at the close of this month ; but I now find 
myself so far restored that I am willing to officiate a while 
longer, if it is agreeable to your wishes. 

Yours, gentlemen, with much respect, 

EBENEZER B. WRIGHT, Chaplain. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
September 30, 1861. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 30. 

NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



INSPECTORS 



STATE ALMSHOUSE, 



^ T MONSON 



OCTOBER, 1862. 



BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER, STATE PRINTERS; 
No. 4 Spring Lane. 

18 62. 



€oinmont»ealt!) of iltaasat^etiB. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor, and the Honorable Council : 

The year closing with the 30th of September, 1862, finds the 
Monson State Almshouse in as promising condition as it has 
been at the time of making any previous Annual Report. Its 
general management has been the same, and the results have 
not differed materially from those in past years. 

The number of inmates constantly supported through the 
year has been larger than last year. There have been more 
women and children and less men. Stragglers, and persons 
seeking temporary shelter have been few, while male help, 
obtained from inmates, has not averaged the labor of one good 
man. 

The number of inmates in the almshouse, at the time of 

making our last Annual Report, October 1, 1861, was 596 

Admitted and born during the year, .... 1,054 

Discharged, indentured, deserted and died, . . . 1,054 

Remaining, September 30, 1862, 596 

Average number supported during the year, . . . 649 

Increase over the average number supported last year, . 59 

Cost of supporting each inmate per week, 98 J- cents. 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

The inmates at present in the institution are divided as 
follows : 

Men, 48 

Women, 103 

Boys, . .292 

Girls, .153 

At the time of making our last Report, workmen were putting 
in a new boiler, and building a house for the same, under a 
special appropriation made by the legislature. The expense 
amounted to twelve hundred and eighty-five dollars ninety-eight 
cents, (11,285.98,) exceeding the appropriation eighty-five dol- 
lars and ninety-eight cents (185.98). The latter amount was 
paid from the regular appropriation for current expenses. The 
actual cost of the boiler was eight hundred dollars, ($800,) the 
steam pipes, building and fixtures costing four hundred and 
eighty-five dollars ninety-eight cents ($485.98.) 

The farm has been highly productive, yielding one hundred 
and seven tons of hay, besides affording pasturage to twenty- 
eight head of stock, and furnishing a large quantity of vegeta- 
bles. Improvements have been constantly going on upon the 
farm, as in years previous. 

The buildings have all been thoroughly painted on the out- 
side, at an expense of five hundred and sixty-one dollars ninety- 
three cents ($561.93.) 

The sanitary condition of inmates is exhibited in the Phy- 
sician's Report, which accompanies our own. Ophthalmia and 
measles have prevailed to considerable extent among the 
children, but no fatal epidemic has visited the institution. 

Number admitted to the hospital during the year, . . 645 

Discharged, 589 

Number of births, ........ 21 

Deaths, 61 

The report of the Chaplain, which we attach to our own, 
gives a comprehensive history of his labors for the moral and 
spiritual welfare of the inmates. That his efforts have been 



1862.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 5 

attended with a fair degree of success, we have abundant 
evidence. 

Three schools have been kept as usual, by four teachers, with 
an average attendance of three hundred and twenty children. 
Most of these are quite small, and can be taught only the simple 
elements of education. In one of the schools, however, arith- 
metic and geography are pursued with good success. 

One hundred and fifty-two children have been transferred 
from the Tewksbury and Bridgewater Almshouses to this insti- 
tution during the year — ninety from Tewksbury, and sixty-two 
from Bridgewater. The object of transferring children from 
the other almshouses to this, we have supposed to be for the 
purpose of furnishing them better school facilities, and having 
good homes found for them ; but some of those transferred from 
the Tewksbury Almshouse cannot be much benefited by schools, 
and can never be indentured. 

The number of children indentured and put out on trial 
during the year is one hundred and eight. Several of those 
indentured in years past have enlisted into the armies of the 
Government, and their guardians have taken others to fill their 
places. 

The business of binding out children grows upon the institu- 
tion every year. Since the opening of the almshouse, six hun- 
dred and twenty-two children have been furnished with homes 
among the farmers and mechanics of New England. Four 
hundred and fifty-four of this number have been indentured 
since October 1, 1858. The utmost care is exercised in ascer- 
taining the character of homes to which children are to be 
bound, before they are allowed to go from the charge of the 
Superintendent. Then they remain one month on trial before 
the indentures are signed by the Inspectors and Guardians. As 
might be expected, occasional difficulties arise which render it 
necessary to take children back, but such instances arc few in 
comparison to the number indentured. We have the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that many of those indentured in the early 
history of the institution have grown up respectable young men 
and women, while many others are promising equally well. 

While the average number of inmates supported has been 
larger than last year, the expenses have been seven hundred and 
eighty-six dollars seventy cents (1786.70) less. In connection 



6 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



with this abbreviation of expenses, it should be borne in mind 
that the extra cost of painting the buildings is included, and 
that many articles of consumption have greatly advanced over 
the prices of last year. 

This economy in finances is due to the good judgment, expe- 
rience, and systematical management of the Superintendent in 
all matters relating to his charge. 

The inventory shows a decrease from that of last year in the 
value of property in and about the buildings. This must 
necessarily be the case in regard to furniture and many other 
articles, from year to year, until their place is supplied by new. 
The following is a correct inventory of the property which the 
statutes require us to appraise. 



INVENTORY. 

Live stock on the farm, . . . 

Produce of the farm on hand, 
Carriages and agricultural implements, 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . 
Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 
Other furniture in inmates' department, including 

apparatus for extinguishing fire, 
Personal property in Superintendent's department, 
Ready-made clothing, . 
Dry goods, . 
Provisions and groceries, 
Drugs and medicines, . 
Fuel, .... 
Library, 



OFFICERS AND THEIR SALARIES. 

John M. Brewster, Jr., M. D., Superintendent, 
Mrs. C. S. Brewster, Matron, . . 
Rev. Ebenezer B. Wright, Chaplain, 
Joseph D. Nichols, M. D., Physician, 
Joseph H. Brewster, Clerk and Assist. SupH, 
Edwin N. Montague, Teacher , and charge of boys in 
play-yard, ........ 



$2,489 50 


3,471 31 


2,140 00 


3,461 00 


6,232 04 


3,026 51 


2,503 23 


2,113 50 


599 77 


1,065 72 


695 75 


3,147 50 


331 62 


$31,277 45 


. $1,200 00 


300 00 


400 00 


600 00 


. 500 00 



300 00 



1862.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



Lucy M. Colton, Teacher, 

Lois Bliss, Teacher, 

Mattie A. Browning, Teacher, 

Elizabeth A. Reid, Nurse, 

Sarah S. Nichols, Assist. Matron, 

Maria M. Lewis, Assist. Matron, 

Eliza S. Norton, Seamstress, . 

Willard J. Clark, Cook in inmates' department, and 

charge of fire apparatus, water-pipes and stoves, 
John N. Lacy, Engineer and Machinist, 
Charles Gates, Baker, . 
George Fisherdick, Farmer, 
Charles Adams, Farmer, 
Frank H. Wood, Coachman, 
Lester B. Gunn, Watchman, 
Elisha B. Hubbard, Supervisor of Male and Laun 

dry departments, 



. $156 00 


156 


00 


156 


00 


208 


00 


156 


00 


156 00 


. ' 156 

7 


00 


. 450 00 


480 00 


312 


00 


. 325 


00 


250 


00 


216 


00 


200 


00 


.' 325 


00 



17,002 00 



The officers number two less than last year, and there is also 
a diminution of three hundred and seventeen dollars ($317) in 
salaries. 



Gordon M. Fisk, 
Gilbert A. Smith, 
George Chandler, 



inspectors' salaries. 



$160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

$480 00 



For a detailed account of all expenditures, and a more minute 
history of the operations of the almshouse, we refer you to the 
Superintendent's report, which follows our own. 

Appreciating the manifold cares and perplexities of the 
Superintendent, we cordially bear testimony to his faithfulness 
and fidelity in the discharge of his duties, and in the successful 
management of the institution. The subordinate officers have 
also performed their duties in a satisfactory manner. 



8 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

In closing, we would not be unmindful of the Divine favor 
which has seemed to attend the philanthropic efforts of the 
Commonwealth in its dispensation of charity through its ser- 
vants in this institution — shielding its inmates from epidemic, 
unusual mortality and disaster. Relying upon the same Benefi- 
cence, we are hopeful of continued blessings and prosperity. 

GORDON M. FISK, 
GILBERT A. SMITH, 
GEORGE CHANDLER, 

Inspectors. 

State Almshouse, Monson, ) 
October 1, 1862. J 



1862.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — In submitting the Ninth Annual Report, I have 
the honor to present the following statements, with the accom- 
panying remarks upon the present condition of this institution : 



The number in the institution at the date of last report, 

October 1, 1861, 596 

The number admitted since, including eighteen born in 



LllO ilXOtlUUtlUll, .... 


report, 


. 


• 


X)\JU^± 


Whole number supported since last 


1,650 


Number discharged and deserted, 






993 




died, .... 


. 


. 


61 




Remaining, October 1, 1862 : 










Men, 




. 48 






Women, ..... 


. 


. 103 






Boys under 15 years of age, 


. 


. 292 






Girls under 15 years of age, 


• 


. 153 






Total, . 


. 


. 


596 





1,650 

Of the number discharged, 108 are children indentured and 
on trial. 

Average number supported through the year, 649. 
Number of paupers sent out of the State, 112. 



ersons admitted this year were born in 




Massachusetts, .... 


369 


Maine, ....... 


12 


New Hampshire, 


9 


Vermont, / 


13 


Connecticut, ...... 


22 


Rhode Island, 

2 


8 



10 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



New York, 












35 


Other States, . 












25 


Ireland, . 












, 363 


England, 












74 


Germany, 












15 


Scotland, 












40 


British Provinces, 












44 


France, . 












3 


Other countries, 












6 


Unknown, 












16 



1,054 

Towns and Counties in Massachusetts from which Paupers 
have been received. 
Hadley, . 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 



Adams. 

Becket 

Clarkst 

Great Barrington, 

Hancock, . 

Lee, . 

Lenox, 

Otis, . 

Peru, 

Pittsfield, . 

Sandisfield, 

Sheffield, . 

Washington, 

Williamstown, . 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Conway, .... 
Deerfield, .... 
Erving, .... 
Leyden, .... 
Northfield, . . 
Kowe, .... 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 

Amherst, . 
Belchertown, 
Easthampton, 
Enfield, . 
Granby, . 



43 

3 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 



Huntington, 
Northampton, 
Prescott, . 
South Hadley, 
Ware, 
Worthington, 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 

Agawam, . 
Brimfield, . 
Chester, . 
Chicopee, . 
Granville, . 
Holyoke, . 
Holland, . 
Longmeadow, 
Monson, . 
Palmer * . 
Russell, 
Southwick, 
Springfield, 
West Springfield, 
Westfield, . 
Wilbraham, 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 



Athol, 
Barre, 



43 



4 

1 
33 

1 
21 

o 

6 

7 

438 

1 

1 

82 



616 

1 
3 



* Nearly all travelling paupers. 



1862.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



11 



Bolton, 






1 


Sutton, 


3 


Charlton, . 






1 


Warren, . 


8 


Fitchburg, 






6 


Webster, . 


1 


Gardner, . 






6 


West Brookfield, 


2 


Leicester, . 






1 


Westminster, 


. . . 4 


Milford, . 






14 


Westborough, . 


2 


Millbury, . 






4 


Worcester, 


. 56 


New Braintree, 






1 







North Brookfield, 






2 




157 










SUFFOLK COUNT 


Oxford, . 






8 


Boston, 


.14 


Paxton, 






1 






Shrewsbury, 






1 


Bridgewater State Almshouse, . 62 


Southbridge, 






17 


Tewksbury State Almshouse, . 90 


Spencer, . 






. 13 


Transient, 


2 


Sturbridge, 






1 


Born in the house, . 


. 18 



Of the number received, 80 came into the State in 1861, and 
42 in 1862 ; and of the 1,054 received during the year, all but 
about 35 are of foreign birth and parentage. 



Expenditures from October 1, 1861, to October 1, 1862 : 


Paid for flour, . $4,854 65 


beef and pork, 






3,404 92 


fish, . . . . 






221 62 


milk, ..... 






3,205 57 


fruit and vegetables, 






133 86 


potatoes, 






189 01 


beans,. . ... 






258 94 


grain, .... 






705 37 


dry goods and bedding, . 






2,586 74 


hats and caps, 






156 00 


boots, shoes and leather, 






729 75 


furniture, 






64 12 


brooms, mops and brushes, 






129 25 


hardware and cutlery, . 






58 07 


books, stationery and printing. 






76 49 


tin and wooden ware, 






50 76 


fuel and lights, 






. 3,351 89 


stoves and fixtures, 

' 






83 39 


tobacco, snuff and pipes, 






87 91 


vinegar, 






16 50 


sundry groceries, 






2,102 16 


farm stock, 






333 00 



12 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Paid for farming implements and seeds, 


8156 13 


medical supplies .... 


212 87 


soap, 


406 01 


postage, 


50 77 


biacksmithing, .... 


80 40 


poultry and eggs, .... 


100 87 


crockery, 


100 09 


crackers, . 


65 82 


straw, ...... 


98 52 


labor of sundry persons, 


241 51 


hops and malt, .... 


8 67 


sawing lumber, .... 


15 02 


extra labor on farm, 


102 55 


advertising homes wanted for children, 


3 50 


inspectors towards the completion of ne\* 


r 


steam-boiler, 


85 98 


powder, 


21 50 


invoicing State property, for 1861, . 


54 50 


repairs and improvements, 


1,086 11 


lime, cement, sand and brick, 


89 96 


transportation of paupers, 


55 15 


railroad freight, .... 


258 91 


express and telegraph companies, . 


28 80 


pasturing, 


37 00 


expenses, 


200 71 


salaries, ...... 


. 7,136 76 


consultation, 


3 00 


sundries, ..... 


39 10 




$33,540 21 



Inspectors' salaries to June 1, 1862, 

under old law, $200 00 

Inspectors' expenses to June 1, 1862, 

under old law, . . . . 116 30 

Inspectors' salaries from June 1, 1862, 

under new law 160 00 



476 30 



$34,016 51 



1862.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



13 



Ob. 

By cash, of towns and individuals, for 

support of paupers, . . . . $5 86 

By cash, for articles sold, . . . 425 00 

By cash, of State Treasurer, . . 33,585 63 

Total expenditures for the year, 



134,016 51 



From this deduct — 
Transportation of paupers, . 
Repairs and improvements, . 
Lime, cement, sand and brick, 
Invoicing State property for 1861, 
Cash received for articles sold, and sup 

port of paupers, 



$55 15 

1,086 11 

89 96 

54 50 



430 86 



Total amount of running expenses, . 

The amount of expenditures for nine months, com- 
mencing January 1, 1862, and ending September 
30, 1862, is 

Inspectors' salaries to June 1, 1862, 

under old law, $125 01 

Inspectors' expenses to June 1, 1862, 

under old law, 67 37 

Inspectors' salaries from June 1, 1862, 

under new law, .... 159 99 



$1,716 58 
$32,299 93 



$23,423 20 



352 37 



$23,775 57 



Cr. 
By cash for articles sold, and support 

of paupers, $430 86 

By cash of State Treasurer, . . . 23,344 71 



Balance remaining of the appropriation for the year 

1862, ... . . ' . 

The amount of inventory September 30, 1861, was 
Total amount of cash received from State Treasurer 
from October 1, 1861, to October 1, 1862, . 



$23,775 57 

$12,224 43 
$33,125 00 

33,585 63 



$66,710 65 



14 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



as per iri- 

12,489 50 
3,471 31 
2,140 00 
3,461 00 

6,232 04 



3,026 51 



From this amount should be deducted 

voice, September 30, 1862 : 
Live stock on the farm, 
Produce of the farm on hand, 
Carriages and agricultural implements, 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 
Beds and bedding in the inmates' de 

partment, .... 

Other furniture in the inmates', depart 

ment, including apparatus for fir* 

department, .... 
Personal property in the Superintend 

exit's department, 
Keady-made clothing, . 
Dry goods, . 
Provisions and groceries, 
Drugs and medicines, . 
Fuel, .... 
Library, 
For repairs and improvements, includ 

ing lime, cement, sand and brick, 
For transportation of paupers, 
For invoicing State property in 1861, 
For cash received for articles sold, and 

support of paupers, . 
Cash on hand, 



Making the net sum for the support of inmates, 
Being $51.14 for each pauper one year, or 98J- cts 
per week. 



2,503 23 




2,113 50 




599 77 




1,065 72 




695 75 




3,147 50 




331 62 




1,176 07 




bb 15 




54 50 




430 86 




531 50 






$33,525 53 




imates, . 


$33,185 12 



ESTIMATED PRODUCE OF THE FARM. 

5,648 pounds pork, at 8 cents, 
5,831 " beef, at 7 cents, 
1,488 " veal, at 8 cents, 

43 pigs sold, . 

2 calves sold, 
107 tons hay, at $12, 

3 " coi^nstalks, at $6, 
3J " oats, at $12, 



$451 84 

408 17 

119 04 

121 25 

6 00 

1,284 00 

18 00 

42 00 



1862.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



15 



8 J tons squashes, at $ 20, . 

50 bushels buckwheat, at 67 cents, 
1,200 " potatoes, at 40 cents, 

100 " onions, at $1, . 
2,500 " carrots, at 25 cents, 

35 " corn, at 80 cents, . 

35 u green corn, at 60 cents, 

10 " peas, at $1.25, 
425 " beets, at 25 cents, . 

70 " parsnips, at 37J cents, 
500 u turnips, at 25 cents, 

20 " tomatoes, at 50 cents, 

30 " cucumbers, at 25 cents, 
150 " apples, at 25 cents, . 

1 " beans, at $2.50, 

2 " currants, at $1.60, . 
150 pounds pie plant, at 4 cents, 

2,800 heads cabbage, at 5 cents, . 
6,209-|- gallons milk, at 12| cents, 
lettuce, .... 







$170 00 






33 50 






480 00 






100 00 






625 00 






28 00 






21 00 






12 50 






106 25 






25 75 






125 00 






10 00 






7 50 
37 50 

2 50 

3 20 
6 00 

140 00 

776 18 

10 00 




$5,170 18 



While Massachusetts extends the right hand of fellowship to 
her schools, colleges and seminaries of learning, she does not 
forget to provide for her poor and unfortunate. It is one of 
her crowning glories to be distinguished for such a union of 
intelligence, generosity, and philanthropy. The destitute, not 
having a settlement within her borders, however humble and 
lowly, the deaf and dumb, the blind, insane, idiotic, and those 
committed to the reformatory and industrial schools, are freely 
supplied with every necessary comfort which a munificent 
Christian Commonwealth can possibly bestow. During the 
past eight years, the period of its existence, eleven thousand 
three hundred and nine persons have been admitted and made 
the recipients of the charities of this institution. Of the above 
admissions, the majority have been children. It is especially 
for this class of inmates that we feel encouraged to labor, 
hoping it may not be in vain. To restrain and guide them 
properly, taken as they are, in most cases, from families with- 



18 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

out parental obedience, having never received the lessons of 
wholesome discipline, calls for the largest share of wisdom, and 
the most unremitting watchfulness. In this connection I desire 
to state, that for the four years from October, 1858, to October, 
1862, there have been indentured and put out on trial, four 
hundred and fifty-four children from this institution. 

Now, in view of the fact that so many thousands of the 
unfortunate have here sought and obtained a shelter and a 
resting-place, and that so many hundreds of children, poor and 
friendless, have been indentured, and thus able to find homes 
in the midst of intelligent and Christian families, who will 
question the necessity, the humanity and economy of such a 
charity ? The usefulness of this institution, and an adequate 
return for its expenditures, must be determined by its results. 
My own experience convinces me that these children have been 
able to secure far better homes by a course of training in the 
almshouse, than they would had they never been members of 
our household. They thus become equals with the most favored 
children, and in the struggle of life will show themselves worthy 
of all the successes attendant upon meritorious and well-directed 
effort. 

General prosperity during the year has attended every depart- 
ment. The schools are in a flourishing condition. The average 
attendance has been three hundred and twenty. Four teachers, 
one male and three females, have been constantly employed. 

The health of the institution has generally been very good. 
With the exception of measles, no epidemic has prevailed. Of 
this disease there have been one hundred and ten cases, and in 
a few instances, where there was a pulmonary predisposition, 
and as the sequela of measles, death occurred. There have 
been sixty-one deaths during the year. For the details of the 
medical department, I would respectfully refer you to the 
doctor's report. 

The religious interests of the institution are fully set forth by 
the Chaplain, to whose report I have the pleasure to refer you. 

The farm continues from year to year to increase in value 
and productiveness. Every stump removed, every foot of stone 
wall built, and every rod of wet land drained and made dry, 
adds to the permanent value of the real estate. As fast as these 
improvements are made, the productions of the farm accumu- 



1862.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 17 

late. Hay is the principal crop, for which it is well adapted. 
Of this we have secured, the past season, one hundred and 
seven tons, of most excellent quality. From a piece of land 
recently reclaimed, we obtained of the best of hay in July and 
September, by actual weight, five tons per acre. Having seeded 
to grass last spring several acres more adjoining the above, we 
shall expect a much larger return another season than in any 
previous year, and then will be seen the necessity of having a 
new barn, or an addition to the old one. The other crops, 
though not gathered, give promise of an abundant harvest. 

The buildings, during the year, have all been painted, greatly 
improving their appearance, as well as bestowing the real benefit 
which they so much needed. We have managed, without 
expense to the State, to build a nice coal-house, which is very 
convenient. Various improvements have been made in and 
around the buildings, which contribute to our comfort. 

And now, in closing, it is my pleasure, gentlemen, to con- 
gratulate your Board and all the officers connected with the 
institution, on our healthy and prosperous condition, grateful 
for the blessings of the past, and hopeful for the future. 

JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jr., 

Superintendent. 

Monson State Almshouse, 
October 1, 1862. 



18 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S EEPOET 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — The lapse of another year makes it my duty to 
submit to you the usual annual report of the medical department 
of this institution. 



Number remaining in hospital, September 30, 1861, 
admitted during year, .... 
births, including three stillborn, 

deaths, 

discharged, 

remaining in hospital, September 30, 1862, 



59 

645 

2L 

61 

589 

75 



The following diseases have been treated during the year : 



Abscess, 

Acne, 

Anasarca, . 

Ascites, 

Asthma, 

Burn, . 

Cancrum Oris, . 

Cancer, 

Cholera Morbus, 

Chilblains, . 

Congestion of Lungs, 

Convulsions, 

Coxalgia, . 

Croup, 

Debility, . 

Diarrhoea, . 

Dislocation, 

Dysentery, . 

Eczema, 

Entozoa, . 



29 


Epilepsy, . 




16 


Erysipelas, . 


2 


Felon, 


3 


Fever, 


3 


Fistula in Ano, 


2 


Fracture, . 


13 


Frostbite, . 


2 


Gastric notation 


2 


Gonorrhoea, 


3 


Haemoptysis, 


1 


Hernia, 


4 


Herpes, 




1 


Influenza, 




4 


Iritis, . 




15 


Jaundice, 




13 


Marasmus, 




1 


Measles, 




4 


Mumps, 




8 


Necrosis, 




2 


Neuralgia, 





2 
2 
1 

28 
1 
3 
8 

12 
2 
3 
3 
1 

22 

1 

3 

2 

110 

11 
1 



1862.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 



19 



Nostalgia, . 








. 1 


Scarlatina, . 


. 2 


Ophthalmia, 








. 128 


Scrofula, .. 


. 5 


Otorrhea, . 








. 6 


Spinal Irritation, 


. 2 


Paralysis, . 








5 


Syphilis, 


. 8 


Parturition, 








. 21 


Suppression of Menses, 


. 1 


Pertussis, . 








. 1 


Tonsillitis, . 


. 3 


Phthisis, 








. 13 


Tinea Capitis, 


. 4 


Pneumonia, 








. 7 


Uterine Hemorrhage, 


. 1 


Porrigo, 








. 1 


Ulcer Leg, . 


. 8 


Rheumatism, 








. 12 


Varicella, . . . 


. 1 


Scabies, 








59 


Wounds, 


. 7 


Causes of Death. 




Apoplexy, ..... 1 


Dentition, . 


. 2 


Burn, . . 






1 


Diarrhoea, . 


. 3 


Cancrum Oris, . 






3 


Dropsy, . 


. 2 


Cholera Infantum, 






2 


Fever, Typhoid, 


. 1 


Convulsions, 






4 


Epilepsy, . 


. 1 


Croup, 






1 


Haemoptysis, 


. 1 


Congestion of Lungs, . 






1 


Marasmus, . 


. 3 


Consumption, 






6 


Pneumonia, 


. 7 


Congenital Syphilis, . 






1 


Scrofula, . 


. 2 


Cancer, 






2 


Tonsillitis, . 


. 2 


Debility, 








15 







For the first time during my connection with the institution, 
we have, during the past year, been visited by an epidemic in 
the form of measles. The disease made its appearance early in 
January, and although it was near the middle of the month 
before the second case occurred, it spread so rapidly that there 
were eighty-four cases down with it before the close of the 
month. After this avalanche we continued to have straggling 
cases through February and March, into April, making, in all, 
over one hundred cases, including, all, or nearly all, those who 
were liable to take the infection. All recovered kindly from 
the primary disease, but the pneumonia which supervened as a 
sequela, proved fatal in several instances. 

The number of deaths does not give a fair index of the sani- 
tary condition of the inmates here. Of the sixty-one deaths 
occurring during the past year, forty died within four months, 
and twenty-nine in less than two months after admission. 
Eighteen of those dying within two months of their admission, 
were under one year old. So that forty of the deaths were 
either infants, enfeebled by exposure and neglect, or hopelessly 



20 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

diseased adults, who sought the asylum of the almshouse in 
sickness and suffering, to be nursed and cared for in their hard 
passage to the tomb. Then if we deduct from the remaining 
twenty-one deaths those who were with us at the commence- 
ment of the year, and who have died of old age and incurable 
disease, we shall find the number of those small who have died 
from diseases incident to the establishment. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, permit me to assure you of my 
high personal regard and esteem. 

JOSEPH D. NICHOLS, Physician. 

Monson, October 1, 1862. 



1862.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 30. 21 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — I hardly thought, a year ago, that my health 
would permit me to perform the services of a Chaplain in this 
institution, until the present time ; but, through the mercy of 
God, I have continued to officiate as usual. 

On one Sabbath morning during the past year, I was detained 
from the chapel by sickness ; on three Sabbath mornings I pro- 
cured preaching by exchanges, and on two others I was absent, 
and my place was kindly supplied by brethren in the ministry. 
On all the other Sabbath mornings of the year, I preached here 
myself. 

I have also assisted in the Sabbath school, conducted evening 
worship in the chapel, visited the sick, offered prayers in conse- 
quence of deaths, and attended a prayer-meeting weekly in the 
men's hospital, as formerly. I have been much aided in the 
Sabbath school by our school teachers and several other officers; 
and Dr. Brewster, the faithful Superintendent of the institution, 
has, as in former years, constantly performed services in the 
chapel for the benefit of the inmates, on Sabbath afternoons. 
Serious attention has appeared to be given to preaching and 
other religious exercises ; individuals who previously enter- 
tained a Christian hope, have seemed to be edified ; but I do 
not know that instances of conversion have occurred. A large 
part of the adult inmates have long been accustomed to immoral 
practices, and perhaps it can hardly be expected that many of 
such a character will be savingly changed. It should, however, 
be remembered for our encouragement, that " with God all 
things are possible." 

The number in our Sabbath congregation, as counted on a 
recent Sabbath, was, exclusive of the officers of the institution, 



22 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. '62. 

395, which is probably someliwat less than the average attend- 
ance during the year. Of that number, 41 were men, 57 women, 
and 297 Sabbath school children. A considerable proportion of 
the children have learned well in the Sabbath school, are moral 
in their conduct, and seem likely to become good members of 
society. 

I remain, gentlemen, yours, with much respect, 

EBENEZER B. WRIGHT, Chaplain. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
September 30, 1862. 






PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 29. 

TENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT 



INSPECTORS 



STATE ALMSHOUSE 



A. T M O N 8 O N 



OCTOBER, 1863 



BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER, STATE PRINTERS, 

No. 4 Spring Lane. 

18 6 4. 



tatmoraoealtf) of JttasMrt)uectts. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT 



To His Excellency the Governor, and the Honorable Council : 

The Tenth Animal Report of the Inspectors of the State 
Almshouse at Monson, for the year closing with September 30, 
1863, is herewith submitted. 

Besides detailing the financial condition of the institution — 
enumerating its expenses, and showing the aggregate, — there 
is little to be said in addition to what the Inspectors have 
remarked in previous Reports. 



The number of inmates in the almshouse, at the time 

of making our last Annual Report, was 
Admitted and born during the past year, 
Discharged, indentured, deserted and died, . 
Remaining in the almshouse, September 30, 1863, 
Average number supported through the year, 



596 
713 
739 
570 
601 



Decrease from the average number supported last year, 48 
Cost per week of supporting each inmate, . . . $1.02-}- 

Notwithstanding the advance in cost of almost every thing 
consumed by the institution, expenses have been kept within 
the limits of the appropriation made by the legislature, which 
was the same as appropriated for annual expenses in several 
previous years. To do this has required judicious, economical 
management by the Superintendent. 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

The inmates of the almshouse are, as follows : — 

Men, . . . . . . . 42 

Women, 99 

Boys, ' 264 

Girls, 165 

No able-bodied men have been inmates during the year, and 
it has been necessary to hire help for almost the entire opera- 
tions upon the farm. The boys have been employed to good 
advantage in the cultivation of garden crops. 

It has been considered good policy to convert a large portion 
of the farm into grass land, with a view to raising milk, which 
is a chief part of the food of the children. The product of 
hay has this year reached one hundred and thirty tons, being 
an increase of twenty-three tons over the crop of last year, and 
one hundred and twenty-two tons over that raised the first 
year after the farm came into possession of the State. The 
crop has outgrown the capacity of the barn, and a considerable 
quantity has been stacked in the field. 

Another barn is very much needed, in which' to store pro- 
ducts of the farm. With present accommodations, it is impos- 
sible to keep stock enough to consume the hay and root crops. 
The estimated expense of a new barn, suitable for present and 
future wants, is three thousand dollars ($3,000.) The Inspec- 
tors propose applying to the legislature for an appropriation to 
meet this want. 

More pasturing is also needed to feed stock in summer. For 
several years a neighboring field has been rented, but we 
believe it would be economy for the State to purchase pastur- 
ing sufficient to maintain in summer such number of cows and 
other stock as the hay and root crops are capable of feeding in 
winter. 

The unexpended balance of last year's appropriation, amount- 
ing to six hundred seventy-seven dollars and twenty-five cents, 
(1677.25,) by consent of the last legislature, will be used in 
laying new floors. Four hundred and twenty-four dollars 
($124) has already been expended for this purpose. 

A dam erected across a small stream upon the farm, for the 
purpose of making an ice and bathing pond, was carried away 



1863.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 5 

by a freshet last summer. It is necessary that the dam should 
be rebuilt, as it affords a causeway across the stream much 
used in going from one part of the farm to the other. The 
expense of rebuilding will amount to about one hundred and 
fifty dollars (1150.) 

The hospital has received one hundred and thirty-nine less 
patients than during last year ; and the mortality has also been 
less. Pneumonia prevailed among inmates considerably last 
winter, but no deaths occurred in consequence. Ophthalmia, 
that pest of all almshouses, has not prevailed so extensively as 
in several years past. The Physician's report, attached to our 
own, furnishes a list of diseases treated, and the cause of 
deaths which have occurred. 

Number admitted to the hospital during the year, . . 506 

Number of births, . 13 

Number of deaths, 56 

Discharged from hospital, 462 

Remaining, September 30, 1863, ..... 63 

The Chaplain's report, annexed, contains a brief record of 
his ministry during the year. Services have been held regu- 
larly in the chapel every Sabbath, and divine worship has been 
attended every evening previous to the retiring of inmates. 
A Sabbath school for the children, and a weekly prayer-meeting 
in the men's hospital, have constituted a part of the religious 
exercises. 

The educational department has been in charge of one male 
and three female teachers. An average of three hundred 
children have attended the several schools, which will bear 
favorable comparison with any of the common schools in the 
Commonwealth. 

One hundred and five children have been received from the 
almshouse at Tewksbury. 

One hundred and thirty-eight boys and girls have been 
indentured during the year ; making seven hundred and sixty 
children who have been provided with homes out of the alms- 
house since its opening. They have been principally inden- 
tured to farmers in the New England States. Among so large 
a number, it is not surprising that some of them are returned 



6 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

to be indentured to other parties. These cases are not. 
unfrequent, and the Superintendent and Inspectors are daily 
engrossed with the care and welfare of these children. 

Some of the boys indentured several years ago have grown 
up to reward the Commonwealth for its charitable care, by 
bearing arms in its name, in defence of the liberties and Con- 
stitution of the Nation. During the past year one, at feast, 
has sealed this testimony with his life-blood upon the field of 
battle. The bounty-money of several of these young volun- 
teers has been intrusted to the Inspectors, who have deposited 
it in savings institutions. 

When we consider how many children have been saved from 
a life of pauperism and crime through the instrumentality of 
this institution, we cannot but think that the salvation of even 
one of these is worth more to society and the world than all 
the almshouse has cost. 

The inventory shows an increase in the valuation of property 
to the amount of one thousand three hundred twenty-nine 
dollars and twenty-seven cents (§1,329.27) over the valuation 
of last year. This increase is chiefly due to the advance in the 
price of fuel, and the increased productions of the farm. 

INVENTORY. 

Live stock on the farm, $2,350 75 

Produce of the farm on hand, . . . 3,794 25 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . . 2,042 80 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . 3,218 73 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . . 6,061 31 
Other furniture in inmates' department, including 

apparatus for extinguishing fire, . . . 2,814 65 

Personal property in Superintendent's department, 2,378 07 

Ready-made clothing, 2,915 10 

Dry goods, 820 87 

Provisions and groceries, 1,068 77 

Drugs and medicines, ...... 645 75 

Fuel, . . . . .... . 4,174 00 

Library, 321 67 

$32,606 72 



1863.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 






OFFICERS, AND THEIR SALARIES. 

John M. Brewster, Jr., M. D., Superintendent, 

Mrs. C. S. Brewster, Matron, 

Rev. Ebenezer B. Wright, Chaplain, 

Joseph D. Nichols, M. D., Physician, 

Joseph H. Brewster, Clerk and Assistant SupH, 

Edwin N. Montague, Teacher, and charge of boys in 

play-yard, . 
Lucy M. Col ton, Teacher, 
Eliza A. G-ibbs, Teacher, 
Fannie A. Carson, Teacher, 
Elizabeth A. Reid, Nurse, 
Sarah S. Nichols, Assistant, 
Mary W. Richmond, Assistant, 
Hannah W. Wheelock, Seamstress, 
Willard J. Clark, Cook in inmates' department, and 

charge of fire apparatus, water pipes and stoves, 
John N. Lacy, Engineer and Machinist, 
Charles Gates, Baker, ...... 

George H. Fisherdick, Farmer, . . . . 

Charles Adams, Farmer, 

Elisha B. Hubbard, Supervisor of male and laundry 

departments, ....... 

Frank H. Wood, Assistant, 

Russell D. Gibbs, Watchman, . . . . 



,200 00 
300 00 
400 00 
600 00 
500 00 

300 00 
156 00 
156 00 
156 00 
208 00 
156 00 
156 00 
156 00 

450 00 
480 00 
312 00 
325 00 
250 00 

£25 00 
216 00 
200 00 



17,002 00 



inspectors' salaries. 



Gordon M. Fisk, . 
Gilbert A. Smith, . 
George Chandler, . 



$160 00 
160 00 
160 00 

$480 00 



The Report of the Superintendent, which follows our own, 
enumerates expenses for the year, and exhibits other facts 
relating to the institution. 

While it has been the aim of Superintendent and Inspectors 
to exercise wholesome economy in every department, the in- 



8 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

mates have been well fed, comfortably clothed, and in everj 
respect well cared for. 

In conclusion, the Inspectors desire to bear testimony to the 
earnest and faithful labors of the Superintendent in the many 
cares and anxieties which surround him. They also take 
pleasure in saying, that the subordinate officers have dis- 
charged their respective duties with commendable fidelity. 

GORDON M. FISK, 
GILBERT A. SMITH, 
GEORGE CHANDLER, 

Inspectors. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
October 1, 1863. 



1863.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — The Tenth Annual Report of this institution 
is now respectfully submitted, with the following statements : — 

The number in the institution at the date of last report, 

October 1, 1862, ....... 596 

The number admitted since, including 12 born in the 
institution, 



Whole number supported since last report, 

Number discharged and deserted, 

died, 

Remaining October 1, 1863 : 

Men, 

Women, 

Boys under 15 years of age, . 
Girls under 15 years of age, . 

Total, 



713 



. 1,309 



. 683 
. b6 



42 

99 

264 

165 



570 



1,309 



Of the number discharged, 138 are children indentured and 
on trial. 

Average number supported through the year, 601. 
Number of paupers sent out of the State, 28. 



Persons admitted this 


yei 


ir were born in 




Massachusetts, 




.... 


. 289 


Maine, 




.... 


11 


New Hampshire, . 




.... 


3 


Vermont, 




.... 


6 


Connecticut, 




♦ 


14 


Rhode Island, 




.... 


6 


2 









10 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



New York, . 












32 


Other States, 












10 


Ireland, 












. 221 


England, 












48 


Germany, 












16 


Scotland, 












16 


British Provinces, 












15 


France, 












2 


Other countries and at sea, 




- 






7 


Unknown, 












17 



713 



Towns "and Counties in Massachusetts from which Paupers 
have been received. 



BERKSHIRE < 


BOUNTY. 




Granby, . 








1 


Adams, 7 


Greenwich, 








2 


Becket, 






1 


Hadley, . 








2 


Cheshire, . 






1 


Hatfield, . 








1 


Dal ton, 






2 


Northampton, 








16 


Great Barrington, 






3 


Pelham, . 








2 


Hancock, 






2 


Prescott, . 








1 


Lee, 






6 


South Hadley, 








1 


Lenox, 






7 


Ware, 








6 


Pittsfield, 






8 


Williamsburg, 








1 


Sheffield, . 






4 


Worthington, 








1 


Stockbridge, 






1 


51 


Washington, 






5 


West Stockbridge, 






6 


HAMPDEN COUNTY. 

Chester, 2, 


53 


Chicopee, . 








15 


FRANKLIN COUNTY. 


Holland, . 








1 


Greenfield, . . . 3 


Holyoke, . 








4 


Leyden, . 






1 


Longmeadow, 








4 


Montague, 






1 


Ludlow, . 








2 


Orange, . 






2 


Monson, . 








3 


Shutesbury, 






1 


Palmer,* . 








231 


Whately, 






1 


Russell, 








1 


Wendell, . 






1 


Springfield, 








63 





Southwick, 








1 


HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 

Belchertown, .... 4 


Westfield, 
West Springfiel 
Wilbraham, 


4, 






13 

1 
6 




347 




# 


Nearly 


r all tray 


elling paupers. 











1863.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 



11 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 




Barre, .... 


1 


Brookfield, 


2 


Dana, . 


1 


Douglas, .... 


2 


Fitchburg, 


1 


Gardner, .... 


7 


Harvard, .... 


1 


Hardwick, 


1 


Hubbardston, . 


1 


Leicester, 


1 


Leominster, 


1 


Milford, .... 


9 


North Brookfield, 


1 


Oxford, .... 


9 


Shrewsbury, 


1 


Of the number received 


, 23 c 



Southbridge, 








9 


Sturbridge, 








3 


Spencer, . 








12 


Warren, . 








5 


Webster, . 








3 


Westborough, 








3 


Winchendon, 








1 


Worcester, 








48 




123 


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 




Boston, . . . 


5 


Tewksbury State Almshouse, 


105 


Born in the house, . 


12 


Transient, 








7 



37 in 1863 ; and of the 713 received during the year, all but 
about 53 are of foreign birth and parentage. 



Expenditures from October 1, 1862, to October 1, 1863: 



id for flour, .... 






. $6,179 00 


grain, .... 






468 27 


beef and pork, 






. 3,493 03 


fruit and vegetables, 






28 67 


potatoes, . 






124 23 


beans and peas, 






308 93 


fish, 






322 22 


milk, .... 






2,653 49 


dry goods and bedding, . 






3,709 19 


hats and caps, 






157 25 


boots, shoes and leather, . 






886 28 


hardware and cutlery, 






57 25 


brooms, mops and brashes, 






123 78 


fuel and lights, 






4,819 06 


tin and wooden ware, 






60 42 


farm implements and seeds, 






85 41 


farm stock, 






87 50 


plaster, . 






33 32 


extra labor on farm, 






194 64 


harness, .... 






14 75 



12 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Paid for clothes-lines, . 








$9 00 


medical supplies, 








137 68 


crackers, 








75 32 


poultry and eggs, 








75 89 


crockery, 








85 65 


books and stationery, 






98 79 


stoves and fixtures, 






116 06 


straw, .... 






81 04 


blacksmithing, 








74 04 


sundry groceries, 








. 1,991 06 


postage, . 








55 30 


salaries, . 








. 7,004 08 


soap, 








410 64 


iron bake-pans, 








15 00 


labor in shoe shop, . 








86 00 


sawing lumber, 








14 34 


machine oil, . 








19 50 


repairing slate roof, 






17 44 


repairs and improvements, 






481 26 


lime, cement and sand, . 






59 32 


hops and malt, 






11 50 


invoicing State property in 186 


2, 




25 40 


vinegar, .... 






6 75 


labor of sundry persons, . 






149 64 


expenses, .... 






206 75 


railroad freight, 






249 60 


express and telegraph compani< 


38, . 




17 64 


baskets, .... 






11 76 


transportation of paupers, 






56 82 


tobacco and snuff, . 






144 75 


consultation in 1861, 






10 00 


pasturing, .... 






24 00 


sundries, .... 






20 15 




$35,648 86 


Inspectors' salaries, . 


480 00 


$36,128 86 



1863.] public document—no. 29. 13 

Cr. 

By cash, for board of paupers, . . $88 86 

By cash, for articles sold, . . . 775 00 

By cash, of State Treasurer, . . 35,265 00 

Total expenditures for the year, $36,128 86 

From this deduct — 

Transportation of paupers, . . . $56 82 
Repairs and improvements, including 

slate roof, 498 70 

Lime, cement, sand and brick, . . 59 32 
Invoicing State property in 1862, . 25 40 
Consultation in 1861, .... 10 00 
Cash received for articles sold, and sup- 
port of paupers, .... 863 86 



$1,514 10 



Total amount of running expenses, . . $34,614 76 

Balance remaining of the appropriation for the 

year 1863, . $12,713 04 

The amount of inventory September 30, 1862, . $31,277 45 
Total amount of cash received from the State Treas- 
urer, from October 1, 1862, to October 1, 1863, . 35,265 0Q 



From this amount should be deducted, as per in- 
voice, September 30, 1863 : 
Total amount of inventory, . . . $32,606 72 
Transportation of paupers, . . . 56 82 

Repairs and improvements, including 
lime, cement, sand, and repairing 

slate roof, 558 02 

For invoicing State property in 1862, . 25 40 

For consultation in 1861, ... 10 00 

For cash received for articles sold, and 

support of paupers, .... 863 86 
Cash on hand, 503 86 



,542 45 



$34,624 68 



Making the net sum for the support of inmates, . $31,917 77 
Being $53.11 for each pauper one year, or $1,021 p er week. 



14 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



ESTIMATED PRODUCE OP THE FARM. 

6,121 pounds pork, at 8 cents, 
4,117 " beef, at 8 cents, 
429 " veal, at 10 cents, 
89 pigs sold, 
10 calves sold, . 
14 tons hay sold, 
130 tons bay, at $12, 
41 " cornstalks, at $6, 

6 " soiling, at $ 8, 
8| " squashes, at $20, . 
25 bushels buckwheat, at 75 cents, 



700 


a 


potatoes, at 50 cents, 


2,500 


u 


carrots, at 25 cents, . 


75 


a 


onions, at $1, . 


60 


a 


corn, at $1, 


40 


a 


green corn, at 68 cents, 


575 


a 


beets, at 25 cents, . 


775 


a 


turnips, at 25 cents, 


50 


a 


parsnips, at 38 cents, 


40 


a 


tomatoes, at 50 cents, 


50 


a 


apples, at 33 cents, . 


6 


a 


beans, at $3, . 


45 


u 


cucumbers, at 25 cents, 


12 


a 


peas, at $ 1.25, 


300 


pounds 


pie plant, at 4 cents, 


, 


lettuce 


, . . . . 


2 busheh 


5 currants, at $1.60, . 


2,500 heads cabbage, at 5 cents, . 


7,685 gallons 


milk, at 12J cents, . 



$489 68 


329 


36 


42 


90 


140 


25 


30 


00 


196 


00 


1,560 


00 


25 


50 


48 


00 


170 


00 


18 


75 


350 


00 


625 


00 


75 00 


60 


00 


27 


20 


143 


75 


193 


75 


19 


00 


20 


00 


16 50 


18 


00 


11 


25 


15 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


3 


20 


125 


00 


960 


62 



$5,737 71 



It is a pleasure in being able to report, that during the past 
year general prosperity has attended every department. The 
officers have been faithful, and the inmates apparently con- 
tented and happy. We cannot but acknowledge that a kind 
Providence hath remembered us, and been our guide and 
support. 



1883.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 15 

Since the opening of the Monson almshouse, seven hundred 
and sixty children have found good homes through its instru- 
mentality. One hundred and thirty-eight, of the above have 
been indentured and put out on trial during the past year. 
Many of our older boys are now on the battle-field, and some 
have been slain while fighting for the Union. 

The three schools, with an average of three hundred schol- 
ars, have been successfully taught by one male and three 
females, as in former years. By the introduction of gymnastic 
exercises into the larger school, new life and interest seems to 
have been imparted to many of the pupils. Nothing has con- 
tributed more to the health and happiness of the children, than 
the bringing of pure spring water into their play-grounds. 
Two fountains have been recently put up, one in each yard, 
which now fully supplies them with constantly running water. 

The reports of the attending Physician and Chaplain are 
appended to my own, giving statements of their respective 
fields of labor. 

The products of the farm have greatly increased in value 
over those of preceding years. As there has been no male 
inmate help for out-door work, we have been obliged to hire 
more laborers, thus necessarily swelling the agricultural ex- 
penses. The hay crop (one hundred and thirty tons) is so large 
that we cannot store it all, and have stacked out several tons 
for the want of sufficient barn-room. The liay and roots will 
enable us to winter much more stock than the barn can accom- 
modate, and more even than we can summer, for the want of 
pasturing. It has now become a certainty that another large 
barn is needed, and that more pasture land is also wanted for 
our increasing herd of cows. 

By a provision made in the Resolve of chap. 8, 1863, there 
has been expended for the purposes therein specified the sum 
of four hundred and twenty-four dollars ($424), the unex- 
pended balance of which has not as yet been drawn from the 
treasury, but will be used probably during the year. 

Owing to the great advance in the price of almost every 
article which we use and consume, the expenditures have 
slightly increased over those of last year. This advance is not 
surprising, and it is confirmed by the experience of every 
household, however small. 



16 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

Permit me, gentlemen, in conclusion, to acknowledge your 
friendly support, and may the blessing of God still rest upon 
the institution and upon the efforts made to promote the com- 
fort and well being of every inmate. 

JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jr., 

Superintendent, 

Monson State Almshouse, 
October 1, 1863. 



1863.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No.' 29. 



17 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with established custom, I here- 
with submit to you a report of the condition of the medical 
department of this institution, for the year ending September 
30, 1863. 



Number remaining in hospital, September 30, 1862 
admitted during the year, . 
births, including one stillborn, . 

deaths, 

discharged, 

remaining in hospital, September 30, 1863 



75 
506 

13 

b^ 
462 

63 



The following is a list of the diseases which have been 
treated during the year, with the number of cases in each 
disease : 



Abscess, 








16 


Dentition, . 








4 


Acne, 








3 


Diarrhoea, . 








24 


Amaurosis, 








1 


Dislocation, 








4 


Amenorrhea, 
Anasarca, . 








2 
4 


Dysentery, 
Entozoa, . 








4 
3 


Ascites, 
Asthma, 








2 
2 


Erysipelas, 
Fever, 








2 

26 


Burn, 








3 


Fracture, . 








8 


Cancrum Oris, 








4 


Frostbite, . 








a 


Carbuncle, 








1 


Gangraena Senilis, 






l 


Cholera Morbus, 






12 


Gastric Irritation, 






12 


Cholera Infantum, 






4 


Gonorrhoea, 






3 


Concussion Brain, 
Convulsions, 






2 

4 


Hsemoptysis, 
Haemorrhoids, 








2 
2 


Croup, 
Debility, 








3 
. 11 


Hernia, 
Herpes, 








2 
1 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Influenza, . 






7 


Pruritus, 






1 


Jaundice, . 






1 


Rheumatism, 






12 


Lumbar Abscess, 






1 


Scabies, 






83 


Mumps, 






16 


Scarlatina, . 






1 


Necrosis, 






1 


Scrofula, 






2 


Neuralgia, . 






1 


Spinal Irritation, 






2 


Ophthalmia, 






96 


Sprain, 






9 


Paralysis, . 






6 


Syphilis, 






4 


Parturition, 






13 


Tonsillitis, . 






2 


Phthisis, 






17 


Tinea Capitis, . 






3 


Pleurisy, 






4 


Ulcer Leg, 






3 


Pneumonia, 






40 


Wounds, 






7 


Causes of Death. 


Anasarca, ..... 2 


Dysentery, . . . . 1 


Ascites, 






. 1 


Fever, Typhoid, 






. 3 


Apoplexy, . 






2 


Gangrsena Senilis, 






1 


Cancer, 






. 1 


Hydrocephalus, . 






1 


Cholera Infantum, 






. 4 


Inanition, . 






1 


Convulsions, 






. 2 


Paralysis, . 






. 1 


Consumption, 






. 10 


Phrenitis, . 






. 1 


Debility, 






. 11 


Pneumonia, 






2 


Dentition, . 






. 4 


Scrofula, 






2 


Diarrhoea, . 






. 6 











During last January we were visited by pneumonia, which 
assumed the form of an epidemic, and more than thirty cases 
were down with it in a few days, none of which, however, 
proved fatal. With this exception, there has been no prevail- 
ing disease during the year now closed. 

We have had about the usual number of cases of scabies 
and ophthalmia, those inevitable and unfailing concomitants of 
an almshouse. 

As heretofore, a large majority of. the deaths has occurred 
among those who came in here during the year hopelessly 
diseased, to find shelter and relief in their last struggle with 
mortality. Several of them, in fact, reached here in a mori- 
bund condition, and died in a few hours after admission. 

I tender you my thanks, gentlemen, for your uniform kind- 
ness and consideration. 



Respectfully yours, 

J. D. NICHOLS, Physician. 



1863.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 29. 19 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — During the past year there has been preaching 
in the chapel every Sabbath morning but one. On that morn- 
ing I was too unwell to preach, and did not secure a supply. 
Since the latter part of March, on account of the feebleness of 
my health, I have obtained Rev. William F. Avery to preach 
for me a considerable part of the time. Mr. Avery's discourses 
have been adapted to our congregation, and have evidently 
been listened to with much interest. They have in general 
been well calculated to gain the attention of the young ; and I 
cannot doubt that they have made a salutary impression on 
youthful minds. 

Our congregation, on Sabbath mornings, has consisted of the 
inmates of all ages, who have been able to be present, together 
with most of the officers of the institution. 

The other services of a chaplain, besides the Sabbath morn- 
ing exercises, I have performed much as in former years, 
assisting in the Sabbath school, conducting evening worship in 
the chapel, attending a prayer-meeting weekly in the men's 
hospital, visiting the sick when it has seemed to be expedient, 
and offering prayers in consequence of deaths. 

The respected Superintendent of the institution has con- 
tinued to manifest much interest in the spiritual welfare of the 
inmates ; and on Sabbath afternoons, has regularly performed 
services in the chapel for their benefit. 

Our Sabbath school has been composed of the same children 
that have attended the week-day schools. The average attend- 
ance has been nearly three hundred. The teachers of the 



20 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. '63. 

week-day schools, with some others, have faithfully assisted in 
the Sabbath school. 

Efforts to secure the moral and religious improvement of the 
children, and of older persons, though they have not in all 
cases been attended with such success as could be desired, yet 
have not, I trust, been wholly in vain. 

Yours, gentlemen, with much respect, and sincere gratitude 
for the favors you have shown me, 

EBENEZER B. WRIGHT, Chaplain. 

State Almshouse, Monson, ) 
September 30, 1863. \ 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 26. 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



OF THE 



INSPECTOE8 



STATE ALMSHOUSE. 



^ T MONSON 



OCTOBER, 1864 



BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER, STATE PRINTERS, 

No, 4 Spring Lane, 

18 6-5. 



dTommoncocaltl) of Jtta&acljusdte. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor ', and the Honorable Council : 

With the closing financial year of this almshouse, September 
30th, 1864, the Inspectors submit their Eleventh Annual 
Eeport. 

A slight decrease from the average number of inmates sup- 
ported last year is shown by the statistics of this Report. 

The number of inmates in the almshouse, September 

30, 1863, at the time of making our last Eeport, was 570 

Admitted and born during the year, . . . . 820 

Discharged, indentured, deserted and died, . . . 770 

Remaining in the almshouse, September 30, 1864, . 620 

Average number supported through the year, . . 557 

Decrease from the average number supported last year, 44 

Cost per week of supporting each inmate, . . $1.02-|f 

The inmates are mostly children, and are classed as follows : 

Men, 44 

Women, 114 

Boys, 288 

Girls, 174 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

The care of so large a number of children has rendered it 
necessary to increase the number of officers ; and in several 
instances wages have been raised ; hence an increase in the 
amount of salaries over the aggregate exhibited in previous 
Reports. 

The annual appropriation to meet current expenses was 
increased by the legislature last winter from thirty-six thousand 
dollars ($36,000) to thirty-nine thousand dollars, (39,000) 
which sum will be entirely expended by the close of the appro- 
priation year, January 1, 1865. Should there be no abatement 
in high prices a larger appropriation will be required to defray 
expenses the coming year. 

The farm, notwithstanding the severe drouth which has pre- 
vailed in this vicinity, has made liberal returns for the labor 
bestowed upon it. Inmate help for out-door purposes has 
amounted to little, consequently hired workmen have been 
employed. The hay crop is forty-two and a half tons less than 
it was last year, but is of superior quality. Other crops have 
yielded fairly. 

Improvements upon the farm have been carried forward in 
the way of surface clearing, underdraining, enriching the soil, 
and building stone walls. In the spring, a young orchard of 
apple and pear trees was set out, which is growing finely. 

A new dam has been built, to take the place of the one car- 
ried away by a freshet last year, at a cost of one hundred and 
seventy-three dollars and seventy cents, ($ 173. 70.) The new 
structure is substantially built, and believed to be capable of 
resisting any accumulation of water above it. 

An appropriation of thirty-three hundred dollars ($3,300) 
was made by the last legislature for the purpose of building a 
new barn, but its erection has been postponed till another 
spring, on account of the diminished hay crop, which is easily 
stored in the present barn, and the difficulty of obtaining help. 
It will be completed in season for securing the crops of another 
year. 

The general health of inmates has been good. Smallpox 
was introduced among them last January, and fifty-one cases 
occurred,* mostly among the children. Only one death, how- 
ever, resulted from this disease, and that in a case which did not 
originate in the institution. 



1864.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 5 

The practice of bringing paupers to the almshouse, afflicted 
with a contagious disease, exposing hundreds of children, with- 
out a word of notice, cannot be too severely condemned ; yet 
overseers of the poor did this repeatedly last winter and spring. 

The Physician's report, which we annex, is more full in its 
details than any report in previous years. The statistics of the 
report are worthy of examination. 

Admissions to the hospitals during the year, . . 624 

Discharged, 559 

Number of births, 23 

Deaths, 61 

Eev. Ebenezer Wright, who had for several years been con- 
nected with the almshouse as its Chaplain, resigned last April, 
since which time Sabbath services have been conducted by Rev. 
William K. Yaill, of Palmer, and evening services in the chapel 
by the Superintendent, and Francis E. Gleason, principal of the 
schools. The Chaplain's report will be found at the close of 
these pages. 

In the way of repairs several floors in the inmate departments 
have been relaid with hard-pine boards, purchased with an 
unexpended portion of the appropriation for 1862. 

The schools have been attended by an average of three hun- 
dred children. Two new school-rooms have been provided, and 
one additional school established. Four schools are in daily 
session, and five teachers are employed, who devote their best 
energies to the instruction of their pupils. The schools are 
graded, and registers are kept as in all our public schools. The 
children make fair progress, and in many instances advance 
rapidly. Constant changing in the schools, occasioned by the 
admission of new children and the indenturing of others, pre- 
vents the attainment of so high a grade of scholarship as would 
otherwise be realized ; yet it is in these schools that hundreds 
of juvenile minds receive their first lessons of intellectual and 
moral improvement. 

One hundred and thirty-six children have been received from 
the almshouse at Tewksbury, and sixty-five from that at 
Bridgewater, during the year. 



6 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

Eighty children have been indentured since making our last 
report. The number would have been much larger but for the 
presence of smallpox in the institution at a season when the 
demand for children is usually greatest. 

The whole number of children provided with homes out of 
the almshouse since its opening is seven hundred and twenty- 
eight. 

In binding out children great care is exercised in selecting 
proper guardians. Kecommendations from the selectmen of 
the town, and the pastor of the applicant, are required ; yet 
with all this precaution, sometimes a child gets an unsuitable 
home, and is recalled. Oftener, however, guardians are dissat- 
isfied with children, and an exchange is made, the returned 
children going to new homes, where they usually do better. ' 

The care of these indentured children increases from year to 
year, demanding more time of the Inspectors than was origi- 
nally contemplated in the duties of their office. Hundreds of 
these children, scattered all over New England, look to the 
authorities of this almshouse for protection against abuse^ and 
for the fulfilment of the agreement made with their guardians. 
The latter are required to make a detailed report to the insti- 
tution once a year, for which purpose blanks are sent them. 
But this is not sufficient. Somebody should go to them in 
their homes and learn beyond a doubt how they are cared for. 
In a previous report we recommended that an agent should be 
appointed for this purpose, and we now renew the suggestion. 
The children indentured from this and other charitable institu- 
tions of the Commonwealth would occupy the entire time of 
One person, and their welfare deserves this attention. 

The Inspectors acknowledge valuable suggestions from the 
State Board of Charities in regard to schools and other matters. 

The annual inventory of almshouse property and list of 
salaried officers, which have heretofore appeared in our reports, 
are this year transferred to the Superintendent's report, which 
follows our own, and to which we invite attention. 

It has been the earnest endeavor of the Superintendent to 
improve the condition of inmates — to feed # and clothe them 
properly — to educate the children and furnish them homes in 
good families, and to make the farm contribute as far as possible 
to the support of the institution. 



1864.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 7 

The many and important duties of Matron have been per- 
formed by Mrs. Brewster, wife of the Superintendent, in an 
energetic and faithful manner.. All other subordinate officers 
have rendered satisfactory service to the Commonwealth. 

In closing, we would not be forgetful of the Source from 
which have emanated the many blessings which through the 
year have been enjoyed by officers and inmates of this institution. 

GORDON M. FISK, 
GILBERT A. SMITH, 
GEORGE CHANDLER, 

Inspectors. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
October 1, 1864. 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



SUPEKINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — The Superintendent lias the honor to submit 
to your Board the following Annual Report for the year 
ending September 30, 1864 : — 



The number in the institution at the date of last report, 
October 1, 1863, 570 

The number admitted since, including 23 born in the 

institution, . . . . . . . 820 



Whole number supported since last report, . 



. 1,390 



Number discharged and deserted, 
died, 
Remaining October 1, 1864 : 
Men, .... 
Women, . 

Boys under 15 years of age, 
Girls under 15 years of age, 
Total, 



709 
61 



. 44 
. 114 
. 288 
. 174 



620 



1,390 



Of the number discharged, 80 are children indentured and 
on trial. 

Average number supported through the year, 557. 
Number of paupers sent out of the State, 69. 



Persons admitted this year were born in 
Massachusetts, .... 
Maine, 



357 
13 



1864.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



New Hampshire, 

Vermont, 

Connecticut, 

Ehode Island, 

New York, . 

Other States, 

Ireland, 

England, 

Germany, 

Scotland, 

British Provinces, 

France, 

Other countries, 

Unknown, 

Total, . 



11 

5 
12 
15 
24 

37 

24T 

32 

12 

10 

18 

3 

8 

16 

820 



Towns and Counties in Massachusetts from ivhich Paupers 
have been received. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 




Leverett, . 








1 


Adams, .... 


3 


Shelburne, . . . . 1 


Becket, 


1 





Dalton, .... 


2 


22 


Great Barrington, . 
Hancock, .... 
Lanesborough, ... 


2 
2 
1 


HAMPSI 

Amherst, . 
Belchertown, 


IIRE 


COUN 


TY. 


2 
3 


Lee, 

New Marlborough, . 
Peru, .... 
Pittsfield, .... 
Sandisfield, 
Sheffield, . • . 
Stockbridge, 
Williamstown, . 
Richmond, ... 


3 
1 
1 
11 
1 
2 
2 

4 

2 


Northampton, 
Cummington, 
Southampton, 
South Hadley, 
Ware, 

Westhampton, 
Worthington, 
Hatfield, . 








6 
1 
1 
11 
10 
1 
1 
1 




38 


37 

HAMPDEN COUNTY. 


FRANKLIN COUNTY. 




Agawam, 2 


Buckland, ... 


1 


Brimfield, 4 


Conway, 


1 


Chester, 1 


Greenfield, . . 
Montague, . 


9 
5 


Chicopee, 14 

Granville, 1 


Northfield, . 


4 


Holland, . 








1 



10 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Holyoke, . 








9 


Oxford, . 








4 


Longmeadow, 








1 


Petersham, 








1 


Ludlow, . 








4 


Royalston, 








1 


Monson, . 








. 10 


Rutland, . 








1 


Palmer,* . 








211 


Southborough, 








2 


Springfield, 








. 62 


Southbridge, 








5 


South wick, 








6 


Spencer, . 








1 


Westfield, 








8 


Sturbridge, 








4 


West Springfield, 






3 


Sutton, 








1 


Wilbraham, 






4 


Upton 








4 





Warren, . 








6 


341 


Webster, . 








2 


WORCESTER COUNTY. 


Westborough, . 








2 


Athol, ..... 2 


Worcester, 








56 


Barre, 








2 







Brookfield, 








1 




141 


Dudley, . 
"Grafton, . 








3 

6 


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Boston, . . 


9 


Hard wick, ■ 








2 


Tewksbury State Almshouse, 


136 


Lancaster, 








2 


Bridgewater State Almshouse, 


65 


Leicester, . 








1 


Rainsford Island Hospital, 


2 


Leominster, 








5 


Insane Hospital, Worcester, 


2 


Miiford, . 








22 


Insane Hospital, Northampton, 


1 


Millbury, . 




f 




3 


Industrial School, Lancaster, 


2 


Northbridge, 








1 


Born in the house, . 


23 


Oakham, . 








1 


Transient, 








1 



The ages of paupers received during the year are as 
follows : 





-a 

Si 

"5 


§ s 

1 a 

S 


o 

1 1 

n 


Hi 

i § 


M 


M 


O 

ii 


o 

Is 


M 


o 

n 


o 

00 

1 g 

m 


s 

>> 

3 

<D 

o 


o 


158 


145 


109 


50 


123 


74 


62 


46 


30 


18 

• 


3 


2 


820 





Of the number received, 43 came into the State in 1863, 
and 47 in 1864 ; and of the 820 received during the year, all 
but about 20 are of foreign birth and parentage. 



* Nearly all travelling paupers. 



1864.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



11 



ASSETS. 

Real estate — 

176 acres of land, viz., 25 acres woodland and 
151 acres pasturage and tillage, six acres of 
which are used for a garden, valued at, . 

Buildings and fixtures, 

Personal estate — 
Live stock on the farm, . 
Produce of the farm on hand, .... 
Carriages and agricultural implements, 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 
Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 
Other furniture in inmates' department, including 

apparatus for extinguishing fire, 
Personal property in Superintendent's department, 
Ready-made clothing, 
Dry goods, 

Provisions and groceries, . 
Drugs and medicines, 
Fuel, ... 

Library, .... 



Funds and investments— 
First— A fund of $000.00, given by 

drawing interest at — per cent. 
Second— A fund of 1000.00, given by 

etc., belonging to the institution. 



-, and 



$12,000 00 


88,492 00 


3,224 00 


5,350 95 


2,177 80 


3,218 73 


8,051 70 


2,814 65 


2,430 68 


7,336 24 


1,267 21 


1,448 08 


695 75 


7,440 00 


320 00 


$45,775 79 



RECEIPTS. 

Amount of annual appropriation for 1864, . 
Amount of unexpended appropriation of 1863 

transferred to 1864, 

Amount of special appropriation, 

Amount received from other sources, viz.: 

For articles sold, .... $570 55 

For board of paupers, . . . 104 00 



$39,000 00 

1,330 05 
2,000 00 

$42,330 05 



674 55 



Total receipts, 



$43,004 60 



12 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



CURRENT EXPENDITURES. 

John M. Brewster, Jr., M. D., Superintendent, 

Mrs. C. S. Brewster, Matron, 

Eev. Ebenezer B. Wright, Chaplain to April 1, 

1864, .... 
Eev. Wm. K. Vaill, Chaplain from April 1, 1864, 
Joseph D. Nichols, M. D., Physician, 
Joseph H. Brewster, Assistant- Superintendent and 

Clerk, .... 
Elizabeth A. Reed, Nurse, 
Edwin N. Montague, Teacher, and charge of boys 

in play yard to February 1, 1864, 
Francis E. Gleason, Teacher, and charge of boys 

in play yard from February 22, 1864, 
Lucy M. Colton, Teacher, .... 
Eliza A. Gibbs, Teacher, January 1, 1864, . 
Marietta E. Webster, Teacher from January 1. 

1864, 

Fannie A. Corson, Teacher to April 1, 1864, 
Mary W. Warner, Teacher from April 1, 1864, 
Oraville H. Waters, Teacher from May 22, 1864, 
Sarah S. Nichols, Assistant, 
Mary W. Richmond, Assistant, . 
Hannah W. Wheelock, Seamstress, 
LavinaHall, Cook in Superintendent' 's department 

from September 1, 1864, 
Willard J. Clark, Cook in inmates' department^ 

and charge of ivater pipes, fire apparatus, Sfc. 
John N. Lacey, Eiigineer and Machinist, 
Charles Gates, Baker, 
George H. Fisherdick, Farmer, 
Cliftles Adams, Farmer, . 
Elisha B. Hubbard, Assistant, 
Frank H. Wood, Assistant, 
Russell D. Gibbs, Watchman, to November 1. 

1863, . . ... . . . 

Charles Gates, Watchman from November 1, 1863. 



,200 00 
300 00 

150 00 
100 00 
600 00 

500 00 
208 00 

104 IT 



224 


65 


165 00 


39 


00 


117 


00 


78 


00 


78 


00 


55 


29 


156 


00 


156 


00 


156 


00 



12 85 



450 


00 


480 00 


312 


00 


362 


50 


250 


00 


• 333 


31 


'228 


00 


16 67 


183 


33 



$7,015 77 



1864.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



13 



$160 00 
160 00 
160 00 



Gordon M. Fisk, Inspector, 
Gilbert A. Smith, Inspector, 
George Chandler, Inspector, 

Paid for labor, . . . . 

Total for salaries and labor, 

Second — Provisions and supplies, viz. 

Meats of all kinds, . . . $ 

Fish of all kinds, .... 

Fruit and vegetables, . 

810 barrels flour, average cost per bar- 
rel delivered at Palmer depot at 
$8 55JW, . . . 

Grain and meal for table, . 

Grain and meal for stock, . 

Tea, coffee and Ihocolate, . 

Sugar and molasses, . 

Milk and cheese, 

Salt and other groceries, . 

All other provisions, . 

Total for provisions and supplies, 



Third, — Clothing, shoes, hats and caps, 

Fourth, — Fuel and lights, . 

Fifth, — Medicines and medical supplies. 

Sixth, — Furniture, dry goods, and bedding, in- 
cluding 1204.79 school-roQm furniture, . 

Seventh, — Transportation and travelling ex- 
penses, 

Eighth, — Miscellaneous expenses, 

Total current expenses, . . . . 



$480 00 
610 00 

3,105 77 



£3,881 81 
504 97 

# 55 




6,926 38 




75 00 




968 67 




638 35 




1,283 34 
2,365 23 




1,130 40 

483 62 






18 559 32 




994 25 


? • • 


6,265 00 
250 66 



4,842 78 

530 44 
2,045 77 

$33,488 22 



EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURES. 

1st, Buildings and Improvements. 
2d, Repairs, viz.: — 
Ice Dam, $173.70 ; Arch Bridge, $120.00 ; Lime, 
Cement, &c, $51.56 ; Stoves and Furnaces, 
$192.04, and general repairs, $855.17, . 



$1,392 47 



14 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

CASH. 

Dr. — To amount expended for salaries and labor, 
provisions, fuel and^pplies, 
furniture, repairs, clothing, and dry 
goods, . . . ... 

miscellaneous items, .... 



Cr. — By cash on hand, October 1, 1863, . 

drawn from State Treasury at sun- 

dry#mes, 

received from sale of produce, 
" " other sources, . 

on hand, October 1, 1864, 



$8,105 77 
24,824 32 


8,010 60 
2,045 77 


$42,986 46 


$503 86 


42,236 46 
570 55 
104 00 
428 41 



$43,843 28 



I 

SUMMARY OF THE ABOVE. 

Total receipts, $43,414 87 

Total expenditures, . . . $42,986 46 
Cash on hand, Oct. 1, 1864, . 428 41 

$43,414 87 



The following statement shows the annual cost for supporting 
paupers : 



Dr. — Inventory at close of 1863, as taken by 

Inspectors, 

Cash on hand, October 1, 1863, 
" received of State Treasurer from Oct 

1, 1863, to October 1864, . 
" from other sources for same period, 



Cr. — By inventory at close of 1864, as taken by 
Inspectors, . . . $45,775 79 
Cash on hand, Oct. 1, 1864, 428 41 

Difference, being amount of 

expenses for the year, . 29,817 39 



$32,606 72 

503 86 

42,236 46 

674 55 

$76,021 59 



$76,021 59 



1864.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



15 



Dividing the above difference by the average weekly number 
of paupers, 557, we have as the annual cost of each pauper, 
$53.53 ; and dividing this sum by 52 the total number of weeks, 
we have as the weekly cost, 



■02ff. 



The statement below shows the expenses made agreeably to 
the Resolve of chapter 8, 1863, relating to the unexpended 
appropriation of 1862. 

Paid for lumber, 

labor, 

nails, oil and varnish, 

freight on lumber, .... 

$492 42 

Cr.— By cash of State Treasurer, .... $492 42 
JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jr., Superintendent. 

We have examined the foregoing statements and believe them to be correct. 

GORDON M. FISK, ) T , 
GILBERT A. SMITH, \ Rectors. 



$351 13 


81 


87 


26 03 


33 


39 



ESTIMATED PRODUCE OF THE FARM. 

5,662 pounds pork, at 10 cents, 
2,527 " beef, at 10 cents, 
952 # veal, at 15 cents, 
8 pigs sold, 

1 calf sold, 
8J tons hay sold, 

87 J tons hay, at $25, . 
\\ « cornstalks, at $10, 
12 " soiling, at $12, . 
3^ " squashes, at $30, . 

2 " oat straw, at $15, 
61 bushels buckwheat, at $1, 



74 


a 


oats, at $1, . . . 


787 


a 


potatoes, at 75 cents, 


1,500 


u 


carrots, at 50 cents, 


108* 


a 


onions, at $1.50, 


40 


u 


corn, at $1.60, 


38 


u 


sweet corn, at 80 cents, 



$566 20 

252 70 

142 80 

33 00 

3 00 

119 00 

2,187 50 

15 00 

144 00 

97 50 

30 00 

61 00 

74 00 

590 25 

750 00 

162 75 

64 00 

30 40 



16 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON 



221 bushels beets, at 50 cents, 
500 " 



20 

225 

6 

40 

1 

150 

1,040 

5,870 



turnips, at 37J cents, 

parsnips, at 50 cents, 

tomatoes, at $1, 

apples, at 50 cents, . 

beans, at $3, . 

cucumbers, at 40 cents, . 

peas, 

currants, at $1.75, . 
pounds pie plant, at 5 cents, 

Lettuce, 

beads cabbage, at 6 cents, . 
gallons milk, at 16 cents a gallon, 
Melons, . 



[Oct. 



1110 50 


187 50 


4 00 


20 00 


112 50 


18 00 


16 00 


2 25 


6 13 


7 50 


15 00 


62 40 


939 20 


10 00 



$6,834 08 



It may seem egotistic on my part to speak as favorably as 
I can of this institution, but if reference should be made to 
letters received from various persons, both within and without 
the Commonwealth, it would be readily perceived that this 
State charity is not lightly esteemed. It cannot be forgotten, 
I think, that the State almshouse system, as now established, 
was regarded a few years ago as an experiment of doubtful 
expediency. Do we not, in looking back ten years^see boys 
and girls running at large in greater numbers than at the 
present time ? And did we not see in our daily papers more 
reports then tha.n now, of small children in police prisons con- 
victed of petty larceny ? Our legislators saw the evil, and as 
the result of their foresight this class of children has been 
gathered from time to time, to a great extent, into the several 
State almshouses, and the problem is being rapidly if not 
already solved. A large proportion of these children, when 
first admitted, are ragge£ and filthy, unaccustomed to obey, 
and unwilling to submit to wholesome discipline. The first 
treatment of such is to wash, rub and clean, then clothe anew, 
feed and encourage, which in most cases produces a wonderful 
change. The harness being now fairly put on, our attention is 
directed to their moral, intellectual and physical training, and 
to the procuring of good homes for as many as possible, and 



1864.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 17 

while most of them remain for whom these homes are found, a 
few return to us as unmanageable, and these, we think, will 
not be lost to community, but by proper care and persevering 
effort may become, eventually, useful members of society. 
These children are not responsible for their nativity or for the 
influences which have surrounded their childhood, and the 
kindness and liberality of the State will be amply rewarded by 
causing them to be plucked as brands from the burning. 

Though it may seem somewhat novel, and with nearly a 
thousand children indentured from this institution, I wish, 
gentlemen, to invite public attention, and respectfully suggest 
the importance of an arrangement by means of which all these 
children, as far as may be practicable, shall be visited, and sat* 
isfactory information obtained as to their real condition, and 
the circumstances under which they are placed. Is it not a 
duty of the State, during the period of their minority, to 
know that the obligations of the bond are faithfully observed 
in each individual case ? For an appointed agent to visit 
them at their homes and report the result of his visitations to 
the proper authorities, I am inclined to believe would be a 
benefit to the families having them in charge, and also a great 
comfort and encouragement to the children. With nearly 
seven years' experience in the administration of the affairs of 
this institution, and having found during this period homes 
for so many hundreds of children, and daily receiving and 
answering so many letters in regard to them, I cannot but feel 
justified and strongly confirmed in the belief that something 
should be done to protect the indentured orphans, and guard 
against their being neglected or abused. 

Though the number of children indentured and put out on 
trial (80) during the year has been reasonably large, still we 
have not been able to meet the demand, inasmuch as the 
majority have been found to be too small, and a certain por- 
tion undesirable by reason of various physical infirmities and 
defects. In reply to inquiries so often made concerning the 
preliminary steps to be taken in order to procure a child from 
this institution, and as there has been an entire omission in all 
former reports in this particular, I am happy to give the 
needed information, and will say that printed blanks are fur- 
nished, for the signature of two or more of the selectmen or 
3 



18 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

overseers of the poor, and pastor of the church where the par- 
ties attend meeting, certifying that the " bearers, Mr. and Mrs. 

, are residents of this , with whom we are personally 

acquainted, and we cordially recommend them to be worthy 
citizens and suitable persons to be intrusted with the care and 
education of a child." Upon the presentation of this certifi- 
cate, properly filled, a child is selected and taken on trial for 
one month, and then, if the child gives satisfaction, it is inden- 
tured till of age, in accordance with the provision of cliapter 
seventy-one and section thirty-three of the General Statutes. 
When desired, children may be adopted. In no instance, 
whatever, is a child allowed to be taken out on trial, and 
finally indentured or adopted, when there are known to be 
good reasons to the contrary. 

The schools during the year have received unusual atten- 
tion. Five teachers are employed, — one male and four 
females, besides one female supernumerary who supplies when 
one of the others is absent, having a vacation. The average 
attendance upon the schools through the year, as shown by the 
school registers, has been three hundred, though at this time of 
writing the average is a little larger, being some three hundred 
and forty, we recently having received a delegation from the 
Tewksbury State Almshouse. In addition to these school 
children there are one hundred and twenty-five other children 
in the institution who are either too young, or whose mental 
incapacity unfits them for the school-room. 

The schools have been thoroughly graded. Two additional 
school-rooms have been provided, only one of which has as yet 
been occupied ; new school furniture consisting of the most 
approved desks and tables, has been furnished for one of the 
schools entire ; standard school-books are always obtained and 
used ; numerous blackboards, maps and tablets grace the sides 
of the rooms, and with faithful, energetic and competent 
teachers, those who are devoted to and love their employment, 
our schools cannot fail to prosper, and thus become an honor 
to the State, and an untold blessing to the children whom 
misfortune has placed within our borders. 

The reports of the Physician and Chaplain will, be found 
appended to my own, to which I would most respectfully draw 
the attention of the Board. 



1864.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 19 

A single word in regard to a hospital. As the institution, to 
a greater or less extent, is to be a home for the sick and feeble, 
far better hospital accommodations are needed in order that this 
class of inmates may receive more and better care, far more 
and better than can possibly be bestowed under the present 
arrangements. Perhaps it will be in vain to attempt to get the 
ear of the legislature, while the calls upon the treasury are so 
great, still the necessity is pressing upon us to say something 
which shall bring this subject to public notice. A model 
building, fire-proof, of proper capacity, with all the latest 
hospital improvements, ought to be erected as soon as circum- 
stances will allow. 

It will be well for the overseers of the poor of all our cities 
and towns to have an eye on the provisions of the 25th section 
of the 71st chapter of the General Statutes, as revised in 1860. 
A great many paupers are received who have been in the State 
only a few days or weeks, and the proper authorities, instead 
of notifying the " agent " of the " means of conveyance " 
bringing them within our limits to take them to " the places 
whence they came," soon as application Ik made for assistance 
send them to the State almshouse. The law only requires the 
" agent " to be notified " as soon as practicable," who after that 
notification becomes responsible for their support (for those 
brought into the State within a year,) with the alternative of 
removal according to the statutes. To comply with the laws 
on this subject would save the institution a great deal of 
trouble and needless expense, and the cities and towns would 
save the same. Will the overseers of the poor unite in 
performing this single duty ? 

There is great neglect on the part of many overseers of the 
poor in not filling their certificates, and this neglect is so com- 
mon, that I would respectfully request them to consult section 
5th, chapter 71st, of the General Statutes, and also section 
35th of the same chapter, in which it will be seen that a 
" proper certificate " is always required before the applicant 
can be legally admitted. More care, too, should be taken in 
sending us persons who have the smallpox. In more than one 
instance, during the past year, without any notice or warning 
whatever have we been exposed to this disease. 

The farm continues to improve, and is becoming more and 



20 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

more productive. The crops generally are very good, Nothing 
has suffered from the drought as much as the grass ; still the 
hay crop was never better in quality, being early secured with- 
out rains. I will here state that I purchased and used this 
season for the first time one of the No. 1 Buckeye Mowing 
Machines, which proved to be just the right thing for us, I 
consider this machine invaluable, and would not dispense with 
it for many times the original cost. As formerly, waste lands 
are being reclaimed, of which from four to five acres were 
seeded to grass this season, making some eighteen acres of rich 
land literally made within six years. It is more noticeable, 
inasmuch as this land was wholly unproductive, but now yields 
from three to five tons of good hay and rowen per acre. The 
consumption of milk here is so large, (as it of necessity must be 
with such a family of children,) it becomes us to make as much 
hay, and to keep as many cows as possible. This is our only 
apology for these long years of patient effort and toil in subduing 
so much wild land. 

Various improvements have been made within and without 
the establishment during the year, adding much to the comfort 
of the household, among which I would mention the relaying 
of several floors with well seasoned pine boards, obtained last 
year under the Resolve chapter 8 of 1863. 

Our expenditures have been unavoidably large, and cannot 
be otherwise for the year to come. 

For the general faithfulness of the assistant officers in the 
discharge of their various duties, for their almost uniform 
obedience to our rules and regulations, and for their attention 
to the laws of propriety the past year, they well claim my own 
and your thanks. 

And to you, gentlemen, I wish to express my sense of obliga- 
tion for your kindness and cordiality, and may God continue 
unto us his blessings that the new year upon which we are 
now entering may be crowned with abundant success. 

JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jr., 

Superintendent. 
Monson State Almshouse, 
October 1, 1864. 



1864.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 21 



Daily Rations for inmates in the Monson State Almshouse, 

Sunday. 
Breakfast — Wheat bread and milk and coffee. 
Dinner — Stewed peas or beans, corned beef and pork with bread. 
Supper — Wheat bread and milk, and tea or coffee. 

Monday. 
Breakfast — Wheat bread and milk and coffee. 

Dinner — Indian pudding or boiled rice, and corned beef with bread. 
Supper — Wheat bread and milk, and tea or coffee. 

Tuesday. 
Breakfast — Wheat bread and milk and coffee. 
Dinner — Fish and vegetables, with bread. 
Supper — Wheat bread and milk, and tea or coffee. 

Wednesday. 
Breakfast — Wheat bread and milk, and coffee. 
Dinner — Beef soup and vegetables, with bread. 
Supper — Wheat bread and milk, and tea or coffee. 

Thursday. 
Breakfast — Wheat bread and milk, and coffee. 
Dinner — Stewed peas or beans, corned beef and pork with bread. 
Supper — Wheat bread and milk, and tea or coffee. 

Friday. 
Breakfast — Wheat bread and milk, and coffee. 
Dinner — Fish and vegetables with bread. 
Supper — Wheat bread and milk, and tea or coffee. 

Saturday. 

Breakfast — Wheat bread and milk, and coffee. 
Dinner — Beef soup and vegetables, with bread. 
Supper — Wheat bread and milk, and tea or coffee. 

Nursery Children. 
Wheat bread, crackers, and milk, three times a day. 



22 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with established custom, I here- 
with transmit to you the Eleventh Annual Report of the 
medical department of this institution, for the year ending 
September 30, 1864. 

The introduction of the smallpox last January forms the 
most prominent feature in the history of the past year. A girl, 
convalescent from the disease, and pronounced free from the 
infection by her attending physician, was admitted during my 
absence, from Leominster, in the evening, and was only 
allowed to remain in the institution until morning, when she 
was promptly removed. In her way to the room in which she 
slept, she passed through three wards in which children were 
sleeping, and the result was that in about two weeks three of 
those children came down with the smallpox. One in the room 
in which the girl slept, and one in each of two of the wards 
through which she passed. The disease therefore was fairly ini- 
tiated, not only in the three wards referred to, but in the chil- 
dren's hospital, to which the first three cases were removed pre- 
vious to the appearance of the eruption. Vaccination was at 
once performed upon every man, woman and child who had not 
had the smallpox, without paying any regard to previous vacci- 
nation, but the disease continued to spread in defiance of every 
effort made to restrain it. Winter yielded to spring, and 
spring passed into summer, before we could free ourselves 
from the foul malady. A large majority of the cases were 
modified by previous vaccination. There were, however, sev- 
eral of these modified cases characterized by a severity little 
less than that of the worst cases of the unmodified disease. 



1864.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 23 

The physician, who pronounced the girl safe that brought in 
the disease, exhibited either a want of intelligence unworthy 
his profession, or a criminal recklessness deserving the severest 
censure. He can take either horn of the dilemma he chooses. 
A similar case was sent to us in August from Athol, where 
there was equal culpability on the part of those sending it 
here, and from which we escaped fresh exposure only by not 
relying on the decision of the physician who pronounced it safe, 
as was unfortunately done in the case from Leominster. 

Aside from the smallpox, we have had but very little acute 
disease originating in the institution during the year. Only 
one of the six cases of typhoid fever originated here, five 
having been brought in during the progress of the disease. 

Last May, for the first time since my connection with the 
institution, we were rejoiced to find ourselves entirely free 
from the prevalent contagious ophthalmia which has been so 
long the opprobrium of the almshouse, not only here, but else 
where. We were, however, allowed only a short respite for 
exultation. On the 20th of that month it was again brought 
to us by a delegation of children from Bridgewater, some 
twenty of whom were suffering from the disease when they 
reached here. 

The accompanying tables, marked 1, 2 and 3, will give you 
the statistics of disease and death in the institution during the 
past year. 

With grateful acknowledgements of past favors, and assur- 
ances of high personal regard and esteem, I remain, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. D. NICHOLS, Physician. 
Monson, October 1, 1864. 



24 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



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1864.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



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26 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



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1864.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



27 



Table No. 3, 

Showing the No. of Births in the Monson State Almshouse during each 
month, from Oct. 1, 1863, to Sept. 30, 1864, with a statement of the 
sex, and whether illegitimate, twins, or stillborn, the birth-place of the 
Mothers, and the whole No. since the opening of the Institution. 









"3 
o 


o5 

1 


a 


Illegitimate. 


(3 
I 


•5 

o 

,£5 
02 


Birth-place of Mothers. 


MONTHS. 


OS 


9 


e3 
O 


02 


oi 
M 


c 

"3) 

a 


to 
o 

-s.9 

.22 > 
S ° 




October, . 






1 


1 


- 


l 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


November, 






























- 


December, 






5 


2 


3 


2 


- 


2 


2 


- 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- 


January, 
































February, 






3 


- 


3 














3 








March, . 






2 


- 





- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


April, . . 






1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


May, . . 






1 


1 














1 










June, . . 






1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


1 


- 


July, . . 






6 


3 


3 


2 


1 


3 


- 


1 


- 


4 


- 


1 


1 


August, . 






3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


- 


" 


- 


2 


1 


- 


- 


September, 






2 


1 


1 


7 


1 

3 


1 
10 


2 


2 


4 


2 
16 


1 


2 


- 


Totals, 


25 


11 


14 


1 


AVhole No. since") 
the opening of > 
the Institution, ) 


221 


94 


127 


50 


48 


98 


6 


17 


28 


170 


4 


6 


10 



28 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — For the first six months of the present year the 
duties of chaplain were performed by Rev. Ebenezer B. Wright, 
who had officiated in that capacity the greater part of the time 
since the opening of the institution. The unanimous and 
unvarying testimony of his associates is that he was a most 
excellent man, " a workman that needeth not to be ashamed," 
judicious, faithful and successful in the performance of all his 
official duties, and that he consequently secured the confidence 
and esteem of all with whom he had intercourse. About the close 
of March last, in consequence of ill health, Mr. Wright retired 
from the office. Since that time some of the duties of chaplain 
have been performed by the undersigned. 

There has been the usual service in the chapel every Sabbath 
morning. The congregation, composed of the officers and 
teachers, and those inmates of the institution, whose age and 
health permitted their presence, has been uniform in attendance, 
decorous in deportment, and attentive. 

The hospital has been visited, and religious conversation has 
been had with the inmates. Evening worship has been con- 
ducted daily, in the chapel, by one of the teachers, with the 
occasional assistance of the Superintendent. 

The Sabbath school, under the supervision of the Superin- 
tendent, excepting for a few weeks of his recent severe illness, 
has been in session every Sabbath. He has been assisted in its 
instruction by the teachers of the day schools, and by others 
who have been connected with the institution. The number of 
teachers has been nine, the average attendance of the pupils 
three hundred. 



1864.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 29 

The importance of moral and religious instruction cannot be 
too highly estimated, and although all the good effects of labors 
in this department may not now be apparent, there is great 
encouragement to persevere in efforts to improve the minds and 
hearts of those who have been cast upon the benevolence of the 
Commonwealth. 

The undersigned avails himself of the present opportunity to 
tender to the Inspectors his high consideration. 

WILLIAM K. YAILL, Chaplain. 

State Almshouse, Monson, 
October 1, 1864. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT: No. 26. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL KEPOET 



INSPECTORS 



STATE ALMSHOUSE, 



MONSON 



OCTOBER, 18 65 



BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER, STATE PRINTERS, 
No. 4 Spring Lane. 

1866. 



€0inmom»Mltl) of ilta&sacljusrtte, 



INSPECTORS' REPORT 



To His Excellency the Governor, and the Honorable Council, 

In making the Twelfth Annual Report of the Monson State 
Almshouse, the Inspectors have little that is new or special to 
present. The operations of the institution from year to year 
are similar ; yet we believe that experience is constantly 
perfecting the system adopted by the Commonwealth for 
the maintenance of those who seek relief from poverty and 
misfortune. 

The capacity of the farm is steadily increasing. The hay 
crop the present year amounts to one hundred and thirty-five 
tons. Garden and other crops are correspondingly large. 

Over three hundred cords of fertilizers have been produced 
and applied to the farm during the year. 

George H. Fisherdick, who had been chief* farmer for several 
years, resigned last April ; and Edwin Doane, of North Brook- 
field, was engaged to succeed him. Under care of the latter, 
the farm is satisfactorily managed. 

As the article of milk enters largely into the food furnished 
to inmate children, it has been considered good policy to render 
the farm capable of supplying this want. It is found, however, 
that while hay enough can be produced to winter a sufficient 
number of cows, there is a lack of pasturage in the summer ; 
and the Inspectors believe it would be for the interest of the 



4 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

State to purchase a pasture now offered for sale, adjoining the 
farm. This pasture, containing twenty-seven acres, may be 
obtained for two thousand dollars (12,000.) The possession of 
this piece of land, which corners in upon the State property, 
would give symmetry and value to the farm. 

A new barn, eighty feet long by forty-two feet wide, has been 
erected the past summer. It is built upon a solid foundation 
of stone, is clapboarded and painted, slated upon the roof, and 
supplied with modern conveniences^ The barn has two cellars, 
one for vegetables, and the other for composting. The expense 
of building was three thousand nine hundred nine dollars and 
twenty-five cents ($3,909.25 ;) exceeding the appropriation for 
this purpose five hundred seventy-nine dollars and twenty-five 
cents ($579.25.) The latter amount the Inspectors have 
borrowed, relying upon the legislature for an appropriation to 
meet the deficiency. 

The other buildings are in a good state of repair, with the 
exception of some of the floors in the inmate department, 
which were originally of poor material. 



me of 



The number of inmates in the almshouse at the t 

making our last Report, Sept. 30, 1864, was 
Admitted and born during the year, 
Discharged, indentured, deserted and died, . 
Remaining in the almshouse, Sept. 30, 1865, 
Average number supported through the year, 
Increase over the average number supported last year, 



620 
803 
882 
541 
605 
48 



Cost per week of maintaining each inmate, . . $1.07|f 

Of the five hundred and forty-one inmates now in the insti- 
tution, four hundred and one are children under fifteen years 
of age. 

The several schools are in a prosperous condition. One new 
school was established in the spring, making five in all. They 
are taught as follows : 

Grammar school, by Mrs. Harriet E. Darte, assisted by Miss 
Lucy M. Colton. 

Intermediate school, by Miss Jane E. Hastings. 

Primary school, No. 1, by Miss Augusta Colton. 



1865.] public document—No. 26. 5 

Primary school, No. 2, by Miss Frances I. Phelps. 

Primary school, No. 3, by Miss Irene I. Burnette. 

In addition to this corps of teachers, Miss Maria Gallivan is 
employed as general assistant in the schools. 

The average number of children who have attended school 
through the year, is three hundred and thirty-one. They are 
instructed in the branches usually taught in our common 
schools, including singing and light gymnastics. 

The number of children indentured during the year, and 
now out on trial, is ninety-seven. Since the system of binding 
out children commenced at this almshouse, nearly one thousand 
have been furnished with homes in New England families. 
Children usually find good homes ; but where so many are 
indentured, it is not surprising that difficulties should con- 
stantly arise with some of them. 

We have repeatedly urged that an agent be appointed to 
look after these indentured children ; to go to them in their 
homes, and learn by actual observation how they are treated ; 
to speak words of encouragement to them, and see that the 
bond between the Inspectors and guardians is complied with. 
Such an agent could be usefully employed at this business, and 
at the same time procure places for other children. 

The experience of this institution in binding out children 
has convinced us that it is better in every respect to find them 
homes, where they will enjoy wholesome family influences, 
than to confine them for years to the daily drill of school in an 
almshouse. 

Not unfrequently do these children of the State, during their 
servitude under guardians, and after having completed their 
term of service, visit the almshouse to seek counsel of its 
officers, or to thank the Commonwealth for its kind benefaction. 

The record of mortality is larger than it was last year. This 
is not owing to any epidemic or contagious disease, but to the 
fact that a large proportion of those who have died were infants 
under one year of age, who had been deserted by their mothers, 
and persons admitted in the last stages of disease. 

In violation of a law enacted by the legislature last winter, 
persons are still sent to the almshouse in a dying condition. In 
the month of September four such were received, all of whom 
died within forty-eight hours after admission. 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



The Physician's records show that the number admitted 

to the hospital during the year was .... 811 

Discharged, 712 

Number of deaths, 99 

Number of births, . . . . . . 30 



Of the latter, eighteen were illegitimate. 

The moral and religious welfare of the inmates is attended 
to by the Chaplain and Superintendent. A Sabbath school, 
embracing nearly three hundred pupils, forms an interesting 
feature of the exercises each Sabbath. 



SALARIES OP SUPERINTENDENT AND OFFICERS. 

John M. Brewster, jr., M. D., Superintendent, 

Mrs. C. S. Brewster, Matron, 

William K. Vaill, Chaplain, 

Joseph D. Nichols, Physician, 

Joseph H. Brewster, Clerk and Asst. Sup't. 

Harriet E. Darte, Teacher, . 

Lucy M. Colton, Teacher, . 

Jane E. Hastings, Teacher, . 

M. Augusta Colton, Teacher, 

Frances I. Phelps, Teacher, 

Irene I. Burnette, Teacher, 

Flora Hill, Nurse, . . 

Mary W. Richmond, Assistant Matron, 

Susan C. Yarrington, Assistant Matron, 

Lucyette Mason, Seamstress, 

Jane L. Hayes, Laundress, . 

John N. Lacey, Engineer, Sfc, 

Daniel W. Knight, Cook in inmates' department 

and charge of boys' clothing, . 
Edwin Doane, Farmer, 
Charles Adams, Farmer, 
John McDonald, Baker, 
Frank H. Wood, Assistant, 
Sanford C. Bond, Watchman, 
Joseph F. Gibbs, charge of boys, Sfc, 



,200 00 


300 00 


200 00 


600 00 


600 00 


250 00 


156 00 


156 00 


156 00 


156 00 


156 00 


192 00 


208 00 


156 00 


192 00 


156 00 


600 00 


300 00 


420 00 


375 00 


416 00 


300 00 


300 00 


216 00 



1865.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 7 

We append the report of the Superintendent, which will be 
found comprehensive and explicit in detailing the operations 
and financial affairs of the almshouse. We also annex the 
reports of the Physician and Chaplain, to which we invite 
attention. 

In conclusion, the Inspectors desire to bear testimony to the 
earnest endeavors of the Superintendent in the discharge of his 
many duties, and to his uniform kindness to the hundreds of 
children committed to his care. The Matron, for her personal 
attention to all the domestic affairs of the institution, and the 
other subordinate officers, for their faithfulness, have our cordial 
commendation. 

GORDON M. FISK, 
GILBERT A. SMITH, 
GEORGE CHANDLER, 

Inspectors. 
State Almshouse, Monson, 
Sept. 30th, 1865. 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 



SUPEEINT EN DENT'S EEPOET 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — The Superintendent submits to your Board the 
following Annual Report for the year ending September 30th, 

1865:— 

The number in the institution at the date of last Report, 

October 1st, 1864, 620 

The number admitted since, including 28 born in the 

institution, 803 

Whole number supported since last Eeport, . . . 1,423 

Number discharged and deserted, . . . 783 

died, 99 

Remaining October 1st, 1865,— 
Men, .... . . . .45 

Women, 95 

Boys under 15 years of age, .... 251 
Girls under 15 years of age, . . . . 150 

Total, 541 

1,423 

Of the number discharged, 97 are children indentured and 
on trial. 

Average number supported through the year, 605. 

Average number of school children per week through the 
year, 331. 



1865.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



Persons admitted this year were born in, 
Massachusetts, 
Maine, 

New Hampshire, . 
Vermont, . 
Connecticut, 
Rhode Island, 
New York, . 
Other States, 
Ireland, 
England, 
Scotland, . 
Germany, . 
British Provinces, 
France, 

Other countries, . 
Unknown, . 

Total, . 



311 
9 

2 
9 

18 
5 

26 

23 
270 

52 

14 
8 

24 
3 
9 

20 

803 



The ages of paupers received during the year are as 
follows : — 





■a 




o 


in 












o 




S -1 








CJ 


CO 




"3 








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a © 


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149 


99 


88 


51 


134 


101 


92 


48 


35 


6 


803 





Of the number received during the year, 21 came from 
Tewksbury State Almshouse; 71 from Bridgewater State 
Almshouse ; and 267 from Palmer, — nearly all of whom were 
travelling paupers. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

■ I. Assets. 

By Valuation of David Bryant, Esq. 

Real Estate, — 
176 acres of land, viz., 25 acres of woodland, and 
151 acres pasturage, meadow and tillage, . . $13,724 87 



10 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Buildings, $91,284 00 

Total real estate, ..... $105,008 87 

Personal Estate, — 
Live stock on the farm, consisting of 3 
horses, 22 cows, 6 oxen, 1 bull, 12 
head young cattle, 23 hogs and 31 

pigs, $5,510 15 

Products of the farm, .... 11,277 14 
Carriages and agricultural implements, 3,014 56 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 5,383 37 
Beds and bedding in inmates' depart- 
ment, 10,531 99 

Other property in inmates' department, 4,044 97 
Personal property in Superintendent's 

2,868 20 
6,873 01 
1,324 23 
1,085 82 
882 85 
8,114 12 
518 45 



department, 
Ready-made clothing, . 
Dry goods, .... 
Provisions and groceries, 
Drugs and medicines, . 
Fuel, .' 
Library, .... 

Total personal property, . . 61,428 86 

Total assets, ..... $166,437 73 

II. RECEIPTS. 

Amount of cash received from the annual appro- 
priation for 1865, $35,290 44 

Amount of cash received from the unexpended 

appropriation of 1864, 8,146 53 

Amount of cash received from special appropria- 
tion to meet deficiency bills of 1864, . . 5,259 29 

Amount of cash received from special appropria- 
tion of 1864 for new barn 2,000 00 

Amount of cash received from unexpended appro- 
priation of 1863, transferred to 1864 for new 
barn, 1,330 00 

Total cash received from appropriations, . $52,026 26 



1865.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



11 



Cash on hand October 1st, 1864, . 
Cash received for articles sold, 
Cash received for board of paupers, 
Cash received from loans, . 

Total receipts, . 

III. EXPENDITURES. 

[A.] Current Expenditures. 
First, — Salaries of Superintendent and officers, 

($1,166.44 of the above was for educational pur 
poses.) 

Paid for labor, 

Salaries of Inspectors, .... 

Total for salaries, wages and labor, 

Second, — Provisions and Supplies : 

Meats of all kinds, .... $5,374 85 

Fish of all kinds, . . . . 675 80 

Fruit and vegetables, .... 288 70 
894 barrels of flour, average cost per 
barrel delivered at Palmer depot, 

$10.79gV ¥ , 9,646 39 

Grain and meal for table, . . . 80 30 

Grain and meal for stock, . . . 978 41 

Tea, coffee and chocolate, . . . 693 76 

Sugar and molasses, . . . . 1,538 01 

Milk and cheese, . . . . . 2,142 03 

Salt and other groceries, . . . 962 38 

All other provisions, . . . . 1,069 59 

Total for provisions and supplies, 

Third, — Clothing, shoes, hats and caps, 
Fourth, — Fuel and lights, . 
Fifth, — Medicines and medical supplies, 
Sixth, — Furniture, dry goods and bedding, 
Seventh, — Transportation and travelling expenses 
Eighth, — Ordinary repairs, .... 
Ninth, — All other expenses, 

Total current expenditures, 



$428 41 




1,412 54 




125 m 




579 25 






$2,545 86 




• • 


$54,572 12 



$7,793 69 



442 05 

480 00 

!,715 74 



23,450 22 



1,236 11 

5,646 62 

184 37 

6,212 60 

589 35 

727 16 

3,017 94 

,780 11 



12 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



[B.] Extraordinary Expenditures. 
1st. Buildings and improvements. 

One barn, 82 feet long, 42 feet wide, 22 feet posts, 

with cellar underneath, $3,909 25 

Building bank wall around barn, ... 38 50 

2d. Extraordinary repairs. 

New wash tubs and boilers in laundry, . . 72 15 

3d. Miscellaneous expenditures. 

Lightning conductors, $133.50 ; the town of Mon- 
tague for support of pauper, $50.87 ; and iron 
bake pans, $25, ..... 209 37 

Total extraordinary expenditures, 

Total expenditures, . . . 

IY. LIABILITIES. 

Money borrowed and not repaid, . 
Interest on loan to October 1st, 1865, . 

Total liabilities, . . . . $582 15 

Y. CASH ACCOUNT. 

Dr.— To cash on hand October 1st, 1864, . . $428 41 
since drawn from State treasury at 



$4,229 27 


$54,009 38 

$579 25 
2 90 



sundry times, . . . 


52,026 26 


received from sale of produce, 


454 39 


received from sale of other articles, 


958 15 


received from loans, 


579 25 


received from all other sources, 


125 66 


Total, . 


$54,572 12 


Cr. — By cash paid for salaries, wages and labor, 


$8,715 74 


provisions and supplies, . 


23,450 22 


fuel and lights, 


5,646 62 


clothing, furniture, dry 




goods and bedding, 


7,448 71 


medicine and medical sup- 




plies, .... 


184 37 


ordinary repairs and other 




expenses, 


4,334 45 



1865.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 

Cr. — By cash paid for extraordinary repairs and 



13 



improvements, . . $4,019 90 
all other extraordinary 





expenses, 


209 37 


cash on hand 


September 30th, 1865, 


562 74 


Total, 


. $54,572 12 


VI. i 


SUMMARY OF THE ABOVE. 




Total receipts, . 




$54,572 12 


Total expenditures, 




54,009 38 


Cash on hand, . 




562 74 


Total liabilities, . 




582 15 


*Total resources, 




9,709 56 



Balance of liabilities in favor of the institution, $9,127.41. 
The following statement shows the annual cost for support- 
ing paupers : — 



Dr. — Cash on hand October 1st, 1864, . 

since drawn from State treasury, 
received from all other sources, . 



Cr. — By increased cash value of assets, $20,169 94 
cash on hand Oct. 1st, 1865, 562 74 
cash paid for all current 
expenses, .... 33,839 44 



$428 41 

52,026 26 

2,117 45 

$54,572 12 



$54,572 12 



Dividing the current expenses by the average number of 
inmates, gives an average annual cost of $55.94 ; and dividing 
this sum by 52, the total number of weeks, we have as the 
weekly cost, $1.07||. 

ESTIMATED PRODUCE OP THE FARM. 

3,785 pounds pork, . . .... . $593 45 

5,102 « beef, ...... 709 82 



* Balance of unexpended appropriation for the year 1865. 



14 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



787 pounds veal, . 
45 pigs sold, 
9 calves sold, 
7,300 pounds hay sold, 
135 tons hay, 

4^ " corn stalks, 
20 " corn fodder, 
1,230 pounds corn stalk butts, 

2 tons squashes, . 
2,500 pounds summer squash, 
2 tons oat straw, 
2 " bones, 
14 bushels buckwheat, . 



62 


u 


oats, 


1,016 


it 


potatoes, 


2,580 


u 


carrots, 


42 


u 


onions, 


175 


u 


yellow corn, 


97 


u 


sweet corn, . 


2 


u 


quinces, 


375 


u 


beets, . 


195 


a 


turnips, 


35 


a 


parsnips, 


9 


a 


tomatoes, 


30 


a 


native apples, 


9 


a 


beans, . 


■8* 


u 


seed beans, . 


n 


u 


peas, . 


40 


u 


cucumbers, . 


H 


u 


currants,. 


56 


pounds 


3 pie-plant, 


3,500 heads 


cabbage, 


37,188 


quarts 


milk, 


3,099 


pound 


3 butter, 


322 cords i 


nanure, . 




Lettuce, . 




Sundry small articles, 



1110 18 


201 75 


32 50 


78 45 


2,430 00 


36 00 


240 00 


6 15 


80 00 


50 00 


26 00 


34 00 


10 70 


42 16 


711 20 


1,290 00 


. 63 00 


183 75 


89 74 


7 00 


262 50 


87 75 


26 25 


6 75 


37 50 


24 75 


10 50 


15 00 


30 00 


10 40 


5 60 


350 00 


2,231 28 


1,425 54 


1,288 00 


10 00 


65 62 


$12,913 29 



1865.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 15 

The new barn, at a cost of three thousand nine hundred and 
nine dollars and twenty-five cents (13,909.25,) which has been 
erected the past season, I am happy to say is now nearly com- 
pleted. It is a warm, substantial building, well built, with 
plenty of light and good ventilation ; 80 feet long and 42 wide, 
with 22 feet posts, having a granary, a tool-room, and stalls for 
24 cows, and storage capacity for one hundred or more tons of 
hay ; a cellar 9|- feet deep under the whole, with an opening to 
the south into the barn-yard, and a brick partition running the 
entire length ; thus giving a portion of the cellar, 16 by 80 feet, 
to roots, and the balance for composting. 

In addition to the fine fruit orchard of pears and apples set 
out last year, arrangements have been made for planting 
another and a larger one of four acres this present autumn. 
A large strawberry bed was set early in September, containing 
sixteen hundred plants (1,600 Wilson's Seedlings,) and they 
are doing well, considering the severe drouth. The successful 
cultivation of currants and raspberries (white and black,) is 
beginning to add much to the value and luxury of our summer 
fruits. 

In my Report of last year attention was called to the fact 
that various abuses too often existed in the case of indentured 
children, and I suggested that an agent or some person be 
appointed, whose business it should be to visit them and report 
to the proper authorities the result of his visitations. The 
experience of another year brings additional strength and testi- 
mony to the importance of such an appointment. Justice to 
the indentured orphan demands it. 

Attention was also called in my last Report to the importance 
of having better accommodations for the sick. Our rooms for 
hospitals are not well located, they are very inconvenient, and 
are so situated as to subject the patients to a great deal of noise, 
depriving them of the quiet and stillness which they desire and 
so much need. A suitable building for this purpose ought 
surely to be erected and placed at a proper distance from all 
the others, and thus give to the sick every reasonable comfort. 

A great source of difficulty exists in the restrainment of 
certain inmates, especially the mothers of illegitimate children. 
I can see many reasons why it would be right and proper to 
make a law causing the arrest of all such persons as abscond 



16 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 

from the State almshouses, and thereby abandon helpless 
children, and give them the privilege of returning to the insti- 
tution, and take therefrom their unfortunate offspring and 
provide for them elsewhere at their own expense ; or remain in 
the institution and assist in their care until honorably dis- 
charged ; otherwise, punished by confinement to hard labor in 
the house of correction for the county within which she may 
be so found, for such term as the law shall designate. If such 
persons were compelled to submit to wholesome laws touching 
this point, their own condition would be greatly improved, 
imposition and immorality lessened, vagrancy checked, and 
society much better protected. The State cannot sanction such 
unnatural conduct on the part of a mother ; for it is infanti- 
cide at the least (if nothing worse,) to permit children of such 
tender age to be thus separated from their parents. 

It will be seen that of thsfive hundred and forty-one inmates 
at this present time, four hundred and one are children, and 
that the average number supported through the year has been 
six hundred and five ; and from the weekly reports, as shown by 
the registers, I find that the average number of school children 
through the year has been three hundred and thirty-one. There 
are five schools, in which seven female teachers are employed ; 
six constantly, and the seventh when one of the others is 
absent having a week's vacation, which is granted to all the 
teachers every three months. Notwithstanding the school 
children here are all so young (for the average age in school 
No. 1 is ten, school No. 2, nine, school No. 3, eight, school 
No. 4, seven, school No. 5, five,} and classes are being con- 
stantly broken in upon and oftentimes entirely destroyed by 
our system of binding out, which takes away the brightest and 
best scholars, still I am inclined to think the children 
appear quite as far advanced as those of an equal age in the 
public schools of any town in the State. 

What an influence for good the institution exerts can be 
fully understood and appreciated only by an actual seeing of 
the hundreds of otherwise destitute children who are fed and 
educated within the almshouse ; and still more by a knowledge 
of the great numbers of indentured children who have been 
redeemed from vice and pauperism, and scattered throughout 
New England, and even beyond, in their new homes, where it 



1865.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 17 

is hoped they are growing up into respectable life. The inside 
work of the institution covers only a part of its sphere. There 
is this large " outside parish" of a thousand or nearly a thou- 
sand indentured girls and boys, whom it might be well to visit 
and personally exhort and encourage to rise to a better life. It 
would then be seen, I believe, that the Monson almshouse could 
boast of the history of scores of its indentured and adopted 
children with quite as good reason, and with nearly as much 
interest as many an alma mater can boast of their classic sons 
and daughters. 

To speak in detail of the other leading features of the insti- 
tution would be repeating in substance what has often been 
written in former Reports. Having, therefore, already given 
the necessary statistical and financial statements, I cannot do 
better than to add that the actual condition and management 
of the institution in every department, with its failures and 
successes, its mistakes and corrections, its discipline, its moral 
and religious character, the inmates, of whatever class, the 
farm, with its improvements, its large crops and increasing 
herd of cattle, the buildings and their surroundings, in short, 
the whole system, is now so well known, and has received so 
many criticisms, that the institution, with all its faults and 
excellences, has really become its own expositor. 

To the assistant officers I extend thanks for their readiness 
to cooperate with me in the discharge of duty ; and to your 
honorable Board, for counsel and aid, I am under many 
obligations. 

JOHN M. BREWSTER, Jr., 

Superintendent. 

Monson State Almshouse, 
October 1, 1865. 



18 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S EEPOET 



To the Inspectors of the State Almshouse, Monson : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the Twelfth Annual 
Report of the medical department of this institution, for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1865. 

Although we have had no prevailing epidemic, the mortality 
has been greater, during the past year, than that of any pre- 
ceding year, except one, since the opening of the house. There 
have been, during the year, 99 deaths, thirty-five of which 
occurred in infants under one year old, most of whom had been 
deserted by their mothers, and died for want of maternal care. 
About an equal number came in here hopelessly diseased and 
died, several of them in a few days and some of them in a few 
hours after admission. For instance, during the month of 
September four sick persons were brought in, three of whom 
died in forty-eight hours and one in sixteen hours after admis- 
sion. 

During the last eight months we have enjoyed an almost 
entire immunity from the contagious purulent ophthalmia 
which has proved such a fruitful source of trouble in the years 
that have gone by. I think the new arrangement which allows 
the children to wash, each one in a separate jet of water, has 
contributed materially to bring about a " consummation so 
devoutly to be wished." 

The law passed last winter to prevent towns from sending 
persons dangerously sick to the almshouses has failed to 
accomplish its object so far as we are concerned, as an unusu- 
ally large number of such persons have been sent to us since 
the passage of the law. 

With sentiments of high regard, I remain, 

Respectfully yours, 

J. D. NICHOLS. 



1865.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



19 





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20 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



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1865.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26, 



21 



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22 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



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Asphyxia by suffoc 
Ascites, . 
Anasarea, 
Convulsions, . 
Croup, . 

Congenital Syphili 
Congestion ofBrai 
" of Lunj 
Cancrum Oris, 
Cholera Infantum, 
Debility, 
Diarrhoea, 
Disease of Heart, 
Epistaxis, 
Fever, Typhoid, 

" Scarlet, 
Gangrene, 
Jaundice, 
Marasmus, . 
Meningitis, . 
Osteo Sarcoma, 



1865.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 26. 



23 



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24 



ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 3, 

Showing the JSfo. of Births in the Monson State Almshouse during each 
Month, from Oct. 1, 1864, to Sept. 30, 1865, with a statement of the 
sex, and whether illegitimate, twins, or stillborn, the birth-place of the 
Mothers, and the whole No. since the opening of the Institution. 







"3 


m 

<D 

"3 


m 

"3 


Illegitimate. 


n 

a 


e 

o 

CO • 


Birth-place of Mothers. 


MONTHS. 


CO 

o 

3 


"3 
S 
o 


o 


to 
eS 
EG 


c 

04 

« 

S-c 


1 

a 




*§ 

■eg 


1 


October, 




1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


November, . 




2 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


December, . 




3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


- 


1 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


January, 




4 


3 


1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


February, 




1 


. - 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


~ 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


March, . 




5 


4 


1 


2 


1 


3 


- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


April, . 




4 


1 


3 


1 


- 


1 


" 


- 


2 


1 


1 


- 


~ 


May, . 




1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


June, . 




3 


2 


1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


~ 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


July, . 




2 


2 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


August, 




3 


- 


3 


- 


3 


3 


~ 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


September, 




1 


1 


- 


1 

9 


9 


1 

18 


— 


2 


1 
13 


]6 


1 


— 


- 


Totals, 


30 


16 


14 


- 


Whole No. since") 
the opening of >• 
the Institution,) 


246 


105 


141 


57 


51 


108 


8 


19 


32 


186 


5 


8 


11 



1865.] public document—No. 26. 25 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To the Inspectors of the Monson State Almshouse : 

Gentlemen, — The year that has just closed, has been dis- 
tinguished by no extraordinary changes in the religious aspects 
of thfe institution. 

The usual services have been conducted in the chapel every 
Sabbath morning, and have been attended by the officers and 
most of the inmates. Serious attention has been given to my 
public addresses in which I have endeavored to exhibit and 
inculcate, in the plainest possible manner, the moral and reli- 
gious duties taught in the Bible. A pleasant part of our wor- 
ship has been the singing, which has been performed in a very 
creditable manner by a choir composed of some of the officers 
and by the children who have been taught by the teachers of the 
day-schools to sing, with spirit and good taste, a variety of inter- 
esting and appropriate hymns. Some of them commence with 
such words as these : 

" Dare to do right ; dare to be true." 

" Let little children come to me, 
The Lord, the Saviour, said." 

" This life is a battle with Satan and sin, 

And we are the soldiers the victory to win ; 
And Christ is the captain of our little band ; 
Whatever opposes, for him we shall stand : 
We will stand for the right." 

" Pleasant is the Sabbath bell." 

" Jerusalem forever bright, 
Beautiful land of rest." 

I have no hesitation in saying that their performances in this 
department will compare favorably with those of any equal 
number of persons of the same age, whom I have ever met. 






26 ALMSHOUSE AT MONSON. [Oct. '6b. 

Funeral services have been conducted in connection with the 
death of inmates, and frequent visits have been made to the 
sick and dying in the hospitals, some of whom have borne pleas- 
ing testimony that their way down to the " dark valley " has 
been cheered by the light of the glorious Gospel of Jesus Christ. 

Having repeatedly visited the day-schools, I have been much 
pleased to witness the successful labors of the teachers and the 
happy results of a discipline which has been at once " strict 
without severity, and kind without indulgence." 

The Sabbath school in which I have officiated as Superin- 
tendent, has, with one or two exceptions, been in session every 
Sabbath of the year. The average number of pupils has been 
about two hundred and ninety ; their ages have varied from 
four to seventeen. They are divided according to age, sex, 
and mental capacity, into nine classes, under the charge of as 
many different teachers. The school is opened with prayer by 
the Superintendent or by repeating the Lord's Prayer by the 
children, in concert, and reading a portion of Scripture, which 
is followed by the recitations of the classes and by singing. 
Some of the lessons committed to memory have been the ten 
commandments, the Mosaic history of the creation, twenty- 
third Psalm, twelvth chapter of Ecclesiastes, the parable of 
the Prodigal Son, and various verses of the New Testament, 
including a large portion of " Christ's Sermon on the Mount." 
" The Child's Scripture Question Book," published by the 
American Sunday School Union, has been used in the school to 
some extent. The recitations have been followed by familiar 
and appropriate oral instruction. The children have thus had 
an opportunity of learning their duty as subjects both of the 
human and Divine government. One of the teachers has made 
the following suggestion which seems well worthy of consider- 
ation : " I think the children ought to have a small library, 
suited to their wants, to which they can have access, and thus be 
enabled to dig for themselves of the precious ore of knowledge." 

Praying our Heavenly Father to bless our labors in behalf of 
all those committed to our care, I am, gentleman, 



la Very respectfully yours, 

WM. K. VAILL, Chaplain. 
State Almshouse, Monson, Oct. 1, 1865.